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Capitaine Vengeur

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Everything posted by Capitaine Vengeur

  1. Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee dies at 95

    Now God shall enjoy the honor to be seated at the left hand of Stan Lee and Will Eisner...
  2. Senator John McCain dies at age 81

    A nice man - and a nice politician, which is less often. Heard from Europe down here, a welcome voice from America has fallen silent.
  3. View File National counters for Wings Over Europe This mod provides you with a batch of colorful, reduced-size, more immersive counters, devoted to each of the nationalities present in Wings Over Europe – and also to some that could be added. Besides having a more attractive map and less confused stacks, you can also find more easily the units you're after. As a rule, the counters with rectangular national flags and division devices show the ground units, while the counters with roundels concern the air units. Submitter Capitaine Vengeur Submitted 09/13/2011 Category SF/WO* Hanger/Menu/Loadout  
  4. This Cracked me Up....

    When I visited Kyiv a few years ago (before the 'events'), I was falling in love about 5-6 times per minute! Almost in the mood for cutting down my *** once back to very common creatures at my homeplace... Yet our guide, clearly a gentleman by Ukrainian standards, told us that these beauties usually don't last long, due to early pregnancies, heavy drinking, and fat-rich Ukrainian food! (I can't but agree for the food)
  5. LAPD Air Support Ride Along

    Quite tedious actually... These flat suburbs seen from the skies looks like an undifferentiated, boring square agglomerate of anything and everything, built at the same time by the same people, each area looking like the other one flown over 2 miles before. Tell me about flying over London, Paris, Lisbon, Rome, Athens or Budapest...
  6. Hurricane (Film 2019)

    "Poland has not yet died, so long as we still live." The Polish anthem seems to have been written for guys like these... Even while, actually, the 303rd's best scorer during the BoB was a Czech. The Battle of Britain movie showed Poles thrown into battle while unsufficiently prepared: problems with keeping formations, with radio protocols, and lack of fluency in English (a sequence in the movie, when a Pole warned for the Hun behind him, checks above first). Their spontaneous recklessness owed them great successes, but also great losses. At least, there were used to be provided with the least efficient of the available foreign aircraft fighters: in the French service during Spring 1940, their national squadron was fitted with the greatly underpowered Caudron C.714 (500hp!!). As a result, they scored little and lost many, while the Free Czechs, scattered between the active French squadrons, scored much more.
  7. If you watched 5th Element ...

    Luc Besson's current sci-fi movie "Valerian" is inspired from an old French comics, whose artist J-C Mézières designed several sets of "The Fifth Element". Most notably, the vertical city with crappy lower levels and audacious taxi drivers, and the flashy interiors of the space cruise ship can be found in some books by Mézières long before the movie. These comics have often been said to have inspired some of "Star Wars" sets (first and second trilogy). Not watched "Valerian" already, but it is said to be inferior to "The Fifth Element" in many regards but visuals (of course: no Gary Oldman, and I do not like the immature teen look of the "heroes" casted there - these comics made me dream as a child, with heroes being full grown-up adults; times are changing).
  8. Dunkirk

    I just watched it yesterday. The chopped, criss-crossed narration style is more interesting than the theme itself: quite disturbing at first, but finally, it makes the intense moments even more intense by the second part of the movie. I can see that footages were really shot on the actual place: the thick white clouds of salt foam on the beaches are typical when walking along this coast. Yet the weather was reported to be better here on this ending Spring 1940: an evacuation on a completely flat sea. Also one can see in the countryside modern cranes for containers, that look quite anachronistic. Good point for the absurd tight 'vic' formation of the RAF planes: hard this way to watch out for the Hun in the sun... All in all, a good movie, I won't say unforgettable. Gepard, an amusing part of "Week-end at Dunkirk" was the materialization of an Allied delusion of those days, with German spies of the 'fifth column' dressed as nuns! German spies were seen everywhere (in this new movie "Dunkirk" too, aboard the fishing boat), but nuns, hum, I don't think so...
  9. How to Behave in Britain

