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U.S., India Ink Airlifter Accord

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U.S., India Ink Airlifter Accord

 

 

The Indian and U.S. governments have signed a Pentagon-administered Letter of Offer and Acceptance (LOA) for six Lockheed Martin C-130J airlifters, with final closure of the estimated $800 million deal expected by midyear.

 

“It’s an important deal for the U.S. government and the Indian government. And for Lockheed Martin, it’s a milestone event,” said Robert Trice, senior vice president for corporate business development at Lockheed Martin, during a Jan. 9 visit here.

 

According to Trice, the two sides are now working intensively to conclude details of an industrial cooperation package estimated at about 20 percent of the contract value.

 

India’s sole source for the C-130J program was a litmus test for Lockheed Martin with regard to future defense export potential. The anticipated conclusion of the deal bodes well for the firm as it prepares to answer Indian requests for proposals for a planned 126-aircraft fighter competition, he said.

 

“To my mind, if we can show that these two large bureaucracies can agree on a major equipment program, then we have a very strong chance in the fighter bid,” said Trice. If not, he added, “The idea of having a 126-aircraft fighter deal with India would be a tremendous long shot.”

 

Lockheed Martin India recently opened an office in New Delhi.

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How current is the purchase figure, ghost, because India Defence quote's the deal for the C-130J's being used pruchased for spec op's for a cost of upto 800+ million, drop that I say and purchase additional transport aircraft's maybe sign a deal for the extremely (though not spec op's capable) C-17, from all account's of the Indo-Pak war's that I've read about the Indian military's Achilles heel has been the lack of sufficient logistical support for it's large army.

 

But I digress (sorry), I'd imagine the Army must require; given the current cross-border threat's, spec op's purchase of these C-130J's. I wonder if they will come equipped with the Fulton gear (or even have that option available) or whether the Indian Army has ever used it when doing exercise's with the U.S armed force's ?

Edited by Atreides

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How current is the purchase figure, ghost, because India Defence quote's the deal for the C-130J's being used pruchased for spec op's for a cost of upto 800+ million, drop that I say and purchase additional transport aircraft's maybe sign a deal for the extremely (though not spec op's capable) C-17, from all account's of the Indo-Pak war's that I've read about the Indian military's Achilles heel has been the lack of sufficient logistical support for it's large army.

 

But I digress (sorry), I'd imagine the Army must require; given the current cross-border threat's, spec op's purchase of these C-130J's. I wonder if they will come equipped with the Fulton gear (or even have that option available) or whether the Indian Army has ever used it when doing exercise's with the U.S armed force's ?

 

The C-130J is a mission optimized machine for the Special Forces, and is not being procured to serve in the traditional transport role. A lot of specialized electronic equipment has been crammed into the aircraft. (See the attached PDF)

The Indo-Russian MTA will be replacing the AN-32 fleet. I feel the airlift capability hs improved over the years, Operation Cactus & IPKF Ops in Sri Lanka are shining examples of this. Why buy C-17s when you still have IL-76s?

India became interested in the C-130J during exercises with US Special Forces. Niether the An-32 nor the IL-76 has the ability to do spec ops missions.

In late 2006, there was some talk about the IAF showing interest in the C-17, hence its appearance at Aero India 07. I think the IAF backed out when Boeing mentioned the unit cost. Besides Heavy airlift capability is being fulfilled by IL-76s(some of them have been upgraded).

India_07_33.pdf

Edited by ghostrider883

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man, that really counter balances the entire 16 x F-16 to Pakistan debate, eh? See, we will gladly sell arms to you guys as well! And dont forget our new for 2011 F-35!

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man, that really counter balances the entire 16 x F-16 to Pakistan debate, eh? See, we will gladly sell arms to you guys as well! And dont forget our new for 2011 F-35!

 

 

Maybe this will even things up (from: http://www.f-16.net/news_article2691.html)

 

January 9, 2008 (by Lieven Dewitte) - Lockheed Martin, which is trying to sell its fighter aircraft F-16s to the Indian Air Force, on Wednesday announced opening of its India subsidiary that will market all its operating systems in the country.

 

Lockheed Martin India Pvt Ltd, a fully owned subsidiary of the Bethesda-based parent company, would have former diplomat Douglas A Hartwick as its Chief Executive, who had earlier served as Assistant US Trade Representative for South Asia, a company release said.

 

The US firm is pitted against major companies from Sweden, Russia and France, all of whom are expected to submit their proposals for the IAF's multi-role combat aircraft tender by March this year. IAF is looking to acquire 126 multi-role jet fighters. The US and Indian governments are expected to sign a contract by this March for the supply of six C-130J Hercules transport aircraft for the IAF, valued at about USD one billion, Hartwick's predecessor Royce Caplinger said recently.

