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ironroad

Just because you CAN do something...

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does not mean you SHOULD do something...

 

chris-hemsworth-red-dawn-poster-trailer.jpg

 

I may have considered buying a ticket (to use as toliet paper) if they kept China as the enemy (which seems more believable).

 

Why does Hollywood keep doing this, why does the consuming public keep allowing Hollywood to do this. Remakes or recent movies or remakes/squels of recent mediocore movies. You would think the self-absorbed relativity tv generation whould be feed up by now...

 

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For the same reason Homefront switched the enemies from China to N Korea...N Korea doesn't buy crap from us, and we don't buy crap from them.

 

China is a BIG market, and not only do they hope to sell these things there, they also don't want to offend Chinese authorities and risk their other products being cut off. In short, it's 100% business-related concerns. If it means they won't be able to make a buck off/in China, they won't do it. Gaining a small percentage of customers here will NOT offset the Chinese market, not even close.

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For the same reason Homefront switched the enemies from China to N Korea.

 

That actually sounded like an awesome idea, some fresh ideas for stories are good. But it would have made sense if the fate of S. Korea was also described/inserted in the story, kinda leaves you hangin'

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In Homefront it was a trick/forcible reunification, mentioned in the opening cinematic, that gave them the access to the South's economy fueling their power rise as they tried to make the idea of N Korea being able to invade the US sound NOT laughable.

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Hollywood has tradition of giving the bad role to the most commercially unsignificant nations having contentious issues with America at that moment, even if it can seem completely ridiculous when watched again one decade later. Remember that in the original Red Dawn (1984), some of the invaders were Nicaraguans! Damn, can you repeat it now without dying out of laughing!? Nicaraguans!!!! I am quite surprised that we don't find in this new 2012 version a new evil coalition of enemies of God, Freedom and the Holy Dollar, gathering ugly Venezuelan die-hard collectivists alongside the usual terrifying Cuban bogey.

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hey it seemed plausable at the time to have Cuban and other South Americans fighting alongside Soviet allies (overlords) Cuba had tens of thousands of troops fighting all over africa as proxies for the Soviets so if the big show happened in the 80's you just know that the recently converted marxist countries in South America and central America would be there if nothing more than clean up and garison roles.True though that after the fall of the Soviet union and the utter failure of communism in central america it does seem funny.

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This is a joke right? No this isn't a joke is it... Red Dawn is one of my favorite movies!

 

Really, North Korea? If Homefront was anything to go by, this will be just as terrible. And yet I'll probably still watch it anyway.

 

As for the poster, I understand the desire to teach actors trigger discipline and everything, but for the sake of realism couldn't they have just had their fingers on the triggers?

 

 

BTW, is Red Dawn on Netflix?

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As for the poster, I understand the desire to teach actors trigger discipline and everything, but for the sake of realism couldn't they have just had their fingers on the triggers?

 

I noticed that too, shows are showing trigger discipline more all of a sudden, even in the middle of a fire fight! some sort of gun political correctness? :P

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In the 80s, trigger discipline meant "pull until you run out of ammo, then yell and throw the gun". :biggrin:

 

As for South Americans in the group, it also meant being able to use all those Latino actors for stuff and not having to rely on only Russian-looking actors.

 

Of course, for this one I'm not sure how many Asian actors, extras, and stunt doubles they'll be able to come up with, although I'll bet you'll have a lot of non-Korean actors playing Koreans (which I guess is fine after decades of Korean actors playing Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese).

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Of course, for this one I'm not sure how many Asian actors, extras, and stunt doubles they'll be able to come up with, although I'll bet you'll have a lot of non-Korean actors playing Koreans (which I guess is fine after decades of Korean actors playing Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese).

which doesn't seem all that crazy, to me it's like Canadians and British playing as Americans or vice versa

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Except Canadians, Brits, and white Americans are all the same race.

 

Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, and Vietnamese are not. IIRC, Koreans and Japanese are close, but Chinese are not. Don't remember about Vietnamese.

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Except Canadians, Brits, and white Americans are all the same race.

ah, but sometimes I can spot a brit just by looking at his mouth. I can tell by the shape of their mouths, it's almost like they are a different race :P

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Except Canadians, Brits, and white Americans are all the same race.

 

Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, and Vietnamese are not. IIRC, Koreans and Japanese are close, but Chinese are not. Don't remember about Vietnamese.

Except Canadians, Brits, and white Americans are all the same race.

 

Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, and Vietnamese are not. IIRC, Koreans and Japanese are close, but Chinese are not. Don't remember about Vietnamese.

I remember an outstanding movie about the rise of Gengis Khan, Mongol (nominated for Best foreign language film, Oscars 2008), where the casting was indiscriminately made of Chineses, Mongolians, Siberians, Center Asians (Kazakhs, Kirghizes...), but also Koreans and Japaneses. The main character even happened to be a Japanese.

Edited by Capitaine Vengeur

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Case in point: Soon-Tek Oh. He's Korean (as the name indicates), although he was born in Japan. I'm not sure which languages he speaks fluently, other than accented English, but I've seen him play:

 

A Japanese officer in The Final Countdown.

A Chinese cop in Man With the Golden Gun.

Various Chinese characters on Kung Fu.

Japanese, Chinese, and who knows what else on Hawaii 5-0.

Koreans on MASH.

Japanese on Tales of the Gold Monkey.

Vietnamese on Hunter.

Mongolian on Stargate SG-1.

And of course an alien something-or-other on Babylon 5 (and he's clearly a human, so that was the biggest stretch so far :biggrin: )

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I remember an outstanding movie about the rise of Gengis Khan, Mongol (nominated for Best foreign language film, Oscars 2008), where the casting was indiscriminately made of Chineses, Mongolians, Siberians, Center Asians (Kazakhs, Kirghizes...), but also Koreans and Japaneses. The main character even happened to be a Japanese.

 

I saw that movie on Netflix. Awesome movie.

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