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Olham

Just found something - better late than never

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I knew all the time, that the red text in the upper left corner ("Z" key) shows the geographic coordinates of my momentary position in flight.

But I had never before noticed, that you don't even need that red text. When you open your inflight map, they appear in it's upper right

corner, in white.

Now I used them for the first time for a claim report. Not sure, how exactly the claims manager wants them; I left out the numbers after the

comma for the seconds. They coordinates now looked like this:

 

N49*19'35" E5*34'50"

 

I'll report, if it got affirmation (although: I was alone and entered "La Folie Ferme ground crew" as witnesses).

Here's the Nieuport's crash site from GoogleMaps:

 

 

Edited by Olham

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Sorry but I can´t see any kind of debris over there Olham, so that is not enough. Next time please show a photo of the remains please! :rofl: Amazing Olham!

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Hey, you one-railed minds - never heard of Hogwarts? That some can speak to snakes?

Ever heard of Platform 9 3/4 ?

Did it never occur to any of you, that we travel in time several times a week, when we fly OFF?

You simple minds - the Google picture is from today, of course! Tch!

WW1 pilots! Big-mouthed, and only fixated on the next kill, or the village girls! Huh!!!

:rofl:

Edited by Olham

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Ha Ha! Be funny if somebody googles the coordinates of a Nieuport shot down in WW1 and finds the reference in some obscure search page, and actually heads there with a shovel and a metal detector.

 

 

That would be another first for OFF!

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Ohhhhhh now I see Olham, this picture is of today but your claim is of tomorrow, so the debris isn't there yet! Aha, the usual time travel! Claim denied....

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brilliant....how long have I been looking at these maps thinking........"I'm a lesser pilot...I'm cheating....I've no idea where I am"......and never noticed the woods for the trees....Thanks Ol

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I just gave this a try. Shot down five Spad V!! and noted the "geo" location and time. Filling out the form was a total guess as to just how to do it. I mentioned that my flight members ( by name) saw the action then listed the geophysical location of each followed by the listing of the time of each kill.

 

A proper form would help -- I am sure some desk jocky could whip one up.

 

God how I hated paperwork in all of my past jobs!!!!

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CW3SF, you need to write the names of your witnesses into the upper line, no ranks, first and family name, with commas inbetween.

(Best note all wingmen before takeoff).

 

The report itself should NEVER use any semicolons (that is a stop sign for the code language and will stop the report there.).

You could write it like this:

 

Over Soissons, we clashed with 5 Albatros D.V scouts and engaged them. I chased one craft from 3000 feet down to 1000 feet.

Then I shot the whole bottom left wing off. The Albatros crashed into Soissons town at N 49* 22' 54" E 3* 19' 25" at 15:24 h.

 

That's more or less how I write them, with the exception that I never yet used coordinates and can't yet say, if that increases chances.

Edited by Olham

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I've used Google Earth to visit my reconnaissance objectives, but I never thought of it for visiting crash sites before. Of course, as I have never actually shot anything down, it will be my own pilot's crash sites - but at least I could pay my respects!

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Wayfarer, it isn't only good for crash sites.

You can check lakes for example, and you'll find, that they are where real lakes are.

Fly over a lake near your field, and note the coordinates from the inflight map.

Then check in GoogleMaps, and you will most likely find a lake there or very nearby.

It makes flying by map even easier, to check some landmarks around your airfield and see they really exist.

In Alsace, I am flying mostly via paper map - and it feels like being free from any HUDs or info texts - free as a pilot.

Edited by Olham

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Wayfarer, it isn't only good for crash sites.

You can check lakes for example, and you'll find, that they are where real lakes are.

Fly over a lake near your field, and note the coordinates from the inflight map.

Then check in GoogleMaps, and you will most likely find a lake there or very nearby.

It makes flying by map even easier, to check some landmarks around your airfield and see they really exist.

In Alsace, I am flying mostly via paper map - and it feels like being free from any HUDs or info texts - free as a pilot.

 

Yes, I guess lakes stand more chance of still existing than some other features. I like it when you can pick out railway tracks still following the same route.

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