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Maps, Missions, and Campaigns

New maps, missions, and campaigns for OFF / Combat Flight Simulator

73 files

  1. WOFF Westen Front Airfield Maps

    This is the second version of my airfield mapping for Wings: Over Flanders Fields. Credit goes to Rabu for his Flanders map that he has allowed me to use to map airfields on. The Paris map was created entirely by myself. The others were public domain and the airfield data came from WOFF itself. Please do not repost or change and distribute without crediting rabu and myself.

    141 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  2. WOFF Default Keyboard Controls

    Here is a quick sheet I compiled showing all the default keyboard and joystick controls in Wings: Over Flanders Fields

    134 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  3. Lothar Maps

    This mod offers several alternative in-game maps for Over Flanders Fields based on modern Google imaging:
     
    Lothar Google Map – Google’s Terrain map illustrating basic topography with modern cities and roads, much of which hasn’t changed from a map-eye view over the past century. While there’s a hint of the underlying topography, this is generally best for flying by human landmarks.
     
    Lothar Google Earth – Google Earth satellite imagery was a long way from even hypothetical during the Great War, so this mod applies diffusion and texture filters for a slight painted canvas map effect. Important locations are marked as on the stock OFF map, but overall this is best for just flying by terrain.
     
    Lothar Google Mix – This simply overlays the two above maps with transparency. Things may not line up exactly, especially at the extremes of the map, but overall this provides a subtler view of the road and city detail of the Google Map with more of the geographical richness of the satellite view.
     
    In any case, the result is vastly more detailed, accurate, and useful than the stock OFF map, despite the occasional anachronism. Try them all to see which you prefer on utilitarian and aesthetic merits. And have fun exploring with fresh eyes the amazing terrain Over Flanders Fields and beyond!
     
    Requires:
    Over Flanders Fields
    http://overflandersfields.com
     
    JoneSoft Generic Mod Enabler 2.6.0:
    http://combatace.com/files/file/13045-jonesoft-generic-mod-enabler-jsgme/
     
    Installation and Usage:
    The installer automatically extracts the mod folders into your OFF JSGME mods folder if OFF and JSGME are installed correctly. JSGME will be run when installation is complete, just activate the ‘Lothar Google Map’ or ‘Lothar Google Earth’ or ‘Lothar Google Mix’ folder to enable the mod. It only makes sense to activate one of the map mods at a time, but you can easily switch between them with JSGME.
     
    Notes: The front no longer displays in the Briefing Room, but does so (and more accurately) on the in-flight map.
     
    Credits:
    http://combatace.com/user/48442-lothar-of-the-hill-people/

    123 downloads

    1 comment

    Submitted

  4. Lothar Names

    Expanded and cleaned-up names files for Over Flanders Fields and OFFbase. Greatly increases the number of unique names for these campaigns, and also skews distributions so some more common names are more likely to appear in-game.
     
    Statistics: This mod increases the number of unique American names in OFF: Hat in the Ring from 68,068 to 109,538, and unique British names from 60,648 to 150,336. The number of unique German names blooms from just 11,850 in the original OFF: Between Heaven and Hell, to 116,446 in HitR by including Creaghorn’s German last names, to a robust 457,380 with this mod. Take note: there are still only 68,730 unique French names—if someone else wants to take a crack at it.
     
     
    Requires:
     
    Over Flanders Fields
     
    JoneSoft Generic Mod Enabler

     
    Credits:
     
    Original files by OBD Software, with HitR including Creaghorn’s expanded German last names from his Homebrew.
     
     
    Installation and Usage:
     
    The installer automatically extracts the mod folders into your OFF JSGME modsfolder if OFF and JSGME are installed correctly. Activate the mod folders manually in JSGME, or the Mod Manager included in the OFFice campaign editor will take care of it all automatically.

    93 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  5. Original 1916 Map of the Lens Sector of France

    .
     