    I had read a recent edition of "A guide to France", booklet aimed at the GIs soon to land on the Old Continent. As expected, full of naïve preconceived clichés as well. It was hard enough to have rough cow-boys admit that they would not get laid with any French girl just by showing dollars and chocolate!
  10. Operation Opera 36 Years later

    As said above, Raz asserts that Yadlin, scheduled to be second to drop, cut his way at the last moment in order to be the first one. Raz was rewarded with a Chief of Staff Citation. As said in my Israeli Medals Pack, there were but a little handful of IDF combat pilots who were ever awarded the lowest-ranking medal (still highly praised as rarely awarded), or this highest-ranking citation ribbon.
  11. Operation Opera 36 Years later

    ...starring Ilan Ramon, the later first Israeli astronaut, as the junior pilot in the pack. A carefully selected pack, yet I had read an article about how awful was the private relationship between the leader Ze'ev Raz and his second in command Amos Yadlin.
  12. 35 years ago: roads to Beirut

    Yesterday was the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War, the pre-emptive strike which brought Israel to the shores of the Suez Canal and the old walls of Jerusalem and Hebron. A military feat still highly praised and studied to this day, while a political failure on some regards. Some dates seem to be significant in History, as today is the 35th anniversary of the seven-day campaign, also known as Opration Peace for Galilee, which brought Israel into the Lebanese quagmire. Triggered while the West's eyes were focused on the Falklands and the advance to Port Stanley, this offensive had the IDF complete within one week the advance on a terrible terrain that took in 1941 one agonizing month to the Australians (who started on a 8th of June; some dates in History, etc). The Bekaa Valley Turkey Shoot is still a legendary reference in the history of modern air warfare. Yet it does not seem that easy when you fly the Skyhawk in Wings over Israel's related campaign...
  13. Biggles Flies Again...!

    I mostly remember the sketch by the Monty Pythons: "Algy? Are you a poof? - I should bally well say so, old fruit!"
  14. Learn your callsign

    Blowing Scooter... Ooch! 'hurts my bum...
  15. 10 MAY 1972

    That day, Lt Randy 'Duke' Cunningham, VF-96, emerged as the first US ace pilot since the Korean War. He also ended the hectic day proving his worth as a competition swimmer when his F-4 turned into a one-way submarine. He just missed out by little on the Medal Of Honor, yet became the incarnation of the American hero America missed so much in those days. Later, he became a very unpleasant Congressman, and the incarnation of the crooked politician, and deserved every minute of his jail term. Wartime can reveal how much some people can be extraordinary, while return to peace later reveals how actually the same war heroes can finally be very, very common men. See 'Pappy' Boyington...
  16. The Great Standoff

    The bigger balls you proudly own, the more it hurts when you bang them into the table... The table always prevails...
  17. 100 years ago today: ... tomorrow the World !

    On 6 April 1917, the Congress of the USA approved the declaration of war against the German Empire - and prepared to take an active part into the most terrible war Europe had ever known then, far away from the coasts of Western Atlantic. Except for a few small-scale operations before (Mediterranean, Philippines...), it was the first time that this young nation, seemingly so isolationist and stuck to the Monroe Doctrine, planned to commit large numbers of troops out of the North American continent. Almost untrained and unequipped at that time, the Doughboys finally took a decisive part in the conflict by the sheer numbers of fresh and motivated troops they brought onto an exhausted Old Continent. This gave to President Wilson a prominent role in deciding what new Europe should look like. A quarter a century later, the States were as isolationist and the US Military (Navy excepted) as understrength and unprepared as they were in 1917. Yet 1917 had been a decisive precedent, and a first milestone in the USA taking an ever growing (somehow intrusive) interest in the rest of the World.
  18. Final dust off for Hal Moore

    ... And long life, 7th Cavalry !
  19. What sims do you play?