 

Projecting his company's growth plans in India, he had said that Lockheed Martin was striving to establish its brand in India as "a reliable supplier for India's defence needs."

 

According to the Indian Times, Lockheed Martin was also in talks with the Indian Navy for collaboration in several areas. The company's interests range from cooperating in the IT sector with DRDO as well as other Indian firms in areas other than defence like education and healthcare.

 

Along with the FICCI and University of Texas at Austin, it recently launched the Lockheed Martin India Innovation Growth Program in Kolkata, which was aimed at accelerating innovative technologies in the global market. Another initiative has been a joint venture with Wipro called Network Centric Operations Centre set up in Gurgaon.

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It would be really cool if the F-15K or is it SK sold to South Korea was on the table for sale to India but, that would never happen as that would mess up the balance of power in the region from the U.S perspective and China and Pakistan would probably cry foul at the very thought of it. Got to love diplomacy.

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Still .. there's a huge difference when F-16s are sold to a terrorist loving country and when weapons are sold to country that's been the victim of that terrorism. One uses it to support terror operations whereas other would use to fight against terror.

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Once again accounting trickery raises its ugly head. That price must include spares, training, and probably maintenance and lifecycle costs for 20 yrs. There's no way even SpecOps MC-130Js cost that much for just 6.

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Govt clears largest defence deal with US

 

While India recently bought naval vessel USS Trenton, now rechristened as INS Jalashva, for about $50 million, there has been no military aircraft deal with the US in over five decades. The old Fairchild C-119s were the last lot of American military aircraft that India got in the 1950s. Thereafter, India’s transport fleet has largely been made up of Russian aircraft from the Antonov and Ilyushin series.

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* Come on, man...we need to keep the production line open...*

 

Ha ha, Jedi Master is just a little tired...he meant of COURSE you need C-17's and lots of them, they can land on sand you know, heck they can even back up! And if you act now we will throw in some Vipers too!

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I'm sure pretty much any country with a medium-sized or larger armed forces could use something the size of a C-17. The questions are 1) did they formulate a requirement that made it thru the beauracratic process and 2) can they afford a $200m+ plane, let alone at least 3 which is what most countries do when they decide to get one?

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I'm sure pretty much any country with a medium-sized or larger armed forces could use something the size of a C-17. The questions are 1) did they formulate a requirement that made it thru the beauracratic process and 2) can they afford a $200m+ plane, let alone at least 3 which is what most countries do when they decide to get one?

 

what's the point in acquiring C-17s when Il-76s are doing the job more cheaply for the IAF.

These c-130s fit into a category between An-32s and IL-76s in terms of payload capacity.

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dude...that is what the USAF has been saying...now we have 40 year old as the average age for our tankers

 

vicarious learning is the most pure form of learning...dont make our mistake...drive your iL-76, but start the acquisition process now

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Better yet, sell off all your planes all your tanks, keep some rubber boats. All you need thesedays are ak, RPK, PRD, .50, lots of RPG and explosives, some MANPAD and alot of martyrs.

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IED factory...never understood the term HME IED as in home made explosive IED...seems redundant in a way...I mean if its improvised explosive device, then that sums it up as being improvised...

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what's the point in acquiring C-17s when Il-76s are doing the job more cheaply for the IAF.

These c-130s fit into a category between An-32s and IL-76s in terms of payload capacity.

 

Which was exactly my point, the C-130s were bought because they needed a plane in that class. You don't buy a C-17 to do a C-130 job when you could buy the same number for less or more for the same price. Being a newer design I'm sure the C-17 would be nicer than the Il-76, but they don't need them.

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I don't know, I'm still not sold on the P-8. The idea a twin-turbofan can do the job of a quad-turboprop...

The P-3 shuts down 2 engines and cruises at very low speeds on patrol to save fuel and extend loiter time. What can a 737 do to compete with that? It may have the same loiter time at lower throttle numbers, but I think it will fly higher and faster as a rule and only have that loiter time by having vastly larger amounts of fuel onboard.

I never learned why the P-7 was cancelled, it seemed a better fit.

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Still .. there's a huge difference when F-16s are sold to a terrorist loving country and when weapons are sold to country that's been the victim of that terrorism. One uses it to support terror operations whereas other would use to fight against terror.

 

I second that. Diplomacy has an uncanny way of suiting political agendas. Look how Osama came out to bite the U.S in the rear. And now he's down some rat-hole in the very country that is a cesspool of terrs while the most powerful nation in the world twiddles its thumbs in an indulgent quandary.

 

We made friends with the wrong people. We should atleast face that truth. The aeroplanes are just a means to an end, no matter how base or noble the cause.

Edited by Stick

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