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sandbagger

One for Lou or Dej

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Sandbagger, that would be a very nice RC example of the Alcock A.1 Scout. Here is the skinny on this one-of-a-kind WWI aeroplane, (courtesy of Wikipedia):

 

"The Alcock Scout, also known as the A.1, was a curious "one-off" experimental fighter biplane flown briefly during World War I. It was assembled by Flight Lieutenant John Alcock at Moudros, a Royal Naval Air Service base in the Aegean Sea. Alcock took the forward fuselage and lower wings of a Sopwith Triplane, the upper wings of a Sopwith Pup, and the tailplane and elevators of a Sopwith Camel, and married them to a rear fuselage and vertical tail surface of original design (presumably by Alcock himself). It was powered by a 110hp Clerget 9Z engine, and carried a .303 Vickers machine gun. Affectionally referred to as the "Sopwith Mouse" by Alcock and his fellow designers, Alcock never flew it himself, but squadron-mate FSL Norman Starbuck made a few flights in it, the first on 15 October 1917. However, it crashed in early 1918, was written off and never flew again."

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I thought it looked like Dr. Faustus had merged several Sopwith craft into one interesting chimera.

And I knew, that Lou (or Dej) would solve the question.

:good:

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Sandbagger, that would be a very nice RC example of the Alcock A.1 Scout. Here is the skinny on this one-of-a-kind WWI aeroplane, (courtesy of Wikipedia):

 

"The Alcock Scout, also known as the A.1, was a curious "one-off" experimental fighter biplane flown briefly during World War I. It was assembled by Flight Lieutenant John Alcock at Moudros, a Royal Naval Air Service base in the Aegean Sea. Alcock took the forward fuselage and lower wings of a Sopwith Triplane, the upper wings of a Sopwith Pup, and the tailplane and elevators of a Sopwith Camel, and married them to a rear fuselage and vertical tail surface of original design (presumably by Alcock himself). It was powered by a 110hp Clerget 9Z engine, and carried a .303 Vickers machine gun. Affectionally referred to as the "Sopwith Mouse" by Alcock and his fellow designers, Alcock never flew it himself, but squadron-mate FSL Norman Starbuck made a few flights in it, the first on 15 October 1917. However, it crashed in early 1918, was written off and never flew again."

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And there was me thinking I'd stump you :no:

post-15340-0-05926600-1314480145.jpg

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I must admit Sandbagger that I was forced to pull out my copy of Lamberton's Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War and sift through all the photos in the "British Rare and Experimental Aircraft" section at the back of the book. I was stymied for a while on this one Sir, but I shall remember what it looks like from this point forward. :smile:

 

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Ooo, there's an interesting one Olham. The Gourdou-Leseurre GL.a / C1 fitted with the 150hp Hispano Suiza, (or maybe it was the 180hp). Post WWI models of GL aircraft were very fine aeroplanes, not that this version didn't also have good performance for a late-War plane. Not sure why it didn't see combat service.

 

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Spot on, Lou - you know your planes and pilots very well.

 

I have, by the way, an idea how to make any future quiz a good bit more tricky,

cause it wouldn't be so easy to google.

 

If you wrote some detail about a certain pilot's history - or a plane's - and then ask

the candidates to come up with the correct name, or the details (like paint job).

Just an idea to keep the quick search experts at bay, so more people would

(hopefully) take part.

Edited by Olham

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