    At the moment, a lot of Elite Dangerous (do spacesims count?). Occasionally, some First Eagles 1, SF2:Israel or SF2:Desert Storm.
  20. Movie, Books, or Show Suggestions Please.

    Movies for "Silent Hunter" afficionados like me: Operation Pacific (1951), and Run silent, run deep (1958), good interiors and aspects of everyday life inside the US subs of the Pacific War; The enemy below (1957), same thing about life and combat action aboard the US Navy escort destroyers during WW2 - yet poor job regarding the German sub: prefer the classical Das Boot (1981). Movies about the Sengoku Jidai era (I'm playing much "Shogun 2: Total War" at the moment, too much I think): Kagemusha (1980), Ran (1985) - and other older classical gems by Kurosawa of course, but colour is really a must for this era's scenogrphy. Movies about the American Civil War I'm also fond of: Gettysburg (1993) and Gods and generals (2003), linked to each other - too bad they did not made the last part of the planned trilogy about the last months of the Confederacy. My favourite book ever about war seen from very close range: The forgotten soldier by Guy Sajer (1965), autobiography of a French-German conscript in the Grossdeutschland division between 1943 and 1945, who took part in some of its most terrible battles and deeds: Kursk of course, but also the apocalyptic crossing back of the Dniepr, agonizing Russian winters, partisan warfare with destructions of villages, naval evacuations on the Baltic Sea in 1945 with terror on heels... The book is said to be on the recommended reading list of the US Army Command College. The author later became a very prolific and one of my favourite comic book artists, producing of course several books about war but also comical series ironically located in the Soviet Union's gulag (a fate he escaped narrowly on several times).
  21. Something A Little Different

