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Tiger Shark Eats Man in the Bahamas - 09/08/2010

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Just as the deep sea fisherman was about to cut the hook from the shark’s wide open mouth and let him go, out jumped a human foot. “Everything was intact from the knee down,” said Bahamian investment banker Humphrey Simmons, “it was mangled, but there was still flesh on the bone.” That ended a day of fishing for Mr Simmons and his two companions who spent most of the morning trying to get away from sharks.

 

 

It is not clear if the person was dead or alive when eaten by the 12' shark. The shark was caught 38 miles south of New Providence Island last Sunday morning.

 

From the Bahamas Tribune--

 

Monday, September 06, 2010

 

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

 

By EILEEN CARRON

 

By the time the unusually heavy Tiger shark was landed at the Defence Force’s Coral Harbour base and his distended body cut open, the body of a man, minus his head, was found. The leg that the shark had regurgitated was the man’s left leg. Inside was his severed right leg, two severed arms and a torso in two sections.

 

Obviously, as Mr Simmons’ 10-year-old daughter observed, this shark had its prey all to himself. There was no sign that another shark had fought over the body. It is believed that the man had drowned before the shark swallowed him.

 

Fishing from 30' Pursuit

 

Mr Simmons, of Cable Beach, a banker with Xanthos Investment, and his two deep sea fishing companions — Keith Ferguson and Stanley Bernard — left Marshall Road, South Beach before 6am Saturday in Mr Simmons 30-foot Pursuit, “Azulardo.” “We went 35 miles south of Nassau and started fishing about 7:45am,” said Mr Simmons. “After about 45 minutes we pulled up a fish, and a shark took it.

 

“We left the area and went two miles further south and let out the lines again. Keith pulled up his line and before reaching the surface the shark had broken the line.” The weather was calm with winds about 4mph blowing from the southwest.

 

“I always watch that before I go out,” Mr Simmons laughed.

 

Trying to get rid of the sharks, Mr Simmons moved again, this time about two to three miles further south. By then they were about 38 miles from Nassau.

 

“While pulling up my line,” he said, “I noticed that it was extra heavy. I called “Boy” (Stanley Bernard) and asked him to go get the shot gun.”

 

 

The tiger shark caught on Sunday south of Nassau:

shark_98b.jpg

 

 

 

Investment Banker Thinks Like the Shark

 

By then the men were fishing in water about 1,000 feet deep. They had decided against landing the shark because there was too much tension on the line.

 

“I then thought about what might have been going through that shark’s mind,” said Mr Simmons. “Usually when you catch a shark on the line, and are pulling him up, when he sees sunlight, he heads back down, and either cuts the line or breaks it.

 

“While pulling him up there was also a grouper on the line, and he was trying to get the grouper, but I had both on my line. He came up with his mouth wide open, but he couldn’t get the grouper because it was also on my line.”

 

As the shark neared the surface, Mr Bernard shot him several times in the head.

 

“We tied the rope around his tail fin, and pulled him towards the boat.

 

Foot in Mouth

 

We were going to cut the hook out of his mouth and let him go when he regurgitated a human foot — intact from the knee down. It was now about 10am.”

 

The men then tried to get BASRA and the Defence Force, but could raise neither — “it was probably because they were out of range for our VHF radio,” Mr Simmons commented.

 

They decided to take the left leg and the shark to Nassau. “There was so much stink coming from the shark’s belly and the belly was so huge that we thought that there might be more bodies inside,” said Mr Simmons. At about 10.30am the men headed for Nassau, dragging the heavy shark behind. About a half hour later they saw a Defence Force boat and flagged it down.

 

The Defence Force’s Enduring Friendship vessel EF-28 pulled up alongside them, heard their story and took the shark on board. It was then about 11.30am when they followed the Defence Force boat to Nassau, arriving at about 12.30pm at the Coral Harbour base.

 

Three Men Missing

 

The shark’s body was offloaded, cut open and inside was the remains of a headless man. Mr Simmons said he was a “black man, of heavy build and heavy structure. He had neither clothes nor any identifying marks.”

 

Police are now awaiting DNA results to tell them if the remains belong to one of three men who are still missing at sea. The Royal Bahamas Defence Force said still reported missing are 62-year-old Frank Brown, Sr, and 47-year-old Delton Newton, who disappeared after their boat experienced engine trouble in waters off Clifton Pier last week. A man who disappeared from a boat in Acklins last week has also not yet been found. However, Mr Simmons said that Mr Frank Brown Jr stopped at his home, looked at the photographs of the body parts and confirmed that they were not those of his father.

 

 

Source: http://www.boattest.com/resources/view_news.aspx?newsid=4275

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True its terrible what happened to the man in this case but no-one knows if he was already dead when eaten or not...

 

But think about the sharks for a few minutes (this is one thing that does annoy the living hell out of me).

