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RIBob

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About RIBob

  1. Merry X-mas to all

    A very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to ALL!
  2. Forgive me if this is the wrong place for this topic (Mods, please move) or if this has been previously been discussed. In these days of modern Graphics Cards (GPU) being unobtainable at reasonable prices, many older computers (or even some relatively new ones) can significantly benefit from some careful upgrading. Likely this can be done with parts that are reasonably priced, and fairly easyto install. Most Central Processor Units (CPUs) can be upgraded to a more advanced version, as long as they will mate to the existing socket in the Mother Board (MB). For example, I went from an I5 CPU to an I9 CPU. on my Dell 8930. Being aware of the power required by an upgraded CPU is essential, and might require the addition of a more powerful Power Supply Unit (PSU). But not always; I went from an I3 CPU to an I7 CPU on my elderly Dell laptop, and since the power draw on both CPUs was the same, (the I7 CPU was a Dell option on my model of laptop) all was well. Most computer Cases will allow the installation/upgrading of additional/existing cooling fans. Some computers, like my XPS 8930, omitted a front case fan (a Dell Accessory), and my computer had a small, 90mm top case fan, and I upgraded both the top fan, and added a 120mm front case fan via Dell accessory brackets. I also replaced the cheezy Dell CPU cooling fan unit with a Dell Alienware unit that has a fan and radiator that exhausts up and out directly through the (upgraded) top case fan, instead of the original unit exhausting into the case itself. I also added a finned aluminum heat sink for the Voltage Regulator Modules (VRM) on my Mother Board (MB). The fittings for the screws of the VRM heat sink were present on the MB, but Dell omitted it from my model of computer. My preoccupation with cooling the computer with decent airflow is because both the CPU and GPU will self-throttle due to excess heat. Intaking cold air into the computer case, and exhausting warm air out of the case allows all components of the computer to run at best temperature and at full capacity, and for longer time than a poorly vented case will allow. I discovered all these Dell omissions (and upgrades) by searching "how to upgrade my {model specific} computer". Most useful suggestions were on forums specifically dealing with my particular model of computer. I suggest watching this Youtube vid (NOT shilling for him) as being useful: Can't upgrade your GPU? Upgrade this instead... - YouTube I hope all the above is useful to some folks. Performing the upgrades above certainly was very useful for me. YMMV, and best of luck!
  3. The future of First Eagles