    Here is the next in the series of WWI British ordnance survey maps: the Lens Sector of France, Map 11. I’ve again assembled this one from many high quality screen captures of the original example, which resides in the Lloyd Reeds Map Collection of McMaster University’s online library, (my sincere thanks to that fine institution for providing this and many other original WWI maps free of charge). After reassembling the image I cleaned it up a bit and it's now ready to work along side the Tournai and Hazebrouck maps.
     
    Again, I hope those of you who fly OFF using paper maps and compass will find this wonderful old map useful.
     
    Cheers!
     
    Lou
     
    .
     
     

    51 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  6. Original 1916 Map of the Tournai Sector of Belgium

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    Due to the amount of interest in my recently posted map scan of the Hazebrouck sector of Belgium and France I am now offering a full-sized image of the next map to the east: the Tournai Sector, Map 5. I’ve assembled this one from about 60 high quality screen captures of the original example, which resides in the Lloyd Reeds Map Collection of McMaster University’s online library, (my sincere thanks to that fine institution for providing this and many other original WWI maps free of charge to those of us who study on such things). After I reassembled the image I made a fair amount of “repairs” and cleaned it up considerably and it now serves as a fine companion to the Hazebrouck map.
     
    Again, I hope those of you who fly OFF using paper maps and compass will find this wonderful old map useful.
     
    Cheers!
     
    Lou
     
    .
     
     

    59 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  7. Original 1916 Map of the Hazebrouck Sector of Belgium

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    Recently I was fortunate enough to acquire an original 1916 map of the Hazebrouck sector of Belgium and thought I would share my good fortune. After an afternoon of scanning and assembling a couple of dozen clips I can now offer a full-size copy of this wonderful old item. This is the same type of map as used by RFC and RNAS pilots and observers, and this particular example covers the area from St. Omer across to Ypres and points south, (about 40 miles x 30 miles). I hope those of you who fly OFF using paper maps and compass will find this highly detailed old chart useful.
     

     
    Cheers!
     

     
    Lou
     

     
    .
     
     

    93 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  8. Modified OFF Missions from Bletchley's Files

    (revised 31/3/2012)
     
    All of these files come from the original "Bletchley's mission mods".
     
    I only adjusted the mission files. So, this basically is a rearrangement of missions from the original HiTR to not only match "Bletchley's mission mods", but also to avoid the scattering of waypoints when a mission is started.
     
    Now you can complete a mission using the waypoints on the map and it will be recorded as a sucessful mission. All missions will have wingmen, so no lone wolf mission types.
     
    Installation:
     
    Use JSGME to install these files - thanks to OlPaint01.

    57 downloads

    0 comments

    Updated

  9. Bletchley's AA MOD

    A gradual progression in accuracy and density of AA bursts as you progress from 1915 through to 1918.
     
    When the campaign transitions from one date period to another just de-activate the current file and activate the next one.
     
    I use this mod by selecting 'Normal' in Workshop settings for an 'active' front, 'Easy' for a 'quiet' front and 'Hard' for balloon attack missions. But on each workshop setting there is a gradual progression in accuracy and density of AA bursts as you progress from 1915 through to 1918, so you can just stick to one workshop setting if you prefer to use it this way, or find your own combination of settings.
     
    This mod works well with my earlier mods, as it changes different files and settings, but. It will not work with any other AA mods that are installed via JGSME into the WWI Scenery folder.
     
    Bletchley

    39 downloads

    1 comment

    Submitted

  10. Reims to Colmar - Part 4

    This map was made after an American WW2 map.
    The railways were pretty much the same, and the map works fine for OFF.
    I have added many airfields.
     
    The map consists of 4 parts, which can be used as single letter sized prints,
    as well as glued together to one bigger map.

    33 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  11. Reims to Colmar - Part 3

    This map was made after an American WW2 map.
    The railways were pretty much the same, and the map works fine for OFF.
    I have added many airfields.
     
    The map consists of 4 parts, which can be used as single letter sized prints,
    as well as glued together to one bigger map.

    30 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  12. Reims to Colmar - Part 2

    This map was made after an American WW2 map.
    The railways were pretty much the same, and the map works fine for OFF.
    I have added many airfields.
     
    The map consists of 4 parts, which can be used as single letter sized prints,
    as well as glued together to one bigger map.

