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F-16 2 seater IAF

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Guest Joedarkness

I've been looking and I haven't been able to find a 2 seater version of the F-16 flown by the IAF or any other country. Could someone please point me in the right direction or just message me the file. Thanks!

 

Joe

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Guest Joedarkness

2 weeks :grin:

 

we just making the final touches and weapons

 

 

post-15260-0-47002100-1344617358_thumb.jpg

post-15260-0-20219100-1344617377_thumb.jpg

 

 

YESSSS!!!! I'm so looking forward to this.

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Modder still waiting your model IAF Barak Block 40 & Soufa Block 52++

Edited by Wrench
all caps is shouting, and considered quite rude!!

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2 weeks :grin:

 

we just making the final touches and weapons

 

 

post-15260-0-47002100-1344617358_thumb.jpg

post-15260-0-20219100-1344617377_thumb.jpg

 

after finishing f-16 pack,will there be a new f-15 pack?

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nope MiG 29 :D

If I have understood you will do MiG-29 Pack. MiG-29UB will be include?

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yes , that is our plan i hope we can pull it true

 

- MiG-29

- MiG-29B

- MiG-29UB

- Mig-29S

- MiG-29SM

- MiG-29K

- MiG-29KUB

- MiG-29M

- MiG-29SMT

- MiG-29UBT

- MiG-35

 

there may be some changes to the list

Edited by ravenclaw_007

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Mig-28 too? :wink:

 

impressive list there V.

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So indeed....new PC..so I got one. Pls Ravenclaw bring those high poly babies to life. :king: :sohappy: :biggrin:

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  • Similar Content

    • By guuruu


      View File Static F-16 scene
      F-16 static object.
      ===============
      You can add this scene to your airbases.
      HOW TO USE IT ?
      ------------------------------
      1. Copy files to your MODS folder.
      2. Follow [add to -------] READMEs (add to SOUNDLIST, add to terrain _TYPES).
      3. Use Mue's TargetAreaEditor to place F-16 on your map.
      CREDITS :
      -----------------
      1. 3d is mix of free 3d models available in net.
      2. Ground crew adapted by GKABS.
      3. Testers: Wrench,
      4. All bugs by guuruu.
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      Submitter guuruu Submitted 11/03/2020 Category Ground Object Mods  
    • By guuruu
      F-16 static object.
      ===============
      You can add this scene to your airbases.
      HOW TO USE IT ?
      ------------------------------
      1. Copy files to your MODS folder.
      2. Follow [add to -------] READMEs (add to SOUNDLIST, add to terrain _TYPES).
      3. Use Mue's TargetAreaEditor to place F-16 on your map.
      CREDITS :
      -----------------
      1. 3d is mix of free 3d models available in net.
      2. Ground crew adapted by GKABS.
      3. Testers: Wrench,
      4. All bugs by guuruu.
      Have fun.
      Wojtek
    • By MigBuster

      The F-16XL was a design named after………..a golf ball………..that being the Top Flite XL for any who ever played Golf. Harry Hillaker was also a golfer….one with a problem in that the USAF wanted to use his A-A fighter (F-16A) in an A-G role, hanging lots of pods and bombs off it, which was just not on! 
       
      So, what did he do and why?
      He and his design team at General Dynamics redesigned the F-16 to be more suitable to an A-G role using such concepts as high internal fuel loads and conformal carriage of weapons to get that nasty drag and radar cross section right down. In fact when he first started going to the Air Force with plans for the XL they were so enthusiastic about it they apparently accused him of holding the design back so that they (General Dynamics) could sell the F-16 twice.
      Goals to improve operational effectiveness included:
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      •    Increased survivability, though increased speed, manoeuvrability and low radar cross section.
      The idea was to replace the F-16 and remain a lower cost fighter to the high cost F-15.
       