    Thanks for useful comments! I have modified my Dell XPS 8930 computer with 9th Gen I9 CPU (with Alienware CPU cooler), installed a 3060Ti OC Graphics card, 32 GB RAM, and a number of SSDs, plus upgraded PSU. I also upgraded top case fan to max allowable 120mm, and installed two front case fans, also of max allowable 120mm. The omitted finned aluminum heat sink for the Voltage Regulator Modules on the circuit board was also installed. Running ROF poses no problems even when run at max settings. Concur that some computers might have issues, but sometimes older computers can be usefully upgraded even in these days of GPUs being scarce at anything like MSRP. Thank you again for helpful andkind comments!
  4. Oh, I see. Modern graphics cards, exclusive of the rest of the computer, can draw as much as 300W. Add to that maybe 200W for the CPU, and add some "headroom" for the rest of the computer and peripherals, plus some "future-proofing, and 1200W is about right for the forseeable future. Most PSUs "like" to operate somewhere in the middle of their power range, and that is where they are at their most efficient.
  5. Sorry, don't understand. I do have an emergency Generator, but using my computer in conjunction with my Genny requires an Uninterruptable Power Supply as an interface, since my Genny does not produce the pure sine wave electricity that electronics demand.
  6. I plan on updating my SF2 and FE2 games soon, and I will no doubt need some help.
  7. Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings. Unfortunately, I reckon this will affect the EAW users of "legacy" computers, many of whom have elderly, pre-1XXX level GFX cards installed. List of Gfx cards affected: https://www.rockpapershotgun.com/its-official-nvidia-will-stop-supporting-gtx-600-and-700-gpus-from-october Supplimentary info concerning OpSys no longer supported: https://techxplore.com/news/2021-06-nvidia-windows-kepler-gpus.html What does this mean? Not an Expert, but Nvidia updates for most pre-1XXX series graphics cards will cease. Your pre-1XXX series graphics card will still work in the future as it did in the past, but Nvidia will no longer support them with updates. I'm not sure about Nvidia discontinuing support for legacy OpSys, except that the Opsys involved are Win 7, 8, and 8.1. Suggest updating your pre 1XXX series card PRIOR to cut-off date, straight from Nvidia website. Unfortunately, the market for even lower-end Gfx cards (pre-1XXX cards) is so price-inflated that many 1XXX series cards are vastly over-priced compared to MSRP, and possibly unobtainable. I recently sold some 7XX series Nvidia Gfx cards for about 3x what I paid for them not long ago. That's how the bids on ebay went. Users of computers with dedicated CPU-based graphics, such as many laptop users, may find upgrading physically impossible, although some laptops might allow upgrading their CPU and/or discrete grapics card. Whether or not an existing Gfx card is included in Nvidia's "list" is dependent on the user's computer, and its' configuration. I recently upgraded my Dell N5050 laptop from original I3 CPU to I7 CPU. Still the same internal CPU-based Gfx unit. YMMV. Other laptops might have discrete Gfx cards, and possibly their discrete pre-1XXX level Graphics cards might be capable of being updated. In a more rational Gfx card market, the answer would be simple: Upgrade to an appropriate 1XXX level (or better) Gfx card. Unfortunately even such relatively low-level cards such as pre-1XXX series Gfx cards bring prices far in excess of MSRP. 1XXX level cards will likely see a significant price boost after this announcement becomes widely known. OTOH, if one wishes to upgrade within the pre-1XXX series cards, the prices for the pre-1XXX series of Nvidia cards is likely to remain stable, or even drop a bit., post announcement. Users of Small Form Factor (SFF) computers will find their choices very constrained, as such Half-Height, Low Profile cards have always been in short supply--and their market price has always reflected this. Yet another issue is that some users of "legacy computers" will find that Gfx cards of 1XXX level and above will have significantly greater power draw than pre-1XXX level cards, and their computer's proprietary Power Supply Unit may not be able to run their proposed Gfx card, or be replaced with a higher-power unit. As a benchmark (of sorts) an Nvidia 1030 Gfx card will run perfectly well on my old Win 7 Dell Optiplex 760 computer, even with wimpy 240W proprietary PSU. For reference: Nvidia 4000 series cards soon to be announced. Upgrading one's hardware is, unfortunately, now being made necessary by Computer mfrs, CPU manufacturers, Opsys Mfrs (Win 11 is coming...), and now Graphics card mfrs. In some cases, upgrading may no longer an option, and an entirely new coomputer might be in the offing. FWIW, considering on which 1200W PSU to buy. Thinking ahead, to the power demands of future Gfx cards, and replacing current 600W PSU. Onwards and upwards. Ad Astra!
  8. I have a SFF (Small Form Factor) Dell Optiplex 790 computer. I Upgraded the CPU to the max I7 CPU possible, consonant with Dell (and Intel) recommendations. I also installed an SSD, cloning OEM HDD. Turns out doing so, along with a BIOS update, may allow me to DOUBLE the RAM up from former Max OEM of 16Gb to 32Gb. Presumably this is due to upgraded CPU allowing an updated BIOS, hence additional RAM capacity. These things seem to build on each other. It also seems that updating CPU on Dell Inspirion N5050 laptop from compatible I5 to compatible I7 also may allow, with BIOS update, DOUBLING the RAM from former max of 8Gb to 16Gb max. Since integrated Gfx chip on this laptop also relies on available system RAM, the value of the combined upgrades is obvious. These sorts of upgrades are of value to EAW players, since the game can be played, with all graphics at near max, even on elderly, but upgraded computers and even laptops. The more EAW players, the better, I say. Making their computers better able to run EAW (or any other game) is all to the good. It took some digging, referencing multiple sources, to confirm that the above upgrades were possible, and long-term viable. I suspect that computer mfrs and Intel have scant interest in revealing how some upgrades (CPU/BIOS) also allow other upgrades (RAM). Unsurprisingly, they are much more interested in selling new computers than upgrading older ones. This Upgrading may still be viable for older computers, since suitable components, such as CPUs and some Gfx cards, are not suitable for more modern computers, but still available at reasonable prices for older computers. Nowadays, with the "computer chip" shortage, it is a difficult time to perform some upgrades on many computers; some high-end upgrade components being in great demand or even being unobtainable except at "scalper" prices. Laptop components do NOT seem to have suffered from the price inflation as seen with "conventional" computers. Crypto-currency " Miners" don't use laptops, so upgrading them is still financially viable. Same holds true for many older desktop computers; compatible upgrading components are usually not the components in high demand-- for the present. It may well be that some folks will need to postpone a "new" computer purchase, and will turn to upgrading existing equipment in the interim. Dollars and Sense: Upgrading my laptop with new CPU and Upgraded RAM will cost about $120. I can do the job myself, on kitchen table, in about an hour. Many vids on YouTube about how to perform various upgrades. Compared to the cost of a NEW laptop, the value of upgrading is apparent. I'll try to sell the older components on Ebay to partially re-coup the cost of new components. Addendum: I took stock of all my existing CPUs and Gfx cards lying around, and sent them all to my Ebay guy. With things as they are, I should be able to recoup original $ paid for all of them, even with his "cut". ETA: As things turned out, I seem to have made a decent profit.
  9. Currently 32 Gb RAM installed (64Gb possible), 2 x 1Tb SSDs, Intel I7 8700 (Locked) CPU, and Gigabyte 2060 OC (Factory Overclocked) Pro Gfx card. PSU is a Seasonics fanless 600W unit, with fully modular connections. High-end DVD/CD R/W drive installed for legacy games that require DVDs. Computer is hard-wired to internet and printer. No wireless/bluetooth. Based on considerable research, am doing the following: Upgrading with Dell Alienware 95W CPU cooler, Intel I9 9900K (Unlocked) CPU, upgraded top fan from 70mm to 120mm (which vents both top of case and fan-fed radiator from CPU cooler), and adding two front 120mm fans (with intake filters) powered by PSU. Top case fan and CPU fan are 4-pin units, so fan speed is controlled by Mo-Bo. Front fans are 3-pin units which blow at constant speed, and come with accessory cables which can tailor their speed/noise, if desired. Might add another SSD for backup purposes. I propose to periodically clone Master, Boot Drive onto secondary SSD drive for backup purposes. Even using internal, fast SATA MoBo connections, might take overnight, but who cares? Purpose is to play High-End flight sims, using TrackIR, and using Current Dell Monitor; HD with 120Hz refresh rate, both Gsynch and Vsynch compatible. New Monitor is a possibility, and will investigate 4K options. From what I hear, this will work quite well. Constructive comments welcome! Update: Did not install top case fan due to space issues. Had to install included "Silencer" cable on added lower case fan which is powered directly by modular PSU. It ran at full speed without the included accessory cable, and was extremely noisy. Project a complete success. Updated computer using Nvidia site, Dell, Intel, and Microsoft sites. Thing runs sweet. I'll run some more tests and see if the I9 is a bottleneck, as was the I7. If so, will overclock it, safely.
  10. Welcome New club members