    29 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  13. OFF Reims to Colmar - Part 1

    This map was made after an American WW2 map.
    The railways were pretty much the same, and the map works fine for OFF.
    I have added many airfields.
     
    The map consists of 4 parts, which can be used as single letter sized prints,
    as well as glued together to one bigger map.

    35 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  14. OFF Map Lao - Reims

    This map is mostly useful for German flyers.
    It shows the area from St.Quentin (top left corner), to Reims in the bottom right half.
     
    Some German airfields in this map, and some of the Jastas there (among others):
     
    Boncourt: 14, 21, 50
    Chambry: 2, 26, 27, 36
    La Selve: 13, 15
    Marchais: 14
    Puisieux Ferme: 4, 6, 10, 11
    Sissone: 1, 9, 21, 50
     
    The roads are the yellow lines.
    More useful for navigating in OFF are the railroad lines (black). Enjoy!

    36 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  15. 1917(2) OFF MOD

    Corrects a very small error in v.1. There are no other changes.

    124 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  16. 1918(3) OFF MOD

    New missions. 1918(3) August-November. At the beginning of August the initiative passed back to the Allied armies. In the British sector Haig was planning an assault on the Amiens front -an attack by the British Fourth Army and French First Army, with massed tanks and aircraft to replace the long preliminary bombardments of the previous year. Air activity was increased on all British sectors, to conceal the point of attack and push back German recon. aircraft from the front. Bomber squadrons, heavily escorted, were tasked to attack airfields and rail centres - activity that was to be strongly, if selectively, opposed by large numbers of German fighters flying in groups of 20 to 40 aircraft, above the low-flying two-seaters on ground attack, counter-battery and contact patrols. The British and French offensive was launched on 8th August, concealed by a heavy ground mist. The German Army was taken by surprise, and Allied forces advanced by up to 8 miles on the first day. The British two-seaters concentrated on contact patrolling, counter-battery work and bombing behind the lines, whilst the fighters were used for ground attack and close offensive patrols. By 11th August, however, German resistance and reinforcements had brought the Allied attack to a halt. The British and French armies had advanced 12 miles. At the end of August another British and French assault was launched - this time, towards Bapaume with an assault to capture the Arras-Albert railway line along 33 miles of front, and a French assault between the British sector and Soissons. The aim this time was to overwhelm German forces and drain them of the capacity to counter-attack by attacking along a wide front. Bapaume fell on the 29th August, Peronne on 1st September. This sustained assault forced the Germany Army to retreat back from the Drocourt-Queant line to prepared positions further back, with Lens abandoned on 3rd September. On 12th September US forces launched at attack on the St. Mihiel salient, which was captured after just two days of fierce fighting. This was followed by a lull in the fighting, as preparations were made for the final Allied assault to break through the Hindenburg Line. Air fighting was intense throughout this whole period, and up to the end of October. The assault was finally launched with an attack towards Cambrai on the 27th September, followed by an attack in Flanders between Dixmude and St. Eloi on the 28th, and on the Hindenburg Line between Cambrai and St. Quentin on the 29th. By the beginning of October the Germany Army was in retreat, in almost all areas, although the air above the battlefield was still being strongly contested by the German fighter wings. On the ground, however, resistance was now crumbling fast, and German columns were in retreat along the roads back to Germany....

