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Caesar

Tomcat Spin Recovery in SF2

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ALCON,

 

A little video I did just to give some insights to recover the Turkey from a flat spin in the event you find yourself in one in SF2.

 

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Honestly I was waiting for a more unprofessional slide to end it but can't have everything... :smile:

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This is some serious sh!t here. Great vid Caesar. You could do a series a new plane each week.

Edited by MAKO69

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I could try, but I'll be the first to admit, I've lost other aircraft to flat spins from which I couldn't recover. Might need more skilled virtual pilots to do other airframes they're more familiar with.

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Let's have eric do the hornet and probably dave Agree with the Viper. Im sure a lot of people are willing for the phantom.

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I'm not sure you can force the Bug into a spin; the plane can depart, but if memory serves, hands off typically is all you have to do to get it back in shape with all the computers it has running it. Viper typically doesn't unless you've got it in the wrong "category" (say, in a Cat 3 configuration and you leave it in Cat 1 - has happened before, I recall reading about the mishap), so I don't know if anyone will do those aircraft, but, say, the Phantom, Tiger, Crusader, other aircraft, it could help for players unfamiliar with the birds in the event they lose control.

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Super Hornet Problem solving:

 

If I disabled auto-flaps it'd work (which no, I won't), but this is how it goes:

 

1. Fly up until you run out of airspeed.

2. Let go of stick, but keep nose pointed upwards (eventually you'll even go negative speeds...)

3. Flaps assist greatly with the Super Bug (never tried it with a Bug though...)

4. Let nose point downwards, apply thrust and fly away.

 

In short it's impossible even on Hard FM to stall (I actually tried it after watching the video). Even pulling hard sometimes puts me close but nothing even remotely called "departure". I got close but hands-off the joker just settles, apply thrust and fly away.

 

Okay maybe a little more feeling for the Bugs:

 

1. You can hold the stick as long as you want but eventually the plane is going to stop spinning (and that's very short) and once you hands-off or relax on the stick, it'll settle and you can start flying again.

2. I've never been a real Hornet pilot so if anybody has and can force a departure... let me know as I think I may be not forcing it too much, but if not, then refer to #1 above.

Edited by EricJ

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Ceasar, Nice video I really enjoyed it, and found it very informative........I was surprised that the technique to recover from the stall is so much different than the technique used in most GA aircraft, the biggest difference being elevator back instead of elevator forward to break the stall..? that, and closing the throttle as opposed to opening it as you would in a small propellor driven aircraft to recover from a fully developed spin.

 

Can anyone please explain to me exactly why elevator back is the correct procedure in an aircraft like the F-14 (and I presume other similar types) ....I mean aerodynamically what exactly is pitching the nose up doing to help recover.

 

Cheers

Romflyer

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For me pitching the nose down exerts downward inertia on the jet, thereby forcing it to fly as gravity pulls your jet down and therefore it'll stop moving around so much.

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Well, forward stick is the standard NATOPS first step like what I used in I believe it was the third departure. If no recovery, stick into spin direction. If the spin gets worse, that's when you go to aft stick, lateral into the spin. For whatever reason, stick forward and rudder counter slows the spin in SF2, but always seems to fail to actually kick the bird out, while aft stick with counter rudder and eventually stick into spin direction works damn near every time. I could try it with forward stick, counter rudder and lateral stick into the spin as well, just found that stick aft seems to work better. Real world, however, one of the most effective ways to recover the F-14 from a developing flat spin, apart from hands off at the incipient phases, was to manually sweep the wings aft. This both lowered the amount of lift being generated, caused the aircraft's center of gravity to push further back, and the jet would typically be under control in about 6500 feet, nose down (based on real world examples). With regard to the engines, based on the bold face, they are idled to prevent a compressor stall, or in the event one already suffered a compressor stall, but the other was still running, to prevent that engine from exacerbating the spin due to asymmetric thrust.

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For me pitching the nose down exerts downward inertia on the jet, thereby forcing it to fly as gravity pulls your jet down and therefore it'll stop moving around so much.

Yes, that is basically what I was saying about lowering the nose to break the stall..........but thats clearly not the technique which was working in Ceasar's video.

 

EDIT

Ceasar bet me to it on the answer.

Thanks for the clarification Ceasar......that clears up my question

Edited by Romflyer

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And here's where I can't say he's wrong, but I prefer to do it like that, and it's worked since Flanker 2.5, so is his way wrong? No, but as said it works for me and I stick with it.

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Very professional and informative! I learned a lot from this, and I really appreciate the upload. Thank you

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Romflyer,

 

Just to let you know, forward stick with stick into spin does work, but it doesn't work as well as aft stick. This somewhat emulates the "piss-poor" NATOPS procedure (to quote certain Turkey drivers) in that the bird will stop spinning with rudder against spin, stick forward, lateral into spin, but you need positive airspeed for this to happen. If the bird is reading negative airspeed, go stick/rudder neutral, wait for positive, then go rudders counter, stick forward, then as the bird slows, stick lateral into spin. Real world, if this doesn't work, that's when you pull stick aft, rudder counter, stick lateral into spin (SAS On if off) and the bird should start righting itself, based on the bold-face. Both work in the SF2 world, but stick aft works better.

 

V/R,

Caesar

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