 

Tiger Sharks are the rubbish bin of the ocean... in other words they eat anything that comes their way.

 

And to put the record straight approximately 40 000 000 yes forty million the, upper limit some think is around a 100 million, sharks are killed every year by man for fins or are caught in nets... and thats only an estimate most of this is for their fins for the market in Asia for Shark Fin Soup... the Shark is caught finned alive and thrown back into the sea still alive in most cases so for 5% of the shark they throw away 95% of the shark.

 

So for every fatal attack by sharks roughly 10 worldwide we kill 40 000 000 (I am using the low figure)... somehow that number doesnt seem right the shark has a role in the ocean in culling seals and other animals... the problem is sharks aren't cuddly like baby tigers or have the smiles of dolphin, they are sharks from the moment they are born teeth and all. Most of this is down to Hollywood scaring us with the bad shark.

 

I have been fortunate that I spent 10 minutes in open ocean with a group watching one of the most beautiful sights I have ever seen in nature and that was a blue shark that came up to warm herself after hunting in the depths. She was 8ft long and was swimming in the most effortless way possible that it was one of those am I scared or in complete wonder... for me it was definitely the later.

 

So please don't hate the sharks they are only doing what nature meant for them to do, whereas man kills them for a $100 dollar bowl of soup...

 

The following link explains it better than I can

 

http://www.sharkattacks.com/sharksvictims.htm

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"As the shark neared the surface, Mr Bernard shot him several times in the head.

 

“We tied the rope around his tail fin, and pulled him towards the boat."

 

and...

 

"We were going to cut the hook out of his mouth and let him go when he regurgitated a human foot — intact from the knee down. It was now about 10am.”

 

I'm not a shark expert, but doesn't this sound a bit f***ing iffy? You shoot a shark in the head several times, and then you're preparing to let him go when he barfs up a leg? Is shooting sharks in the head and letting them go really believable?

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"As the shark neared the surface, Mr Bernard shot him several times in the head.

 

“We tied the rope around his tail fin, and pulled him towards the boat."

 

and...

 

"We were going to cut the hook out of his mouth and let him go when he regurgitated a human foot — intact from the knee down. It was now about 10am.”

 

I'm not a shark expert, but doesn't this sound a bit f***ing iffy? You shoot a shark in the head several times, and then you're preparing to let him go when he barfs up a leg? Is shooting sharks in the head and letting them go really believable?

 

To answer your question when a shark is severely hurt or killed there is a chance it will regurgitate its last meal something to do with a nerve reflex. Also a shark is a tough animal to kill depends on what load was in the shotgun I suppose but it could be a mis-interpretation for we killed it then we would have released it into the sea...

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That is some crazy stuff. I have seen a Tiger shark at sea only once ( i suspect it was a tiger, I was a shark fanatic as a kid and can identify them on the cuff fairly well) and it was close to nine feet long judging from the fin and silhouette and that was up here in the gulf of Maine. I feel for the man that was eaten, what a way to end up. I am also a Mr. Simmons so I found that story somewhat entertaining since I kept putting myself in the picture!

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Well, Tigersharks are more dangerous than Great Whites... hell, I've seen youtube videos of folks swimming with Great Whites and the sharks had no malicious interest with them at all... just a slight curiousity, but that's it. However, what's more dangerous than a Tigershark is a Bull Shark because they can also swim in fresh water areas as well and are also very aggressive.

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I'm sorry, but people in the water become part of the food chain, just as sharks in the water can easily become part of man's food chain. It's nature's law, plain & simple.

 

Besides, Mako steaks are great barbecued, baked, or broiled:

 

John_Mako.jpg

Matt_Mako.jpg

Edited by Fubar512

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I'm sorry, but people in the water become part of the food chain, just as sharks in the water can easily become part of man's food chain. It's nature's law, plain & simple.

 

Besides, Mako steaks are great barbecued, baked, or broiled:

 

 

To that I disagree totally... We are not on the menu of any shark as we do not have the rich blubber on us that seals for example have.

 

The majority of Shark attacks are sharks investigating us or mis-identifying us, we have hands to do that they use their mouths which is what causes the problems... If you are going to hunt a shark fine provided you eat it afterwards I have no problems with that but catching a shark and finning it and then throwing the 95% back into the ocean is what I disagree with and hunting them for sport is another.

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Being 'part of the food chain' has nothing to do if you're normally on the menu...it's a matter if you're edible and can provide nutrition.

 

Being on land or in the water provides no exclusivity on being eaten or not.

 

FC

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:yikes:

...so much stink coming from the shark’s belly and the belly was so huge that we thought that there might be more bodies inside,” said Mr Simmons.

That is the best working description of the paper bank-financial system I've heard yet.

 

Thanks!!

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:yikes:

 

That is the best working description of the paper bank-financial system I've heard yet.

 

Thanks!!