    Among my very favourite comic books of the moment is a French series, "Les Sentinelles", sometimes nicknamed "Robocop in the trenches": super-soldiers during World War One. I name this series here for matching with the theme: "Early 20th Century military steampunk / retro sci-fi", and because according to several articles in 2014, it was once planned to develop an anim film after the books. Yet by the end of 2016 things seem to evolve in a different direction; either delayed or cancelled, too bad anyway. The couple of dark paintworks below were actually studies for this project. The pitch, characters, and events... A few years before WW1, a fringe experiment by loosely supported elements of the French Army, known as the Sentinels Project, tried to take a decisive advantage from newly synthesized and still highly secret Dexynal, a powerful, yet very addictive steroid increasing immeasurably strength, stamina, reflexes, and painlessness. Some testers just received injections, but the first tests often had human guinea-pigs turn murderous or suicidal (or both). Other testers, never more than one at a time, combined Dexynal with a battery-powered endoskeleton enabling them to carry super-heavy armor – as well as the terrible weight of the batteries themselves. All of these super-soldiers in turn were given the same generic name of "Taillefer" (Ironcutter), and were tested during colonial minor operations. The most critical flaw was that even carrying 400lbs in batteries, the battery life was ridiculous, and the "super"-soldiers ran out of energy in the middle of the battlefield. The Project was terminated with drastic consequences for its promoters. On the eve of WW1, the Sentinels Project could get a second wind when a young and brilliant scientist, Gabriel Féraud, develops a very light radium-powered battery, with virtually unlimited life. Yet Féraud is a pacifist and refuses to sell his invention to the military. As the War breaks out, Féraud is mobilized, and critically wounded during the first fights. The promoters of the still unofficial and unsupported reborn Project manage to recover his carcass and extort from him the secrets of his battery, in exchange for the promise that they will rebuild him. He ends up cheated, for after long and painful clandestine surgical operations, he comes back to life as the new Taillefer: a mechanical monster. Now that's a trauma – for he is no Robocop: the body is Taillefer's, but the mind is still the pacifistic man of science's. Meanwhile, the Féraud family has been informed that Gabriel has died for his country. He knows he'll never try to see them again. Taillefer has four artificial limbs, an artificial spine, and a full endoskeleton supplying him with Dexynal. His almost complete armor, full-face helmet included, is bulletproof at any range; he can lift guns and throw trucks, he once fires heavy artillery at shoulder like a bazooka (quite badass!); his hydraulic hands can tear steel, his feet can crush concrete. Féraud is now a living lethal weapon, and he hates that. Still a pacifist at heart, he tries whenever possible to neutralize enemy threats and protect friendly troops without loss of human lives. Yet he sometimes lets him fall into the ambient madness; it then takes time for him to recover from this new trauma, and to accept what he has become: Taillefer. The second, chronologically first Sentinel, Adjudant "Djibouti" (real name unknown), is a career NCO who took part in the first tests of the Sentinels Project. A steady supply of Dexynal had turned him into a junkie, and he was dropped by the Army when the Project was aborted. Deprived both of Dexynal and of his only family, Djibouti once fell into dereliction and morphine addiction. Reincorporated as the Project was rebooted, he first acted as Féraud's guardian angel then Taillefer's mentor. Not wearing any prothesis or armor, his body just receives constant supply of Dexynal that keeps him a beast of war. Even without steroids, Djibouti is a natural-born warrior with innate tactical sense he proves more than once. Physically, with his Goliath build, heavy yet sharp profile, scars and ugly grin, he rather looks like Marv in "Sin City". Djibouti is nicknamed after the first place where he "wasted dudes" (there were lots of other such places thereafter). The latest-arrived Sentinel is an aristocrat pilot whom Taillefer and Djibouti met during the Battle of the Marne. A loud patriot, young Baron Hubert-Marie de Clermont can't refuse when offered a way to serve his country more efficiently. He becomes Pegasus, a kind a Rocketeer, with a removable solid propellant jetpack fixed directly to his spine. Strengthened with Dexynal, he is able to blast enemy aircraft like a human shell. IMHO, Clermont is a highly improbable yet quite interesting mix of Cyrano de Bergerac and Sonny Tuckson: a bombastic and big-sounding red-haired dwarf with a musketeer goatee, he is steeped in patriotic, aristocratic and chivalric values that appear more and more outdated along that War. His disillusionment, in the layers of gas at Ypres and in his own exhausting runs at Gallipoli, gives him a more human dimension. Djibouti uses to mockingly refer to Pegasus as "Robin". During the Battle of the Marne, the Sentinels have the same catalyzing effect as Vasily Zaitsev in Jean-Jacques Annaud's "Stalingrad". At first, we see a hopeless army, where demoralized soldiers just seek to get out alive of an irretrievable disaster. A lost cause… The Sentinels, with but limited action by themselves (a still non-violent Taillefer as a standard-bearer marching resolutely through storms of bullets to dumbfounded German machine-gunners), prove a formidable morale boost to the soldiers around them, enabling a local success that proves pivotal for the decisive victory on the Marne. The new heroes are loudly praised by the propaganda papers, stopping the rot. Of course, war is an arms race, and the Sentinels soon have to face an enemy response to the threat they represent. Übermensch is a German officer willing to avenge his sons killed by the French super-soldiers on the Marne. Steeped in old values, he hates this dishonourable new kind of war, but wants to chastise the French monsters with their own inhuman weapons. Injected with massive doses of German-made Dexynal obtained through espionage, he soon becomes much more powerful than Djibouti or Taillefer, able to swing a terrifying heavy mallet – but also much more addicted, forced to permanently live into an over-armored airtight suit filled with a gaseous form of Dexynal. Übermensch confronts the French trio at Ypres in 1915, but as a first raw response, he's finally no real match to them. Landed at the Dardanelles (Gallipoli) with the ANZACs, the Sentinels are to face a much more dangerous opponent, the Ottoman super-soldier Scimitar, equipped with German technology: heavy armor, jetpack, and two firesabers using the same solid propellant, able to cut in Taillefer's armor, and which can be turned into close-range flamethrowers. Also dressed with style, he is actually my favourite super-soldier. The propaganda artwork at the bottom illustrates the usual distortion of facts at war, as Gallipoli is wrongly depicted as a victory. True, the French supermen enabled the last ANZACs to re-embark alive against all odds, making theirs an Aussie wisdom in original language: "It's not over until it's over". Yet the three of them were unable to overcome Scimitar, who dominated the confrontation. Voilà. Four books at the moment. An amusing point, somewhat referring to media coverage in films like Paul Verhoeven’s "Robocop" and "Starship Troopers", is that each book ends with a few old newspaper-looking pages of propaganda, praising the feats of the Sentinels. Touched up black and white photographs, watercolored lithographies. Very immersive, very steampunk.
  22. Medals Pack for SF2: WW2 Finland