    117 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  17. 1918(20 OFF MOD

    New missions, May-July 1918. The German offensives on the Aisne, the Matz, and the Marne. During this period the technological pendulum started to swing back towards the Garman air service once again, as increasing numbers of the new types, and particularly the Fokker D.VII, started to give the German pilots an edge at high altitude over the Allied pilots. At the same time, however, the close infantry and combined armes support doctrines being developed and practised by both side brought the main focus of this air fighting right down to ground level, where the decisive moves were now being played out. After the failure to make a decisive breakthrough against the British Army in the north, the German focus of attention switched to the French sector. On the 27th May 1918 the German Army attacked the French and British positions on the Aisne. Within a few hours the Germans had punched a large hole in their line, crossing the Aisne and advancing for 12 miles, supported by ground attack and contact patrols flown by Schlachtstaffeln under an umbrella of near complete air supremacy provided by the Jastas flying above them. By the 29th May the German advance had reached Soissons, and was heading for Paris - only to be brought to a halt by US reinforcements rushed in to the defence at Chateau Thierry. This was followed by an Allied counter-attack at Bellau Wood on the 4th June, one that completely halted the German advance. The Germans once again shifted their focus of attack, and on the 9th June they launched their attack on the Matz. Once again they made swift early progress, 6 miles on the first day, but the French were ready for them this time and launched a counter-attack on the 10th July that halted the German advance. The Allied recon. and photo.recon work was intensified, as a further attack was anticipated, and the bombing of German rail centres began again, to try and disrupt the movement of German troops. When the third and final German attack was launched, it came on the 15th July, on the Marne against the French army around Rheims. But once again the attack was brought to a halt, on the 18th July, by an Allied counter-attack that pushed the German forces back right across the Marne. By the beginning of August Soissons had been recaptured and the initiative was once again in the hands of the Allies...

    127 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  18. 1918(1) OFF MOD

    New missions. 1918(1) January-April : German Spring Offensive in Pacardy and on the Lys. Poor weather in January restricted much British air observation, but as the weather improved it was clear, by February, that the German build-up was taking place against the British Third and Fifth Armies opposite the Cambrai salient. During this period Jagdgeschwader 1 was joined by two new German fighter wings, JG2 and JG3, to give the German air service a numerical superiority for the first time. But they were remaining quiet, for the most part, trying to conceal the extent of the build-up of air units in this sector, only bombing the British rear areas by night and sending out high altitude recon., photorecon. and art.obs. machines by day. The British responded to this build-up with a programme of intensive recon. and bombing of the German airfiels and rail network by day and by night. Fighter squadrons were also being used to attack airfields by day - in part, is an attempt to lure the German fighters into the air (mostly without much success). But the main work of the Corps machines was with their artillery units, ranging the guns on to enemy gun batteries, supply dumps and lines of communication in the front sectors. This was supported by the fighter units, flying squadron-strength 'Close' and 'Distant' patrols to keep the airspace over the front clear of German machines. On 21st March the German Spring Offensive was unleashed, aiming for Amiens. German two-seaters supported the attack with contact patrols, ground attack and art.obs., with the single-seater fighters flying above to protect them from air attack. As and when the weather allowed, British machines were also flying contact patrols and tactical recon. missions, with fighters flying line patrols and ground attack missions. The bombers were attacking rail junctions and bridges, mostly but not always, by night. After eight days of heavy fighting the German assault was held along the Amiens Defence Line, a line stretching from Mezieres to Ignaucourt and Hamel, and on 5th April the German attack towards Amiens was finally blocked, just ten miles short, at Villers Bretonneaux. On the 9th April the German focus switched to the Lys valley with a surprise assault on the weakly held British and Portuguese line in heavy mist. After the initial breakthrough and swift advance, this attack was also held, although in the ten days that it lasted the Germans managed to recover nearly all the territory lost to the British in the previouse autumn. By the end of April, however, both attacks had been halted. The Germans were aware, though, that a decisive breakthrough was still an urgent necessity - In April nearly 120,000 US troops had landed in France, to be followed by a further 220,000 in May and another 275,000 in June. German attention now switched again to the French sector, for one more throw of the dice before it would, finally, be too late...