      So, some concept demonstrators were knocked together for testing?
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      Were the goals met?
      Most of them, the low drag weapons carriage and lots of internal fuel meant vastly improved range over the F-16A (that already had comparative long legs), carried more A-G weapons, with ability to lug along 6 x A-A missiles on top. High AoA handling and instantaneous turn was improved. Cruise speed was also improved. 
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      Is there a but here?
      Yes using the F100-PW-200 engine from the F-16A, it was a tad underpowered, more F-14A than F-16A………..so take off requirements were nowhere near and some of it’s A-A capability was a bit degraded you could say.
      Perhaps an example from one of the Red Eagles pilots who flew some BFM against it in a MiG-21F-13:
      [Red Eagle Matheny flying the MiG] “We briefed each other about our airplanes and they [Edwards F-16XL pilots] turned to me and said they would be all over me – they had a roll rate of 800 degrees per second, which was the fastest in the inventory. – I got to thinking about that and it turned out the roll rate meant nothing. The problem with that airplane[F-16XL] was that it was a big bleeder: it just bled speed like nothing else when forced to turn hard – I ate them alive in the MiG-21. The F-15E on the other hand was a pretty good performer – they resisted the urge to get slow and jump in a phone booth with a MiG. They flew around the ranges at low level trying to burn off all this gas and he still needed to burn off more when we joined up on each other”.
       
      Could they not have improved that somewhere?
      Potentially, the second F-16XL had higher thrust F110-GE-100 engine but unfortunately the majority of the evaluation data and the Dual Role Fighter evaluation was done with the lesser thrusted F-100-PW-200. In fact Harry Hillaker stated they were not allowed to use the GE engine in the evaluation (see below) for whatever reason. NASA later got it supercruising with a F-100-GE-129 (29,500 lbs class), and by the late 1990s both General Electric and Pratt & Whitney offered suitable engines with a potential max thrust class to 36,000lbs and 37,000 lbs respectively.
       

       
      Was there some competition against the F-15 at some point?
      There was a USAF competitive evaluation originally called the Enhanced Tactical Fighter (ETF) competition, which in 1981 was renamed to became the Dual Role Fighter (DRF) competition. Technically not really a competition because both were evaluated and flight tested to totally different sets of conditions and to different flight test plans it seems.
       
      Why did the USAF run this evaluation?
      It was felt by some in the USAF the F-111F was becoming a bit outdated and instead of just an upgrade they wanted something that had A-A capability and a good precision night strike role against the Soviet masses.
       
      So, they chose two short assed fighters to replace the F-111?
      Pretty much – they would both get LANTIRN eventually and have a good A-A capability but still lacking in range.
       
      Surely the F-16 was cheaper was it not?
      On unit cost and cost per flight hour yes – but the USAF considered the F-16XL a radical new airframe compared to the F-15E, which was considered just a modification, so the USAF estimated research and development cost would be higher for the F-16XL.
       
      Okay but in the end the F-15 was chosen as the winner and that was that.
      No – following the DRF decision that the F-15E was going into production in February 1984, the USAF announced its intention to put the Single seat F-16XL into production anyway with the designation F-16F. So, work began on the F-16F design concept and Full Scale development into 1985.
       
      So where is it then?
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      End of the F-16XL – not quite
      The two F-16XLs were given to NASA in the late 1980s for various types of flight testing and we can thank them for taking some time to research into the history of the F-16XL and providing useful information on it. 

       
      But there’s more
      An interesting rebuttal, ten years after the DRF, written by Harry Hillaker in response to an article in Aerotech News and Review which perhaps gives a passionate and better insight into how farcical some of these things can be:
       
      As the recognized “Father of the F-16,” and Chief Project Engineer during the concept formulation and preliminary design phases of the F-16XL and Vice President and Deputy Program Director during the prototype phase, the article was of considerable interest to me. The disappointment was that only one side of the issue was presented, a highly biased, self-interest input that does not adequately, nor accurately, present the real story of the selection of the F-15E.

      First, it should be understood that we (General Dynamics) did not initiate the F-16XL as a competitor to the F-15E, then identified as the F-15 Strike Eagle. We stated as unequivocally as possible to the Air Force, that the Dual-Role mission should be given to the F-15: that the F-15 should complement the F-16 in ground strike missions in the same manner that the F-16 complements the F-15 in air-air missions. A fundamental tenet of the F-16, from its inception, has been as an air-air complement to the F-15—no radar missile capability, no M=2.0+ capability, no standoff capability: a multi-mission fighter whose primary mission was air-surface with backup air-air capability.

