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i´m making some new model for the AIM-26/RB-27 Missile and i found this two pictures that shows in my opinion IR-guided missiles but i cant find any info on a ir-guided AIM-26B or RB-27

so any info on that is mor than welcome

 

and what would be the the designation AIM-26B IR ????

 

 

Edited by ravenclaw_007

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I can't find any information on an IR-guided version of the AIM-26B, or licence-built by Saab RB-27. Could be just a nose cone stuck onto a museum piece.

 

This is a nice add-on for the soon-to be released F-102A though! The AIM-26B was used in Southeast Asia on deuces of the 509th FIS - one or two on the center rails. Seen on USAFE deuces and several ANG units also. The nuc version reportedly by ADC. One of the first units to receive the missile was the 482nd FIS which shifted to Florida during the Cuban Missile Crisis and loaded up the nucs there.

 

Are you planning a new AIM-4A/C also? Thanks for the add-on,

Mike

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I can't find any information on an IR-guided version of the AIM-26B, or licence-built by Saab RB-27. Could be just a nose cone stuck onto a museum piece.

 

This is a nice add-on for the soon-to be released F-102A though! The AIM-26B was used in Southeast Asia on deuces of the 509th FIS - one or two on the center rails. Seen on USAFE deuces and several ANG units also. The nuc version reportedly by ADC. One of the first units to receive the missile was the 482nd FIS which shifted to Florida during the Cuban Missile Crisis and loaded up the nucs there.

 

Are you planning a new AIM-4A/C also? Thanks for the add-on,

Mike

 

 

first the AIM-26 / RB-27 and the swiss HM-55

 

the one picture shows the ir-sensor from the J-35 Draken toghether with the RB-27 but i cant find a hint on air guided version

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As someone pointed out, the HARJ inscription on the finnish model indicates it's an exercise round (http://forum.combatace.com/index.php?s=&am...st&p=251813), so it's not really a useful picture...

 

A quick research brings up the GAR-5/6 project, of larger derivatives of the GAR-1/2/3/4 (AIM-4) family.

The GAR-5/6 research eventually led to the GAR-9/11 (AIM-26) family.

The GAR-5 was to be a radar guided version, the GAR-6 would have been the IR guided version, it would have looked like what's on your pictures.

 

As you can see on your second picture, with a Sidewinder for reference, the missile seems longer than the AIM-9 (even accounting for the seemingly wide angle).

Since an AIM-9 is roughly in the 3m length, and an AIM-26 is 2,2m... it can't be an AIM-26...

However, the GAR-5/6 would have been 3,5m long...

 

The only picture I can get of a "large" Falcon with "optical" head is always from the same source, the USAF Armaments Museum at Eglin AFB...

post-4570-1236247011_thumb.jpg

On the one hand you can think that they, better than anybody else, would know what they are displaying.

On the other, you can't seem to find any other picture of such a configuration with clear nose.

 

Here is a picture of a real AIM-26B/GAR-11A with an AIM-4, it's very different from your pictures.

post-4570-1236245110_thumb.jpg

 

Just in case, here's an AIM-26A/GAR-11, you'll notice it seems shorter, and doesn't fit your pictures either.

post-4570-1236245275_thumb.jpg

 

If I were to take a bet, I'd say that what you have is a GAR-6.

Now, it does seem to be the same airframe in the first picture... how it did end up as a training round in Finland I haven't got a clue...

 

After examination, on the first picture the missile is too short to be 3,5m, it is simply a Rb-27, with the seeker head in a different color, as seen on the GAR-11A picture above.

 

For your second picture, you'll also note that the mention of AIM-24A is made into the remarks (http://marvellouswings.com/Aircraft/Missile/M-026/M-026.html), now if only someone could translate the chinese part, it probably would make more sense.

Edited by Gunrunner

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The AIM-26 Falcon was the only guided nuclear-armed air-to-air missile ever deployed by the USAF. Development of a nuclear-armed derivative of the AIM-4 Falcon family was first planned in 1956, when Hughes was contracted to develop the XGAR-5 and XGAR-6 missiles. These missiles were intended to be significantly larger than the standard Falcon (length/diameter increased from 2.0 m/0.16 m (80 in/6.4 in) to about 3.5 m/0.30 m (140 in/12 in)), and were to be used against high and fast-flying missiles and bombers. The two variants were identical, except for the guidance method - semi-active radar homing for the XGAR-5, and infrared homing for the XGAR-6. However, development was cancelled early in the design phase.

 

Development of a nuclear-armed Falcon derivative started again in 1959, when it was decided that USAF interceptors needed a head-on kill capability against enemy bombers. This dictated radar homing (IR seekers of the day could only home on hot exhaust), but this was considered too inaccurate for a conventionally armed missile. Therefore a low-yield W-54 nuclear warhead was planned for the missile, which was designated as GAR-11.

 

The GAR-11 was slightly larger, and significantly heavier than the original Falcon. Testing of the XGAR-11 proceded without problems during 1960, and in 1961, the GAR-11 became operational with F-102 interceptors. The nuclear warhead, and the inherent all-weather capability of the SARH guidance made the GAR-11 the most powerful air-to-air missile ever deployed. Detonation of the warhead was triggered by a radar proximity fuze.

 

However, the nuclear warhead also had a major disadvantage - the missile could not be used against low-flying aircraft over friendly territory. Therefore the conventionally armed GAR-11A was developed in parallel. The GAR-11A was relatively little used by the USAF, but was exported to Sweden (and license-built there) as RB-27.

aim-26a.jpgGAR-11 (AIM-26A)

aim-26b.jpgGAR-11A (AIM-26B)

 

In 1963, the GAR-11 Falcon missiles were redesignated in the AIM-26 series. The XGAR-11, GAR-11, and GAR-11A became the XAIM-26A, AIM-26A, and AIM-26B, respectively.

 

Improvements in radar-homing in the late 1960's made the AIM-7 Sparrow missile effective in frontal attacks. This fact, together with the AIM-26A's unsuitability against low-level threats, led to a quick phase-out, and by 1971 the AIM-26A was no longer in service. The Swedish RB-27 (AIM-26B) was used by J 35 Draken fighters until the late 1990's. In total, about 4000 AIM-26 missiles of both variants were produced.

 

 

Data for GAR-11 (AIM-26A):

 

Length 2.14 m (84.2 in)

Wingspan 0.620 m (24.4 in)

Diameter 0.279 m (11 in)

Weight 92 kg (203 lb)

Speed Mach 2

Range 8-16 km (5-10 miles)

Propulsion Thiokol M60 solid-fuel rocket; 26 kN (5800 lb)

Warhead W-54 nuclear fission warhead (0.25 kT *)

*The 250 T yield is the figure quoted by most public sources. However, according to a first-hand account of an individual who worked with the weapon, the true nominal yield was actually 1.5 kT.

Edited by starfighter2

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Interestingly enough, the "mystery" missile seems to be lacking something ahead of the fins that the AIM-26A/B have...

post-4570-1236247858_thumb.jpg

 

On the other hand, the training Rb-27 also seems to be missing these parts.

 

I'm trying to find pictures with good enough angles for size comparisons.

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does any body know what is written on this RB27 missile ?!? DML 7B ???

 

 

Blind , its a groundcrew training missile . You have to know that any swedish missile painted in green is also a training/dud round while the live ones are not , the mystery missile shown is indeed the RB-27 radarguided missile but RB-27 isn´t really the AIM-26B but a homecoocked version made on the AIM-26A as base.

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