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arthur666

Introduction dates, Su-25, opinions please

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Yes, I know it's a game and we can do whatever we want, really, (F-16C's in The Korean War? Sure...)

 

but my question is:

 

If Operation Red Lightning had begun in September, 1979, would the Soviets have had the Su-25 fighting, given the scope and nature of a full scale offensive into Central Europe?

 

I don't know anything about the process of aircraft service introduction. I have only read the Wikipedia page, which states that the Su-25 went into production in 1978, and was introduced in 1981 for the Afghan War.

Edited by arthur666

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In a state of war I don't think it would be unreasonable to assume planes would enter service sooner...

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In 1980, 4 Su-25 were evaluated in Afghanistan according to some rumors

Edited by jeanba

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The Aerofax Sukhoi Su-25 book states that in 1979 the factory was able to finish two aircraft for acceptance trials (which apparently also included real combat in Afghanistan in march 1980).

The production numbers are stated as follows:

1978: 2

1979: 4

1980: 10

1981: 13

1982: 30

1983: 55

1984: 62

 

and so on and so on.. so one unit in 1979? Plausible

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Not plausible. The first planes were prototypes or pre production batches.

Became operational in 1982 and later.

Introduction into Afghan theater meant, that a handfull early planes were sent to evaluate the possibility of use such planes in AFG. At the same time they tried an armed version of the Yak-52 sportsplane and the Yak-38M STOL. Only for test reasons. The Su-25 proved to be the best solution and so it went into production. The Soviet Army had had no real interest for the Su-25, because it seemd to slow and ugly. But this bird was perfect for AFG and only when its capability were shown in combat the decision was made for full scale production.

Edited by Gepard
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In "worst case" scenario, if they were desperate, they only would've had at the most 6 planes (and those 4 in 79 likely weren't all done by Sept) for use. Without any logistical tail, and remember back then the idea was plentiful spares and sending engines back for maintenance, not to mention no real experience for the ground crews on the type, we're talking at best a dozen or so sorties before they'd have to stop for work.

It just wouldn't be practical, not when there were other proven examples around.

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good info Gepard. also interesting to see how apathy for the CAS role and anything not fast and sexy was the same on both sides!

...and today they are some of the most revered planes on both sides. Ever watch the Wings of the Red Star episode on the Su-25?

Interesting to hear from the USAF pilots who got to fly it.

Edited by arthur666

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