 

 

LMFAO! :lol: :lol:

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thumbs.gif

I like working definitions, they hit you in the gut. This one is an analogy. There is more dimension to it. Recall the classic phrase Wall Street Sharks, the ones dining on victims -- investors, manufacturers, pension funds, municipalities, private businesses, etc... Then, when the rotten system begins to collapse, the water is full of chum and the sharks are driven to eat each other; Lehman Bros here in USA for example, and more financial bodies float to the surface. USMC general Smedley Butler reserved special words for banks.

 

I'm saving this one. “There was so much stink coming from the shark’s belly and the belly was so huge that we thought that there might be more bodies inside,” said Mr Simmons.

:salute:

Man I LOVE that

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~> Morning coffee hehe. I wonder how far across the Atlantic is found the border where the ocean turns from coffee to tea: the so-called Atlantic CT boundary.

 

I was always a major hot tea drinker, I used to get a spiced tea brand -- red/black box Bigelow, but the last few years, just hot water, a squeezed lime and drop it in, and local Florida honey is all I need. Tea without the tea. I need to grow some mint again though. Strangely though, this morning, off work for a change, I brewed up my first coffee in like a year.

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Ah yes, Coffee...hmm

 

Can just about manage instant...but it's when they start putting Chocolate and pencil Sharpener contents on the top, that I move away! :good:

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Pencil shavings in coffee. Well at least its not really lead, just graphite. I'm thinking of sawring up some cedar boards and scattering around the sawdust, or drilling out cores to repel insects around the house. Never though of this before.

 

 

*This* fell out of Wall Street Journal (online) yesterday, by Citigroup chief economist Willem Buiter...they want to force negative interest rates (below the zero "boundary). How...?

 

~> http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704644404575481390712384072.html?mod=WSJ_hps_RIGHTTopCarousel_1#articleTabs%3Darticle

 

 

:

:

The first method does away with currency completely....etc...

:

:

The second approach, proposed by Gesell, is to tax currency by making it subject to an expiration date....etc...

:

:

The third method ends the fixed exchange rate (set at one) between dollar deposits with the Fed (reserves) and dollar bills....etc...

:

:

 

Buiter worked for Bank of England before joining Citi. The previous Citi economist left Citi to work for -- guess -- the United States Treasury. These guys get around. :good:

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hehe, found this off Drudge. New York Times vs Wall Street Journal. At 0:25, Rupert Murdoch animation appears with shark fin on back. :good:

 

~>

 

I used to like WSJ, before Murdoch bought it. Never bothered with NYT. The video is spots on about people going to internet and ignoring these newspapers. Folks now have the opportunity to think for themselves, but whether they do or not...well, lead a horse to water.

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HAHA Sunday Funnies. Mike Shedlock just put this up.

 

~> http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2010/09/sunday-funnies-2010-09-12-worthless.html

 

This story is making the rounds. Maybe it wakes folks up a bit. One fella/fellatte on Mish's forum offered the possibility the Citi economist was going to extremes to show how silly the flesh eating bankteria system works. Well I dunno. I've been thinking Greenspan did exactly that in spades over the years since Reagan....something about that guy (Span) is cool, just can't put my finger on it.

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I'm not a big fish-eater, very picky about the few fishy things I actually do enjoy to eat, but I've always had the philosophy that if it isn't part of our natural habitat, we should leave it alone. Umm, that'd also mean no peking duck or geese, but I'm fine with chicken and turkey for substitutes... I say: leave the fish alone!!

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Bears (land habitat) and birds (sky habitat) go fishing (water habitat). They know something Man (Citi-group habitat) has long forgotten.

 

LORD Jesus' disicples hauled up kilotons of fish. Eskimos kick nutritional Butt: Compare the Northwest Passage explorations of the tragic Franklin mass disaster and the Amundsen success. Amundsen and crew had to literally go Inuit, learning from the natives how to haul their own Arctic fish, and they succeeded in their mission.

 

I've been meaning to get back to fishing myself but never got round to it. When I came to Flarada the salt water fishing was a new universe from the fresh backwater Mississipie fishing. The most fun part, as amatuer astronomer, was always knowing the position of the moon in Earth's orbit, so I never carried a tide chart. The local salt water bubbas also couldn't understand how I got along without a tide chart. That was alot of fun.

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Another shark story slices above the surface...

 

 

Mystery of Disappearing Proprietary Traders: by Michael Lewis

 

:

:

:

Shark Watch

 

To see Wall Street turn its back on money is as unsettling as watching a shark’s fin veer away, and then sink from view. It leaves you wanting to know where the shark has gone, and why.

 

None of the firms have offered a good explanation for their new and seemingly improved behavior, but it’s not hard to think up several. From least plausible to most:

 

No. 1 -- .... :lol:

:

:

etc...

~ http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-09-30/mystery-of-disappearing-proprietary-traders-commentary-by-michael-lewis.html

 

Fun read. Read it.

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