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UK_Widowmaker

Matt's first Jousting Lesson

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And he's been asked to attend the Tournament in October, which takes place in Nottinghamshire as a 'Squire' (which he's very excited about)...hahahahaha

 

 

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He was a bit gutted he couldn't gallop (not allowed) until properly trained for obvious reason's!.....lol

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That is great WM! Full marks to Matt for wanting to learn the art of the joust. Be sure to post a video of his first tournament event. Very cool. :smile:

 

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Yeah, I bet he would have loved to attack in full gallop!

But they may not have so many teachers to replace the wounded!

Mmuahahahahahahaaaaa!!!!

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He was a bit gutted he couldn't gallop (not allowed) until properly trained for obvious reason's!.....lol

As I understand jousting, (in medieval times) they used bigger horses; more like Percherons or Shires, since these horses had to be able to campaign all day long carrying a rider, 100+lbs. of armor, and weapons. But these big horses aren't fast. A cavalry charge back then moved at a brisk cantor. It would seem that using a modern thoroughbred at a full gallop would be quite dangerous. Are injuries frequent? Which is to say, as frequent as Rugby?

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As I understand jousting, (in medieval times) they used bigger horses; more like Percherons or Shires, since these horses had to be able to campaign all day long carrying a rider, 100+lbs. of armor, and weapons. But these big horses aren't fast. A cavalry charge back then moved at a brisk cantor. It would seem that using a modern thoroughbred at a full gallop would be quite dangerous. Are injuries frequent? Which is to say, as frequent as Rugby?

 

Frequent mistake...Shire type Horses never even existed in Medieval Times, and most horses, even those carrying mounted Knights, were not much more than about 13-14 hands, and Nimble, quick animals.

The stuff about Shire Horses, and Knights being lowered onto Horses using a Block and Tackle, is Victorian Story telling.

 

If you look at the Bayeaux Tapestry, you will see that the Mounted Knights feet almost touch the floor....this was also true of Full Plate Armoured Knights in later centuries...Yes, the Horse had work to do, but as a full charge would only really occur, once the enemy were within about 200 yds, it was much more usual, for a full Gallop to be attained, to punch through enemy infantry.

 

In Jousting, the Horse's tend to meet at a fast canter, due to the Tilt being quite short, and Balsa tipped lances are used... but, yes...still quite dangerous.

In Medieval Jousting, very dangerous indeed...but then, so was Medieval life! :biggrin:

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No way in hell I'd even get on a horse--no matter what its size--let alone to joust! My hat's off to Matt. :salute:

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That should be a mandatory hobby for modern day aristocracy. If somebody refuses to participate, he should be stripped of his rank. Make them earn their upkeep, like they did in Medieval times! :biggrin:

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That looks cool. I'd love a go at that. After a local common riding, there's nothing quite like the sound of a large group of horses thundering across a field to get the blood pumping.

 

Didn't they reckon that Henry VIII was hurt in a joist? He got a splinter in his eye, or a head wound perhaps, and that's about the time his weight began to increase and he had quite a marked change in temperament and started bumping off his wives and people who didn't agree with him, and decided to go to war with France. Some people reckon he got a brain injury when joisting and it altered his personality.

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Indeed Flypc...though, there's some 'discussion' as to whether it was a Jousting injury...or the Syphallis that drove him slightly Bonkers...I suppose, like many things...it depended on whether one considered him a 'Hero' or a 'Whore' :biggrin:

(checkout the Stampede Stunt Company)...they take absolute Novices, even ones who have never ridden..and do Horseback Archery as well...great fun!...next time, I'm going to have a go too!

 

http://www.stampedestuntcompany.co.uk/

Edited by UK_Widowmaker

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...they take absolute Novices, even ones who have never ridden..and do Horseback Archery as well...great fun!

...next time, I'm going to have a go too!

Oh dear! A Camel Jockey on horseback, trying to perform synchronised twin-archery throught inbetween the horses ears! ...

It'll end in tears! ...

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Oh dear! A Camel Jockey on horseback, trying to perform synchronised twin-archery throught inbetween the horses ears! ...

It'll end in tears! ...

 

WW1 Pilots did it every day

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Widow, that's amazing. Damn if I'd let anybody I care about (and whose medical bills I pay) do jousting. I've seen it done and there are almost always all sorts of broken bones, concussions, dislocations, internal injuries, etc. Fingers crossed your boy survives with only cuts and bruises :drinks:

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You know in the Return of the King from the Lord of the Rings, when the Riders of Rohan line up for a charge on the Orcs? As Theodin rides along clattering the lances with his sword? I bet you any money, those riders would have charged at anything, - the Russian guns like the Light Brigade or the Scots Greys at Waterloo. There is just something hypnotic about a change on horseback, once you start, nothing will stop you.... or so you think.

I remember one particular rideout, there was a knot of horses getting through a gate and a bit of a bottleneck formed, but as the hoses all fed through, it felt like your horse grew a foot in height and they all just took off across the field and the thud and rumble of the hooves was just incredible. The only thing that's felt kind of similar is your state of mind after a parachute drop. There's so much adrenalin pumping, you'd storm any barricade and never feel the bullets.

 

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Widow, that's amazing. Damn if I'd let anybody I care about (and whose medical bills I pay) do jousting. I've seen it done and there are almost always all sorts of broken bones, concussions, dislocations, internal injuries, etc. Fingers crossed your boy survives with only cuts and bruises :drinks:

 

Yes indeed...well, he's only 14 yrs old..so, they would never allow him to joust fully...it was more of a Holiday experience day....and, he's just being a Squire in Nottingham. I would never allow him to Joust for real until he's 18 and old enough to make his own decisions as to whether he's mad enough to pursue the sport

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WW1 Pilots did it every day

But less than 50% survived Basic Training. (Still...archery on horseback sounds quite appealing)

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