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Atreides

Deus Ex:Human Revolution trailer

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The developers claim that it will be much like the first one, if so this should be awesome ! Edited by Atreides

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The first one is one of my ever favorites computer games. A true classic.

Amazing story with a great gameplay.

Unfortunately I doubt that this sequel will attain the finesse of the first one.

Developers are mostly dumbing down the franchise versions.

Most of us now are living in a console world with a joypad in our hands and sitting in a couch. Deus Ex doesn't fit in that world.

Edited by Von Paulus

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Well said Von Paulus

 

Loved the first one, never really got deeply into second, lost that dark hardcore feel. But I liked the Project:Snowblind, an spin-off shooter set in the same realm

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Sounds like the guy is trying for a Christian Bale-as-Batman vibe there.

 

Anyway, 2027 is a bit close in time for this stuff, but the game could still be good. This is just a cinematic, no gameplay, who knows what it will turn out like?

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Well the original was 2050 or something close to that, and the mechanical augmentations were obsolete. JC Denton was said to be 23 in the first one, do the math and you get 2027 for a birth year. Hopefully that means we'll have an already born Paul involved as a child.

 

I really hope they do a good job tying it into the first one, dealing with all the appropriate characters. Bob Page and Walton Simons laying the ground work for Deus Ex, the formation of UNATCO and the NSF, and Gunther Hermann better show up as another agent and already be paranoid about orange soda.

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Well the original was 2050 or something close to that, and the mechanical augmentations were obsolete. JC Denton was said to be 23 in the first one, do the math and you get 2027 for a birth year. Hopefully that means we'll have an already born Paul involved as a child.

 

I really hope they do a good job tying it into the first one, dealing with all the appropriate characters. Bob Page and Walton Simons laying the ground work for Deus Ex, the formation of UNATCO and the NSF, and Gunther Hermann better show up as another agent and already be paranoid about orange soda.

 

I have always been paranoid about orange soda...

 

Hopefully this will be more like the first one than the second...

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Deus Ex: Human Revolution

 

GamesCom featured an all-new demonstration of Human Revolution. In brief, it is now my most wanted game currently in development.

 

When I previewed Human Revolution for RPS a few weeks back I was given the same two-level walkthrough they showed at E3, and the Eidos developer present completed it in an identical way. I said then that if they really wanted to show of their game’s Deus Ex-itude, they should complete the same level multiple ways.

 

That’s what Eidos were doing at GamesCom. They showed a new level from early on in the game- a Detroit police station, with you tasked to retrieve some hardware from the skull of a corpse in the morgue- and completed it once in a Terminator all-guns-blazing style, once smooth-talking their way past obstacles peacefully with the new conversation system, and a third time with hacking and ninja stealth.

 

This and Guild Wars 2 were the only games at the show that had me forgoing academic and factual note-taking for just writing “YES” and “YESSSS” in my notebook over and over.

 

It’s not just that Human Revolution offers multiple paths. It offers more of exactly what Deus Ex offered. The detail in the environments, the chance to talk to an idle population of civilians, the option of nosing through emails- that sense that you’re not just playing through a level but roleplaying a very cool guy in a very long black coat in a very absorbing world.

 

The menu was brought up at several points, too. There really is still a grid inventory. But there are so many additions, too- you now have 21 individual augmentation slots, and most seem to have their own tiny tech tree that you cherrypick your way down.

 

Something else that shocked me is the new hacking minigame. It’s dramatically complex- a kind of Uplink strategy battle where you first hide from and then race a server, with extra programs and viruses that can be found or bought and give you a helping hand. Similarly, the dialogue is fast paced to the point of being difficult to follow. I was expecting just about anything from Human Revolution except for it to be more demanding than the original Deus Ex. I couldn’t be happier. When was the last time you saw a great PC game being adapted to consoles and becoming more complex in the process?

 

Alright, that’s enough from me. I need to start transcribing interviews and turning all this brain-mess into genuine previews.

 

Gentlemen! Adieu.

 

 

Source: http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2010/08/21/gamescom-10-report-day-3/

 

I hope he's not being delusional. I could.

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Another trailer:

 

 

One thing is for sure, the ambiance is getting good.

It's smells 100% cyberpunk. Now we only need the gameplay of the legacy, and will have a classic of the classics.

I'm dreaming....

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A Small interview:

Eidos Montreal is bringing back the critically acclaimed PC franchise Deus Ex. Its game is on the road to becoming more than just another first-person shooter, it could redesign and redefine the entire FPS experience.

PSM3 sat down with Jean François Dugas, the director of Deus Ex: Human Revolution, and discussed what his title could mean for the genre.

 

So, what defines Deus Ex?

 

Choice and consequence, cyberpunk and augmentation. There's more than that, but that's keeping it short!

 

You've retained so much of the original game for Deus Ex 3. Was it so ahead of its time that those things still work today?

 

screenshot_237190_thumb300.jpg I think it was ahead of its time in certain aspects. Players like to figure things out by themselves and they like to experiment; I think that's kind of timeless. They want to feel smart about their experience and they want to feel, 'Oh, I thought about it and it worked' and that's what made it so powerful: that's also what we're trying to capture again.

 

The first Deus Ex was one of the first games that really brought that type of choice to gamers, and I think that's something that all gamers want.

 

Was there anything about the original game that obviously had to change?

 

Not really. We didn't want to reproduce the game exactly as it was back then, but rather recreate the aspects in a fresh and new way. We just went in and went back to the first two games, saw what was working well and analysed what would keep the essence of Deus Ex alive but at the same time fit a modern, global audience.

 

Does that mean hardcore PC gamers can call it 'consolified'?

 

Absolutely not. I think PC is a great platform, but I think consoles are a great platform, too. Back in the '90s, games on the two platforms were very different, but I think these days it's all about bringing things together - movies, TV, music - they're all converging in the same places for everyone to access. I see it as convergence, and it's the same for games.

 

We didn't think, 'Oh, it's coming to console; it has to be easy'. We can have a very deep experience, but it's important that if you want to just jump in to it, you can jump in to it. It's not about removing complexity or cutting possibilities: it's about the way the complexity is introduced.

 

Deus Ex has been around for so long; why has nobody done a good job of imitating it until now?

 

Because... God... making a game like that is a great challenge. It's fantastic and exciting but it's a lot of work and you need a very dedicated team. You need so many systems and all of those systems need to talk together. You often have to produce maps before the systems are functional, so you'll have routes play-testers can't explore because they can't move boxes or something. And then you'll have to balance the augmentations so that every player gets to experiment and nobody ever gets stuck. You have to iterate and iterate and iterate. It's a challenge. It's a big challenge!

 

Source: http://www.computera...e.php?id=263274

Edited by Von Paulus

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