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Canadair

Puppies from the shelter

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I, ve found this article online, and it really discuss all sort of reasons why get a dog form the dog-shelter. I ve been very lucky with this experience and my dog Oilver is th e cutest smartest cuddliest well behaved mutt that I ever saw.

Take some minutes to read the article, and maybe let your kids read it.

 

The advantages of adopting a shelter dog

 

When most people think about getting a dog, they are looking forward to choosing a squirming little puppy from a litter of Labradors (or Poodles, etc) that are tumbling and playing beside their watchful mother. Many people buy their dogs from breeders. Getting a dog at an animal shelter is generally not someone's first choice, but maybe it should be. Shelter dogs can be just as rewarding as purebred puppies. They can be just as crazy, just as amusing, and just as loyal. Although there are some issues to take into consideration before taking home a shelter dog, these concerns should simply make you more informed about your decision. There is no good reason not to get a dog from an animal shelter!

 

One of the most rewarding feelings is supplying a loving companion with the home that it deserves. Many of the dogs at animals shelters are not there for any negative reason. They are usually loving and well-behaved. Perhaps their last owner moved or didn't want the dog anymore, or the dog just got too big. Although when you adopt a dog it should be for life, unfortunately for the dog, this often is not the case. By adopting a shelter dog, you have the chance to make a huge difference in a dog's life.

 

There are some misconceptions about shelter dogs that we must disprove. The first is that you would end up with an old dog that has health problems. This is not true! There are many bounding, healthy young dogs and puppies waiting for homes. In fact, the most common age for dogs to end up at the animal shelter is between one and two years old. The vast majority of these dogs have absolutely nothing wrong with them except for an owner who no longer wants them.

 

Another fear of potential dog owners is that their new shelter dog will come with some incorrigible behavioural problem. One of the best things you can do for yourself is to take your time when choosing a dog. Ask the shelter staff questions about the disposition of your future dog. Find out why the dog was surrendered to the shelter and if it has been unsuccessfully adopted out previously. Spend time with the dog, walking outside and playing; this way you will get to know your future dog outside of its cage. Many dogs act differently when confined in a cage. Realize that the majority of shelter dogs are the most loving and loyal companions that you can find. But also recognize that behavioural problems are a valid concern. Some of these dogs do come from abusive or neglectful backgrounds and it could take a while to retrain it and gain its trust. Not all shelter dogs need this kind of work, but the more challenging dogs are just as rewarding as the rest.

 

 

 

There are other reasons to choose a shelter dog. These include the fact that they are relatively inexpensive compared to purebred puppies. Often, shelter dogs are already vaccinated and spayed/neutered. Also, if you choose to get a mixed-breed dog, they often have fewer health problems than purebreds. Unlike Labradors, they are not at higher risk for hip dysplasia. Unlike Golden Retrievers, they do not have more instances of cancer. A mixed-breed dog can often live a longer life with fewer medical complications.

 

Once you sit down and think about it, there are very few reasons to buy a dog from a breeder. Shelter dogs are just as loyal and loving as any other dog, and giving them the homes they deserve is incredibly rewarding. Make a difference in a dog's life; visit your shelter or go online to a rescue foundation!

Edited by Canadair

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I agree as well! All of my dogs have been shelter dogs and they have been reall good to us and visa versa. We have never had any problems except for one dog who we found out was part chow.

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We've had a couple of dogs from the shelter. They're just like any other dogs, exept they didn't cost us $500. :biggrin:

Edited by Rambler 1-1

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Liberated Dogs are great, way better than one of those mall puppy mills

 

Of course my current best friend came from a trailer park by a owner who raises Red Heelers because he loves them, not to make money...proof in point, it cost me $75 and that was mostly shots/worms/vet

 

A plug for Red Heelers...do NOT get one unless you want a new best friend...they need attention/work/entertainment 33-hours a day...if you are of the I want a dog to treat like a gold fish then get something else...oh, and they are not good with kids since kids at certain ages are about the same height as sheep...

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I got my German Sheppard from a Shelter, His worst problem is he still thinks he is a puppy and he will be 4 in may. Nothing like a hundred pound lap dog :biggrin:

 

Seriously though, thats his biggest problem, he was already house broken and he quickly became protective of my Girlfriend and I. A Great Dog and he only cost me $60.00, I would suggest checking local shelters to anyone who is thinking of getting a dog.

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