      We proposed the F-16XL as a logical enhancement of its air-to-surface capabilities. The F-16C represented a progressive systems enhancement and the XL would be an airframe enhancement optimized more to its air-surface mission—lower weapons carriage drag and minimum dependence on external fuel tanks. 
      The statement that “a prototype version of the F-15E decisively beat an F-16 variant called the F-16XL,” is misinformation. I don’t know what was meant by “beat,” it is patently true that McDonnell-Douglas clearly won what was called a “competition.” However, by the Air Force’s own definition, it was, in reality, an evaluation to determine which airplane would be better suited to the dual-role mission. In a formal competition, each party is evaluated against a common set of requirements and conditions. Such was not the case for the dual-role fighter. The F-15 Strike Eagle and the F-16XL were evaluated and flight tested to different sets of conditions and to different test plans—no common basis for evaluation existed.
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      In a meeting that I attended with General Creech, then TAC CINC [Commander-in-Chief], the general stated that either air¬plane was fully satisfactory. When asked why he and his staff only mentioned the F-15 (never the F-16XL) in any dual-role fighter statement or discussion, he gave a reply that was impossible to refute, “We have to do that because the F-16 has a heart and soul of its own and we have to sell the F-15.” I’ll have to admit that I sat mute upon hearing that statement because there was no possible retort.
      We had no allusions as to what the outcome of the Dual-role fighter “competition” would be and debated whether to even respond to the request for information. We did submit, knowing full well that it was a lost cause and that to not submit would be an affront to the Air Force who badly needed the appearance of a competition to justify continued procurement of the F-15—they had patently been unable to sell the F-15 Strike Eagle for five years. As is the case with too much in our culture today, the Air Force was more interested in style, in appearances, than in substance.

      Even today, I feel that giving the F-15 a precision air-surface capability was proper and badly needed. What continues to disturb me is that the F-16XL had to be a pawn in that decision and had to be so badly denigrated to justify the decision—a selection that could have been made on its own merits.
       
      And finally 
      The concept of retaining performance with a usable Air to Ground loadout lives on today in the form of the F-35 Lightning II.......which comes with a 43,000 lbs thrust class engine to start with.
       
       
      General Dynamics F-16XL  (F2275)
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Sources
      Page 267 Red Eagles (Davies.S), Osprey publishing 2008 - Matheny flew the MiG-21F-13 against the F-16XL and F-15E concept demonstrators. 
      Elegance in Flight (Piccirillo.AC), 2014 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) – Chapter 7: The Dual Role Fighter competition. 
      Code One Magazine, July 1989 (General Dynamics) Vol 4 No 2 -The F-16XL flies again 
      Code One Magazine, July 1991 (General Dynamics) Vol 6 No 2 – Interview with Harry Hillaker
      1999 Aviationweek online: http://aviationweek.com/awin/pws-229a-edging-close-500-hours
      Pratt&Whitney's self-funded F100-PW-229A - a re-fanned F100 fighter engine that can produce as much as 37,150 lbst. - is edging close to 500 total hours of run time

      1998 General Electric online: http://www.geaviation.com/press/military/military_19980907.html
      Designated the F110-GE-129 EFE (Enhanced Fighter Engine), the engine will be qualified at 34,000 pounds of thrust and offered initially at a thrust rating of 32,000 pounds, with demonstrated growth capability to 36,000 pounds.

       
    • By Spinners


      View File [Fictional] Gloster Javelin F.Mk56 'Dhanush'
      Gloster Javelin F.Mk56 for STRIKE FIGHTERS 2
      This is a simple mod of the Veltro2K's superb Gloster Javelin to give a fictional Javelin F.Mk56 'Dhanush' of the Indian Air Force with markings for the equally fictitious No.36 'Trishula' squadron and, in this revised upload, I've also included markings for No.14 Squadron (Bulls).

