Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Silverbolt

Damn! this is sad:(

Recommended Posts


War does horrible things to people long after the fighting is done. Some never return to normal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I garanty the facts are messed up. More than half are probably drunk driving incidents that are quite common even amongst those who never saw combat. One must also put into perspective that only 121 out of how many thousands of veterans actualy comitted a crime. The numbers seem unsubstantial. War syndrum does exist i just don't think this is it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are also seeing brain damage surface ex post facto, from blast waves of IEDs. Oddly enough this stuff can go undetected for quite a while.

 

The Army has no handle on how many PTSD-cases it will see...these are the dudes that ran Walter Reed BTW (and dont think for a second they would have fixed anything if they had not been caught). am NOT flaming the Army, was very disappointed when it came out, and yes, many people are to blame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is the best term for something called "shell shock" in the past.

It is fully name Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Edited by muesli

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It annoys me when people ascribe it to something in the civilian world...yes, terrible/tragic things happen to civilians to, no question! But "shell shock" is a particular kind of reaction to the horrors of war.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It never ceases to amaze me how every time something bad happens to a vet it is PTSD, and they blame it on the war. yes I am sure that some of the things they saw, or were party to was bad, and I am sure it scared them mentally. I am a vet and I have found that most learn to deal with the transition bad to the real world and never have so much trouble that they end up killing. I am sure different people handle things in different ways but my question is how big a percentage is the 121 reports compared to the number of vets who have gone through the system? How does that number compare to the number of civilian deaths in say L.A. or NYC? I believe that alot of this is people just trying to sell papers, and use it to make a political point. I may be wrong but that is my opinion, BUT get me wrong, I am not saying they didn't need help, or that they won't need it in the future, as everyone owes these guys a debt of gratitude for their service, BUT lets not start pointing a finger and screaming PTSD before the actually facts and numbers are out. I am sure for everyone of these guys, or ladies, there are hundreds that have dealt with the same emotions and feelings. Yes it is always sad for a warrior to return home and them end up doing things like this, but I can not just believe that every young man or woman that returns home is going to end up a stone cold killer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

of course not, and one never knows who it will be. as you say, the media seems to revel in slandering as well as delighting in anything that makes the current campaign look bad, perhaps to push their own agenda.

 

and look at Detroit, DC, where ever and senseless violence is not as scarce as it should be...but trust me in that people will always blame something rather than someone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple my wife and I used to do things with all the time both got deployed to Iraq. They came back 6 months later and we started where we left off, going out doing things, etc, etc. Well all seemed fine for about 2 months, then one day Sheila's friend went home to have lunch with her husband, she found in him the basement. He had hung himself. Just out of the blue, no note, no nothing. Just hung himself. To this day we still do not know why, what he saw over there that affected him. Even the guys in his squad, couldn't believe it. They said he seemed fine, had no problem talking about the combat he was in. The night before we were at their house watching a ball game. To this day, I still can not believe it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I have heard shell shock cases are usualy implosive taking things out on themselvs or keep[ing everything in. The ones that hurt others are for lack of a beter word the thrill junkies or the ones who try to duplicate the high of combat. Combat is kindoff like a drug that gives a sense of adrenalin rush and some get withdrawals after leaving it. As a result they become thrill junkies and murder unfortunatley is a thirll. My father had a case of shel shock. He seamed perfectly fine for years but two months before he died he told me of how his chopper was shot down and all inside died in front of him exept for one who had lost his ear nose two arms and a leg. My fathers inards spilled all over the place. He died when I was 15 and I had no idea about his shell shock story untill the very last moment. Neither did my mom. I guess there are some things you just don't talk about as probably in the casse of your firend USAFTML.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A couple my wife and I used to do things with all the time both got deployed to Iraq. They came back 6 months later and we started where we left off, going out doing things, etc, etc. Well all seemed fine for about 2 months, then one day Sheila's friend went home to have lunch with her husband, she found in him the basement. He had hung himself. Just out of the blue, no note, no nothing. Just hung himself. To this day we still do not know why, what he saw over there that affected him. Even the guys in his squad, couldn't believe it. They said he seemed fine, had no problem talking about the combat he was in. The night before we were at their house watching a ball game. To this day, I still can not believe it.

 

Who's to say it's related to his time spent deployed? If no one knows why, and he left no info behind, then it's entirely possible that his suicide had nothing to do with what he experienced while deployed.

 

Either way, it's a terrible shame that he didn't get the help he needed. The sad thing about suicide is that so many people suffer in silence and believe that there is no other answer, and the family and loved ones are left behind to wonder, "what if?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

few months ago i read something about the vietnam veterans..... when they came back they dindt have the necessary assistance(it was a article, if somewone can send me back this article i will be very glad), i read for a schoolar job, but i doesnt save the source...

if im not mistake is there one movie about one man who came back from vietnam, he was having shellshock, but he could not take some job to maintain the family... i remeber the end, he die in a quarry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy, and We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..