    Version

    38 downloads

    This pack is intended to complement The Dev A-Team's all-inclusive mod Strike fighters 2 WW2 Finland, dedicated to the aerial campaigns over the Gulf of Finland and the Barents Sea during the Winter War and Continuation War. You are given here extensive lists of awards with related medals and citations, and a handful of minor assets (alternative lists of ranks, counters, etc). Of course, all of this work could also complement ShrikeHawk's mod about The Continuation War, available at CombatAce's downloads for SF2. Three Medals lists have actually been designed for the Finns, the first one related to the Winter War (1939-40), the second to the first part of the Continuation War (1941-42), the third to its last part (1943-44). The earlier lists grant much more lenient criteria to be awarded the same distinctions you could also receive after 1942 spending more sweat, but above all prevent you to receive awards unavailable before they were established. For instance, besides harsher requirements, the 1943-44 list adds the Order of the Lion of Finland, established by the end of 1942, and also makes a few German decorations available when the Nazis at bay tried to forge closer ties with their loose co-belligerent. In the same way of thinking, two Medals lists are provided for the Soviets, 1939-42 and 1943-45 (several older designs before 1943, many new orders established mid-42 and awarded by 1943, harsher requirements for awarding after 1943). Of course, the WW2 Soviet packs could be used with The Dev A-Team's all-inclusive mod for SF1 Wings over Russia, and for any mods involving the Soviet Air Forces during WW2. You’ll just have to juggle with national Medals Lists according to the period of the War when you plan to start your campaigns. Regarding these lists, everything has been especially designed, when swapping files during an extensive career, for the decorations you were awarded with an older list both to be preserved with original look and citations, and not to be awarded a second inappropriate time thereafter. Don’t worry, everything is meticulously explained with several examples in my notes. As you can notice on the screenshots, I chose to have the citations display the decorations’ names in original language without subtitle. Who can read Finnish here, raise your hand? Be easy, the awards you deserved are still announced in English on the Debrief Screen, and listed in English on your pilot’s Medal List Screen. Finnish Air Force Mannerheim Cross (2nd Class) * Order of the Cross of Liberty (2nd, 3rd & 4th Classes) Order of the Cross of Liberty (2nd, 3rd & 4th Classes with Oak Leaf) * Order of the White Rose of Finland (Knight & Knight 1st Class) Order of the Lion of Finland (Knight & Knight 1st Class) ** Medal of Liberty (1st Class) Campaign Commemorative Medal [either one single of Winter War or Continuation War available] German Iron Cross (1st & 2nd Classes) ** German Pilot’s Badge ** Soviet Air Forces Gold Star Medal of Hero of the Soviet Union (2 possible awards) Order of Lenin (2 possible awards) ² Order of the Red Banner (multiple awards possible) ² Order of Suvorov (3rd Class) ** Order of Kutuzov (3rd Class) ** Order of Alexander Nevskiy ** Order of the Patriotic War (1st & 2nd Classes) ** Order of the Red Star (2 possible awards) Medal For Valor ² Medal For Combat Service ² Campaign Medal [either one single of Leningrad or Transarctic Theatres available, or just an unofficial certificate for the Winter War, lacking a better option] Membership of the Communist Party Wound red stripe (multiple awards possible) ** * Available by 1941 only ** Available by 1943 only ² USSR : older design before 1943 also available HAPPY NEW YEAR 2017 !!
