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R.I.P NEIL ARMSTRONG

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Neil Armstrong Dead: First Man To Walk On Moon Dies, Aged 82

 

R.I.P NEIL ARMSTRONG..............SAFE JOURNEY

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As a boy, I drew and painted all the APOLLO mission logos - they had different ones for each flight.

It was the greatest event for all mankind in those days, I'm pretty sure. "We" were on the Moon.

 

 

 

A real Challenger has gone to travel the Stars - Salute, Neil Armstrong!

 

 

Edited by Olham

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Massive childhood hero of mine. Not just a great embassador for the USA, but a testament to NASA and their capacity to find people of such great calibre.

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There are very few moments in the World History when anybody on Earth can remember exactly what he/she was doing when hearing the news, as for September 11. For those alive then, the first steps of Man on the Moon is such a moment. For ever.

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And he didn't hog the glory for the USA, he shared it with the world. "One small step for (a) man, one giant leap for MANKIND!"

 

More than head and shoulders above the crowd

 

:salute:.

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And he didn't hog the glory for the USA, he shared it with the world. "One small step for (a) man, one giant leap for MANKIND!"

 

More than head and shoulders above the crowd

 

:salute:.

Undoubtedly, Apollo program was a great effort done by USA. But that small step carried the weight of 10000 years of human civilization.

Neil knew it. That step was bigger than a country, than an empire...

That moment was a victory for whole mankind.

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What I didn't know was his service record with 78 combat missions flown in Korea. Mr Armstrong must have seen some incredible sights....

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Neil, rest in peace and rise in glory.

 

I was 14 when it happened, and I thought how neat it would be to do that. I had the 3 ft tall Saturn V model, the larger scale CSM/LM models, the whole lot. It wasn't until I got much older that I realized what tremendous courage it took to do what these men did. You talk about nerves of steel! So many things that cold go wrong, so far from Earth that radio waves take measurable time to reach you! Just the three of you; then just the two of you, in this spindly little lightweight craft that's hardly bigger than the cubicle I'm siting in! Yow!

 

We need a "21-gun salute" smiley!

 

:salute::cry:

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Yes, it really was something special, something that had never been done in the history of mankind. It took tremendous skill and courage, and not only from the astronauts themselves, though obviously they were the ones who'd have lost their lives if something had gone badly wrong.

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There was a TV ad several years ago now, I forget if it was Audi or BMW, but they boasted having more computer power in their car than NASA had to put men on the moon. These days we just take computers for granted. My Ipod has more memory on it than my first five computers all put together. The backup and assistance these fellas had for getting to the moon in terms of computers was primitive to say the least. Brave men, all of them.

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I read a quote of his from a rare public appearance in 2000: "I am, and will ever be, a white-socks, pocket protector, nerdy engineer, born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace and propelled by compressible flow."

 

I humbly propose that Friday, the day of his funeral, all who desire wear white socks and, if you don't have a pocket protector, at least shove your shirt pocket full of mechanical pencils or pens and a shorty slider rule, machinist's scale, etc.!

 

Here is the full resolution scan of Buzz Aldrin's picture of Neil after he became the first man to walk on the moon. The exhilaration and exhaustion show on his face.

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