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Dave

F-51's Over Korea

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That's sweet...but I was shocked at first.... I thought you posted F-15's over Korea....not F-51's.....LMAO

 

<C>

Fates

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I got F-15's I can put over Korea. In fact tonight I will. :p

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Check your history my friend. The USAF went from P for Persuit to F for Fighter in the late 40's. That's why the first F-86 was called a P-86. Same goes for the P-47N when it was in ANG service it was the F-47N.

 

http://www.airventuremuseum.org/collection...D%20Mustang.asp

 

http://modelingmadness.com/reviews/korean/fordhamf51.htm

 

http://www.icon.co.za/~pauljnr/saaf.htm

 

From Joe Baughers homepage

 

The P-51D remained in service in considerable numbers with the USAAF for many years after the Second World War ended. In 1948, the newly-formed USAF eliminated the P-for-pursuit category and replaced it with F-for-fighter. The designation of the P-51 was changed to F-51. In addition, the old category of F for photographic reconnaissance was eliminated, and F-6D and F-6K photographic reconnaissance aircraft became RF-51D and RF-51K respectively. Two seat F-6D conversions became TRF-51D.

 

In May 1946, the Air National Guard (ANG) was reformed and ANG fighter units received most of the P-51D/K Mustangs withdrawn from regular USAAF service. It was agreed that the Mustang would go primarily to ANG groups west of the Mississippi, with the ANG groups east of the Mississippi being equipped with the P-47 Thunderbolt. By December of 1948, over 700 Mustangs were serving with 28 ANG squadrons. RF-51D reconnaissance aircraft also served with the ANG. No fewer than 22 of the 27 ANG wings saw service in the Korean War.

 

The Mustang was in action once again when the Korean War began on June 25, 1950. The Mustang was better suited to the small airstrips of Korea than were the F-80s and F-82s based in Japan. Japan-based F-51Ds were immediately transferred to Korea and pressed into service in an attempt to halt the rapid North Korean advance. The Mustangs were based at Kimpo, Pusan, and Pohang, flying out of one field then another in close support operations against the advancing North Koreans. They were called on to carry the brunt of air support missions during these difficult early days of the war, since the jet aircraft of the day did not have enough range to permit sufficient loiter time over the target.

 

In order to build up close support forces, 145 F-51s were brought over from the USA aboard the aircraft carrier USS *Boxer*. These planes were quickly assembled and flown out to combat units. The 18th Fighter-Bomber Wing gave up its F-80 jets for Mustangs, perhaps one of the few occasions in history in which a combat outfit traded in its jets for piston-engined aircraft. The Mustangs were instrumental in halting the North Korean advance, giving United Nations forces enough time to build up sufficient strength to be able to go over onto the offensive. Mustangs flew 62,607 tactical support combat missions. 351 Mustangs were lost in action, most of them the victims of antiaircraft fire. The Mustang was not the best choice for low-level air to ground combat--its belly-mounted radiator and its reliance on liquid coolant made it dangerously vulnerable to ground fire. Although their primary mission was close support, USAF Mustangs did manage to shoot down a few North Korean Yaks when these aircraft made their infrequent appearances. When Mustangs were jumped by Chinese-piloted MiG-15 jet fighters, however, they were faced with an opponent with a far superior performance. When this happened, there was little the Mustangs could do save to try to turn inside the MiGs, hit the deck, and run for home.

 

Mustang pilot Major Louis J. Sebille, commander of the 67th FBS/18th FBW, in an F-51D 44-74394 flew straight into a concentration of enemy troops

 

The last American active-duty Mustang was P-51D-30-NA Ser No 44-74936, which was finally withdrawn from service with the West Virginia ANG in 1957. This airplane is now on display at the WPAFB Museum in Dayton, Ohio. It is, however, painted as P-51D-15-NA Ser No. 44-15174

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So then what is the difference between a P-51 and an F-51, other than the P and F? I mean, I'm sure they made some, if few, enhancements.

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They are both P-51D-30. Field modded of course but that wasn't to common. No difference in performance though.

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So then what is the difference between a P-51 and an F-51, other than the P and F?  I mean, I'm sure they made some, if few, enhancements.

 

Hi PG_Raptor,

 

The only reason the F-51 was even deployed by the USAF was that the first-gen jets did not have the range to be useful in theater. Consequently it was (as USAFMTL states) simply the WWII P-51D-30, renamed F-51 in line with the new designation scheme the military was using.

 

As an aside, the F-51s that went to the ROKAF were literally saved from the scrap-heap.

 

Torquatus

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So then what is the difference between a P-51 and an F-51, other than the P and F? I mean, I'm sure they made some, if few, enhancements.

 

 

as was said,the Basic change was just in the designation,of course both the f-51 and f-47 did get some improvements,one of the biggest questions asked about the deployment of f-51s to korea has been why they were sent in the first place,the f-47 was a much,much better ground attack platform,with those 8 .50s and radial engine that could(and did in ww2) take a Lot of damage..in ww2 there were numerous stories of a/c coming back with up to 7 or 8 cylinders shot,not bad for a 18 cylinder engine huh..there were other examples of f-47s coming back with way over 200 hits on them,a notable one being Lt R.S. Johnsoin of the 61st Fighter Squadron...the highest scoring ace in the ETO was Lt Col Gabreski,hell he either shot himself down with a ricochet bullet or hit the ground with his propeller,either way it shows the bird could take a whole lot of damage as I would think doing over 150mph and hitting ground would do most birds in........unless its a carrier bird....

Edited by Scout_51

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There were other types of 51's in Korea also.....anyone guess what they were? :)

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