    134 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  19. 1917(2) OFF MOD

    New mission, same new flak. 1917(2) covers the period May - December, starting with the winding down of the British Arras spring offensive and ending with the Battle of Cambrai in the autumn. During this period the French front was quiet, following on from the failure of Nivelle's offensive on the Aisne, and attention was now about to switch to the Flanders area. During one of the worst summers on record, wet and miserable, the British repeatedly tried to break through the well prepared German defences in Flanders - starting with the successful capture of the Messines-Wytschaete ridge in June, to prevent the Germans from gaining overlook of the preparations for the major British offensive of that year, the Third Battle of Ypres, that opened on 31st July but failed to make much progress, continuing sporadically after this initial failure into further assaults: on the Polygon Wood (end of September), Paschendaele Ridge (October), and then the Battle for Paschendaele itself between 30th October and 10th November. Finally, with the use of tanks, a partial breakthrough was achieved further south, at Cambrai, but it was ultimately a failure due to the lack of reserves needed to exploit the opening, and ended with a successful German counterattack south of Bourlon Wood. In this eight month period there was a considerable shift in air tactics on both sides of the line. The German air service, despite expansion by the end of the year to almost twice the size that it was at the start, was still struggling against numerically superior odds and an influx of British pilots now better trained, with technologically superior aircraft, and deployed in larger squadron-strength offensive patrols. To prevent the British regaining air supremacy over the vital 'active' areas of this front, the Germans responded by grouping their best pilots and Jastas into the first wing-sized formation, or Jagdgeschwader 1 "Richthofen's Circus", that could be moved along the front to wherever it was most needed. This had the effect, however, of taking the best pilots and units away from the 'quiet' sectors, and this allowed the British Corps machines to go about their daily photo.recon. and art.obs. missions in these areas with far less opposition than might otherwise have been the case. Both the British and the German air services also started to develop a doctrine of ground attack, a development of the 'contact patrol' into a full fledged 'battle' or 'protection' patrol aimed at the silencing or supression of the mg nests and hidden artillery batteries that formed the major obstacle to the advancing infantry (the product of a new doctrine of 'elastic' defence, developed first by the Germans along the Hindenburg Line and subsequently adopted by the British as well). Scouts, such as the DH5 and the Camel, were used for this by the British, whilst special 'Schutzstaffeln' two-seater units were used by the Germans. The period also saw the development of the first 'wireless intercept' missions on both sides, where the wireless signals from the enemy art.obs. aircraft were triangulated by listening posts along the line, and a pair or section of fighters, held at readyness, would be 'scrambled' to intercept (but often arriving too late). The British also extended the strafing and bombing missions into the German rear areas, targetting the lines of communication and airfields, whilst two-seaters would bomb the airfields and railway junctions by day and night. Despite these efforts the British had nevertheless failed to make a decisive breakthrough by the end of the year, and were about to be forced back onto the defensive as the German forces started to redeploy westwards after the end of the Russian campaign in the autum of 1917. The Germans knew that if they were to have any chance of winning the war in the west, they needed to strike now, before the USA's entry into the war tipped the balance decisively back in favour of the Allies...

    127 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  20. 1917(1) OFF MOD

    New missions, flak. 917(1) covers the period from January through to April 1917 : the withdrawal of the German army to the Hindenburg Line, the diversionary Battle of Arras and Nivelle's great offensive in the Champagn. It was a period in which an Allied numerical superiority in the air was pitted against a technologically superior and increasingly well organised but still outnumbered German opposition, as the expansion in the RFC and RNAS saw hundreds of the older machines and under-trained air crew flooding into France. In the first months of 1917 the German army took the strategic initiative, following a period of poor weather that hindered the Allied recon. activity, with a well planned 'scorched earth' withdrawl to a prepared defensive line. British recon. and photo recon. resources were stretched to the limit, with scouts being drafted in to take on some of the work, as they desperately photographed and mapped the new German trench systems, whilst other two-seater units covered the advancing troops with low level contact missions. The advance was harassed in many places by German two-seater aircraft doing the same, and by aggressive but sporadic attacks by the German Jastas (although many of these were now in the south, to cover French preparations in the Champagn region). So much British effort was going in to recon., and on escorting the recon. aircraft, that Allied bombing switched to night bombing, of rail and communication centres, with little in the way of day bombing. The British then launched their attack on the Arras front at the beginning of April. The Art.Obs., particularly counter-battery work, now had the highest priority, along with tactical recon. and photo recon. missions along the front, with some scouts once again being drafted in to do some of the recon. work and also to attack the balloon line. Heavily escorted day bombing now resumed, mostly against rail centres, to try and stop the Germans bringing forward reinforcements. As the British threatened to break through at Arras the Germans drew in air resources from the south of the region, and the now numerically strengthened German fighter force (including new types such as the Albatros D.III) started to take a heavy toll on the British Corps machines, bombers, long recon., and their escorting scouts. On 14th April the French launched Nivelle's long awaited offensive in the Champagne, but the Germans had advance knowledge of the detailed planning for this and it ground to a halt, after very heavy losses that tore the heart out of the French army. By the end of April the French were back on the defensive and fighting at Arras was winding down. But new British aircraft types such as the SE5 and the Bristol Fighter, deployed too little and too late to have a significant impact, were already in France, and others such as the Camel and the DH4 were on the way...the pendulum was about to swing again as the British, having survived 'Bloody April' with the offensive doctrine intact, and despite heavy losses in the air, prepared for a major offensive in the north.