    VBH, your work is much appreciated!
  11. It's entitled "The Luftwaffe Fighter Force", and comprises immediate post-war interrogations of many higher-ups in the Luftwaffe. It is not a fighter-pilot's view, but rather an organizational, operational and tactical discussion of the Luftwaffe throughout its' life. There is some interesting discussion of effective ranges of various Allied and German weapons and aircraft, both currently-used by the Luftwaffe, and some planned to become operational during 1945, had the war lasted longer. Game and scenario developers, will likely find a good deal of useful information in this book, particularly developers of "What If" scenarios. A limitation of the book is because of the imprisonment of many of the German "contributors", the Germans were forced to operate from memory, so people reading this book should confirm the information contained within. Still, for free, there just might be some useful "nuggets".
  12. Hi, VBH! I just found this the other night, and thought you might find it interesting. It's entitled "The Luftwaffe Fighter Force", and comprises immediate post-war interrogations of many higher-ups in the Luftwaffe. It is not a fighter-pilot's view, but rather an organizational, operational and tactical discussion of the Luftwaffe throughout its' life. There is some interesting discussion of effective ranges of various Allied and German weapons and aircraft, both currently-used by the Luftwaffe, and some planned to become operational during 1945, had the war lasted longer. Game and scenario developers, will likely find a good deal of useful information in this book, particularly developers of "What If" scenarios. A limitation of the book is because of the imprisonment of many of the German "contributors", the Germans were forced to operate from memory, so people reading this book should confirm the information contained within. Still, for free, there just might be some useful "nuggets". All the best, RIBob
  13. It's entitled "The Luftwaffe Fighter Force", and comprises immediate post-war interrogations of many higher-ups in the Luftwaffe. It is not a fighter-pilot's view, but rather an organizational, operational and tactical discussion of the Luftwaffe throughout its' life. There is some interesting discussion of effective ranges of various Allied and German weapons and aircraft, both currently-used by the Luftwaffe, and some planned to become operational during 1945, had the war lasted longer. Game and scenario developers, will likely find a good deal of useful information in this book, particularly developers of "What If" scenarios. A limitation of the book is because of the imprisonment of many of the German "contributors", the Germans were forced to operate from memory, so people reading this book should confirm the information contained within. Still, for free, there just might be some useful "nuggets".
  14. Hello, VBH!

    Hello again! posted on another forum, but posted here as well. To those interested: I recently underwent a family death, as well as some minor personal health issues. All of this what the virus ongoing, and my being in an "at-risk" cohort. The former is being dealt-with, and the latter has been resolved. I regret that my attention was diverted, but first things first. RIBob PS: I hope all is well with you!
  15. EAWPRO club now officially open

    Just checking in. Lots of serious family/friends stuff going on, and so am not available at present. Regret this, but hopefully you will forgive me for being diverted elsewhere, for the present. Things will change, eventually. In the meantime, all the very best to those here! RIBob
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