      BACKSTORY
      The expansion of the Indian Air Force during the mid-1950's saw the planned procurement of the Hawker Hunter fighter-bomber and the English Electric Canberra bomber in substantial quantities but Indian Air Force planners saw the lack of an all-weather interceptor as a problem and urged the Indian Government for increased funds for a suitable aircraft. Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru initially blocked the idea but soon agreed to allow a delegation from the Gloster Aviation Company to make a presentation to the Indian Government and the Chiefs of the Indian Air Force. 
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      1. From the AIRCRAFT folder drag and drop the Javelin56 folder into your Aircraft folder.
      2. From the DECALS folder drag and drop the Javelin56 folder into your Decals folder.
      3. From the WEAPONS folder drag and drop the 'BAAN' and 'TANK300_JAV' folders to your Weapons folder.
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      CREDITS
      As always, thanks to Third Wire for a great little game/sim.
      Special thanks to the prolific Veltro2K for producing 'the harmonious dragmaster'. 
      Thanks also to Paulopanz for the excellent skin used in this revised upload.
      Thanks to ghostrider883 for suggesting the 'Dhanush' and 'Baan' names and for suggesting the serial numbers used.
      And, finally, thanks to everyone in the wider Third Wire community.
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      Version 2 - 14/06/2020
      Version 1 - 12/02/2010

       
       
       
      Submitter Spinners Submitted 02/12/2010 Category What If Hangar  
    • By Spinners
      Gloster Javelin F.Mk56 for STRIKE FIGHTERS 2
      This is a simple mod of the Veltro2K's superb Gloster Javelin to give a fictional Javelin F.Mk56 'Dhanush' of the Indian Air Force with markings for the equally fictitious No.36 'Trishula' squadron and, in this revised upload, I've also included markings for No.14 Squadron (Bulls).

      BACKSTORY
      The expansion of the Indian Air Force during the mid-1950's saw the planned procurement of the Hawker Hunter fighter-bomber and the English Electric Canberra bomber in substantial quantities but Indian Air Force planners saw the lack of an all-weather interceptor as a problem and urged the Indian Government for increased funds for a suitable aircraft. Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru initially blocked the idea but soon agreed to allow a delegation from the Gloster Aviation Company to make a presentation to the Indian Government and the Chiefs of the Indian Air Force. 
      With the end of the Javelin production line looming Gloster were proposing two new export version of the Javelin Mk8 to India -  the F.Mk55 (Sapphire-enginned) and F.Mk56 (Avon-enginned) versions. Indian Air Force chiefs were very enthusiastic about the possibility of having its three main combat aircraft use the same jet engine (albeit the Javelin's Mk.205 Avon engines had a simple afterburner fitted) and urged Nehru to proceed with the purchase of 80 aircaft but Nehru demanded to meet the Gloster delegation himself to thrash out terms. Gloster cannily sent Graeme Kimmage, who had attended Cambridge University with Nehru, to conduct the negotiations and eventually secure a deal for 80 Javelin F.Mk56's. 
      Entering service with No.36 'Trishula' squadron based at Pathankot in 1958 the Javelins only really became a complete weapon system when mated with the indigenous 'Baan' (Arrow) air-to-air missile which entered service in 1960. From this time the Javelins quickly earned the most appropriate nickname of 'Dhanush' (bow) and saw  limited service over Goa (in the recconnaisance role) but played a major role in the 1965 war with Pakistan claiming several kills including three F-86's, one F-104 and six B-57's. However, with the MiG-21 entering service the Javelin's days were numbered and the Javelin force slowly faded away and by 1975 the popular and legendary 'Dhanush' had gone for good.
       
      INSTRUCTIONS
      1. From the AIRCRAFT folder drag and drop the Javelin56 folder into your Aircraft folder.
      2. From the DECALS folder drag and drop the Javelin56 folder into your Decals folder.
      3. From the WEAPONS folder drag and drop the 'BAAN' and 'TANK300_JAV' folders to your Weapons folder.
      That's it!

      CREDITS
      As always, thanks to Third Wire for a great little game/sim.
      Special thanks to the prolific Veltro2K for producing 'the harmonious dragmaster'. 
      Thanks also to Paulopanz for the excellent skin used in this revised upload.
      Thanks to ghostrider883 for suggesting the 'Dhanush' and 'Baan' names and for suggesting the serial numbers used.
      And, finally, thanks to everyone in the wider Third Wire community.
      Regards 
      Spinners
      Version 2 - 14/06/2020
      Version 1 - 12/02/2010

       
       
       
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