    141 downloads

    2 comments

    Submitted

  21. 1916(3) OFF MOD

    New mission files. In late August the German air service is reorganised and the small scout sections are brought together into the first Jasta units. Boelcke returns, having recruited more pilots to form a new crop of fighter pilots, amongst them Manfred von Richthofen, and new scout types start to arrive at the front (starting with Halberstadts in the last weeks of August). This leads to a more aggressive attitude from September onwards, with flight or Jasta strength patrols starting to contest Allied domination of the sky over the battlefield. The British are still patrolling aggressively, despite the now inferior machines, with a policy of deep offensive patrols, long recon., and now frequent bombing missions to strategic railway junctions, airfields, and lines of communication. The photographing and detailed mapping of opposing trench systems also continues, with art.obs. and photorecon. by both sides. The German air service continues to send their solo photorecon. missions far into Allied airspace, but they need to fly ever higher as Allied flak becomes more effective, with the switch from Shrapnel to HE shells and development of better targetting doctrine and technology. By the end of the year the stage is now set for 'Bloody April' 1917, with the Allies struggling to push the German scouts back from their Front sectors where increasingly vulnerable Allied art.obs. and photorecon. machines are going about the daily task of registering the artillery, counterbattery, and photography...

    137 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  22. 1916(2) OFF MOD

    New mission types, new flak (Allied now switchinh from Shrapnel to HE).
     
    1916(2) will cover July-August 1916. In the July-August period the E.IIIs appear to have been mostly held back by a combination of the lack of leadership and example (the death of Immelmann and the temporary grounding of Boelcke), problems with the synchronisation gear of the gun (thought to be the reason for Immelmann's downfall), reorganisation, and low moral as a much reduced number of Fokker pilots were faced with the Allied build up to the Somme offensive. During the first two months of the battle of the Somme the Allies gained almost complete control of the air above the battlefield, until the tide started to turn again at the end of August with the introduction of the new German scouts, a new influx of pilots, and reorganisation of scouts into the more effective organisation of the Jasta system. 1916(2) will therefore present a two-month hiatus for the 'German' player, with mostly 'lone wolf' and solo defensive patrols over friendly territory (still one or two line patrols, but not as many). For the Allied player it will be more or less a continuation of the earlier period, January - June.

    125 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  23. 1916(1) OFF MOD

    New mission files, new flak files, for OFF 1916 January-July

    156 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  24. 1915 OFF MOD

    A MOD for Over Flanders Fields, for 1915, that includes a new Weather file, new mission files and new AAA weapon files.

    169 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

  25. 1918 National Geographic Western Front Map, Large Scan

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    Greetings All,
     
    Olham recently mentioned the scan of the 1918 National Geographic Western Front Map that I assembled from about 120 smaller clips and cleaned up for use when navigating in OFF. This is a high quality JPEG copy that I originally posted in another download link on the forums several months ago, and since it has been asked about I though it best to place it here to make it easier for folks to locate. This is a VERY large image, (7760 x 6550), so just be aware of that when you are downloading the RAR file and unpacking it. To use this map it is best to make a small clip of the AO you are currently assigned to fly and print it out, then use it as your cockpit map, just like our RL counterparts did back in the Great War. Enjoy.
     
    Cheers!
     
    Lou
     
    .
     
     

    123 downloads

    0 comments

    Submitted

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