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Vought A-7B Corsair - 57th Fighter Weapons Wing, Tactical Air Command, USAF, 1966

In early 1961, the United States Navy announced a development study for a replacement for the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk announcing the VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) competition stipulating that all proposals had to be based on existing designs and with increased range and payload when compared to the A-4 plus increased accuracy in the delivery of weapons. This coincided with the appointment of Robert McNamara as the new Secretary of Defense for the incoming John F. Kennedy presidency and McNamara wasted no time in directing the Air Force to adopt both the Navy's F-4 Phantom and the Navy's new VAL program.

Vought's VAL proposal to the Navy was based on their F-8 Crusader fighter, having a broadly similar configuration but noticeably shorter and without the variable incidence wing feature. To achieve the required range, Vought's proposal was powered by a single Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-6 turbofan producing over 11,000 lbs thrust and growth/export potential was built in thanks to a modular engine bay designed to also accept the promising Rolls-Royce RB.168 (Spey) turbofan. In addition, Vought squeezed in an impressive array of cutting-edge avionics including the AN/APQ-116 radar, the ILAAS digital navigation system, a digital weapons computer, a Marconi-Elliott HUD and an innovative projected map display system. Unsurprisingly, Vought's design was selected as the winner on February 11th,1963 and they soon received a production contract for an initial batch of 400 aircraft designated A-7 and consisting of 200 A-7A's for the Navy and 200 A-7B's for the Air Force. In early 1964, the aircraft received the name Corsair II (after Vought's successful F4U Corsair of World War 2 and Korea fame) and the A-7 had an incredibly fast and smooth development with the YA-7A making it's first flight on October 31st, 1964.

Whilst some priorty was given to the production of the A-7A for the Navy, the A-7B first entered service in August 1966 with the 57th Fighter Weapons Wing based at Luke AFB Arizona and they were soon followed by the 354th Tactical Fighter Wing based at Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina with the 354th later deploying to Korat Royal Thai AFB, Thailand in April 1967.

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.01_zpsmy441okq.jpg

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.02_zpsaoedzga7.jpg

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.04_zpsoojvmvn6.jpg

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.03_zpsqajwwdmf.jpg

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2 hours ago, Spinners said:

Vought A-7B Corsair - 57th Fighter Weapons Wing, Tactical Air Command, USAF, 1966

In early 1961, the United States Navy announced a development study for a replacement for the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk announcing the VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) competition stipulating that all proposals had to be based on existing designs and with increased range and payload when compared to the A-4 plus increased accuracy in the delivery of weapons. This coincided with the appointment of Robert McNamara as the new Secretary of Defense for the incoming John F. Kennedy presidency and McNamara wasted no time in directing the Air Force to adopt both the Navy's F-4 Phantom and the Navy's new VAL program.

Vought's VAL proposal to the Navy was based on their F-8 Crusader fighter, having a broadly similar configuration but noticeably shorter and without the variable incidence wing feature. To achieve the required range, Vought's proposal was powered by a single Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-6 turbofan producing over 11,000 lbs thrust and growth/export potential was built in thanks to a modular engine bay designed to also accept the promising Rolls-Royce RB.168 (Spey) turbofan. In addition, Vought squeezed in an impressive array of cutting-edge avionics including the AN/APQ-116 radar, the ILAAS digital navigation system, a digital weapons computer, a Marconi-Elliott HUD and an innovative projected map display system. Unsurprisingly, Vought's design was selected as the winner on February 11th,1963 and they soon received a production contract for an initial batch of 400 aircraft designated A-7 and consisting of 200 A-7A's for the Navy and 200 A-7B's for the Air Force. In early 1964, the aircraft received the name Corsair II (after Vought's successful F4U Corsair of World War 2 and Korea fame) and the A-7 had an incredibly fast and smooth development with the YA-7A making it's first flight on October 31st, 1964.

Whilst some priorty was given to the production of the A-7A for the Navy, the A-7B first entered service in August 1966 with the 57th Fighter Weapons Wing based at Luke AFB Arizona and they were soon followed by the 354th Tactical Fighter Wing based at Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina with the 354th later deploying to Korat Royal Thai AFB, Thailand in April 1967.

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.01_zpsmy441okq.jpg

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.02_zpsaoedzga7.jpg

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.04_zpsoojvmvn6.jpg

USAF%20A-7B%20CORSAIR.03_zpsqajwwdmf.jpg

Love the 'SLUFF' - Damn cool skins = Nice Job!

 

img00036.JPG

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"In early 1961, the United States Navy announced a development study for a replacement for the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk announcing the VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) competition stipulating that all proposals had to be based on existing designs and with increased range and payload when compared to the A-4 plus increased accuracy in the delivery of weapons. This coincided with the appointment of Robert McNamara as the new Secretary of Defense for the incoming John F. Kennedy presidency and McNamara wasted no time in directing the Air Force to adopt both the Navy's F-4 Phantom and the Navy's new VAL program."

No language there to replace the A-1 Skyraider.

CL

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8 hours ago, charlielima said:

"In early 1961, the United States Navy announced a development study for a replacement for the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk announcing the VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) competition stipulating that all proposals had to be based on existing designs and with increased range and payload when compared to the A-4 plus increased accuracy in the delivery of weapons. This coincided with the appointment of Robert McNamara as the new Secretary of Defense for the incoming John F. Kennedy presidency and McNamara wasted no time in directing the Air Force to adopt both the Navy's F-4 Phantom and the Navy's new VAL program."

No language there to replace the A-1 Skyraider.

CL

Er, this a what if thread.

My backstory has already advanced some dates so please don't read too much into it! Anyway, as we now know, the A-1 replacement was met by the British TSR1.

TSR1_zpswuyvitfw.jpg

Photo Credit: Günther Sterchi

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