  23. File Name: Medals Pack for SF2: WW2 Finland File Submitter: Capitaine Vengeur File Submitted: 01 January 2017 File Category: Menus This pack is intended to complement The Dev A-Team's all-inclusive mod Strike fighters 2 WW2 Finland, dedicated to the aerial campaigns over the Gulf of Finland and the Barents Sea during the Winter War and Continuation War. You are given here extensive lists of awards with related medals and citations, and a handful of minor assets (alternative lists of ranks, counters, etc). Of course, all of this work could also complement ShrikeHawk's mod about The Continuation War, available at CombatAce's downloads for SF2. Three Medals lists have actually been designed for the Finns, the first one related to the Winter War (1939-40), the second to the first part of the Continuation War (1941-42), the third to its last part (1943-44). The earlier lists grant much more lenient criteria to be awarded the same distinctions you could also receive after 1942 spending more sweat, but above all prevent you to receive awards unavailable before they were established. For instance, besides harsher requirements, the 1943-44 list adds the Order of the Lion of Finland, established by the end of 1942, and also makes a few German decorations available when the Nazis at bay tried to forge closer ties with their loose co-belligerent. In the same way of thinking, two Medals lists are provided for the Soviets, 1939-42 and 1943-45 (several older designs before 1943, many new orders established mid-42 and awarded by 1943, harsher requirements for awarding after 1943). Of course, the WW2 Soviet packs could be used with The Dev A-Team's all-inclusive mod for SF1 Wings over Russia, and for any mods involving the Soviet Air Forces during WW2. You’ll just have to juggle with national Medals Lists according to the period of the War when you plan to start your campaigns. Regarding these lists, everything has been especially designed, when swapping files during an extensive career, for the decorations you were awarded with an older list both to be preserved with original look and citations, and not to be awarded a second inappropriate time thereafter. Don’t worry, everything is meticulously explained with several examples in my notes. As you can notice on the screenshots, I chose to have the citations display the decorations’ names in original language without subtitle. Who can read Finnish here, raise your hand? Be easy, the awards you deserved are still announced in English on the Debrief Screen, and listed in English on your pilot’s Medal List Screen. Finnish Air Force Mannerheim Cross (2nd Class) * Order of the Cross of Liberty (2nd, 3rd & 4th Classes) Order of the Cross of Liberty (2nd, 3rd & 4th Classes with Oak Leaf) * Order of the White Rose of Finland (Knight & Knight 1st Class) Order of the Lion of Finland (Knight & Knight 1st Class) ** Medal of Liberty (1st Class) Campaign Commemorative Medal [either one single of Winter War or Continuation War available] German Iron Cross (1st & 2nd Classes) ** German Pilot’s Badge ** Soviet Air Forces Gold Star Medal of Hero of the Soviet Union (2 possible awards) Order of Lenin (2 possible awards) ² Order of the Red Banner (multiple awards possible) ² Order of Suvorov (3rd Class) ** Order of Kutuzov (3rd Class) ** Order of Alexander Nevskiy ** Order of the Patriotic War (1st & 2nd Classes) ** Order of the Red Star (2 possible awards) Medal For Valor ² Medal For Combat Service ² Campaign Medal [either one single of Leningrad or Transarctic Theatres available, or just an unofficial certificate for the Winter War, lacking a better option] Membership of the Communist Party Wound red stripe (multiple awards possible) ** * Available by 1941 only ** Available by 1943 only ² USSR : older design before 1943 also available HAPPY NEW YEAR 2017 !! Click here to download this file
  24. HAPPY NEW YEAR

    Bonne Année 2017! May your wishes come true... and your resolutions come true as well!
  25. I am sorry for that.

    So sad. I have always loved this choir's outstanding performance. When I think that the soldiers who found themselves carried alongside these artistic celebrities (true artists I mean, contrary to 90% of those usually called celebrities) may have thought: "Wow, how lucky I am today!..."
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