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Atreides

Question regarding aircraft data

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So I was poking around data.ini's of various aircraft's and have a quick question what does the data below with regards's to ceiling represent ? Is it the altitude of the a/c that it will reach after ALT+N has been hit or is it the max ceiling of the a/c in meter's ?

 

[MissionData]

NationName=China

ServiceStartYear=2000

ServiceEndYear=2010

AircraftRole=FIGHTER

AircraftCapability=DAY_AND_NIGHT

Availability=VERY_COMMON

PrimaryRoles=CAP,INTERCEPT

SecondaryRoles=ESCORT,SWEEP,CAS,SEAD,ARMED_RECON,RECON,STRIKE,ANTI_SHIP

NormalMissionRadius=800

MaxMissionRadius=1200

Ceiling=19900.0 <--------------- :dntknw:

MinBaseSize=SMALL

Edited by Atreides

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Thanks Streak, but I've noticed that for certain aircraft the value is rather high, I mean for some it's kinda off the chart's, atleast look's like that to an amature like me, is it possible to specify the ceiling in meters or feet ?

 

 

EDIT:- Furthermore, I know, I know I'm digressing, what control's the altitude that an a/c attain's once the jump to next waypoint key has been hit ?

Edited by Atreides

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Ceiling= is the altitude when engines go to zero thrust. This is a simple method of enforcing altitude restriction. When you get near the Ceiling, within maybe 500m, the engine quickly loses thrust.

 

You don't need it. Proper construction of thrust/altitude tables allows one to set Ceiling=1E+9 for example, and you still can lose engine thrust to model published ceiling data.

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The technical definition:

 

The service ceiling attempts to capture the maximum usable altitude of an aircraft. Specifically, it is the density altitude at which flying in a clean configuration, at the best rate of climb airspeed for that altitude and with all engines operating and producing maximum continuous power, will produce a 100 feet per minute climb.

 

In game, it serves as a cap.

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Thanks guy's for all the info. Uuumm, one last question though, with regard's to the "ceiling =" part does it have to be in meters or can it be if feet as well ?

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Thanks guy's for all the info. Uuumm, one last question though, with regard's to the "ceiling =" part does it have to be in meters or can it be if feet as well ?

 

 

Think the game is run in meters :rolleyes:

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Think the game is run in meters :rolleyes:

 

Well, metric at any rate. So, newtons, meters, kilometers, etc. depending on what parameter you are talking about.

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Well, metric at any rate. So, newtons, meters, kilometers, etc. depending on what parameter you are talking about.

 

 

Time to find my unit conversion sheet from earlier this year in Freshmen Physics.

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Just thinking, its possible that on some aircraft/engines that air density effects might "blow up" or something (think vertical asymptope) and the engine suddenly flames out for a given narrow range of air density and airspeed or maybe AOA too. So, for any aircraft like that, a fairly sudden thrust drop like the Ceiling function would be better than having to construct an overly detailed thrust/altitude table. Dunno.

 

I recall reading about experiments using F-106 to go vertical, pullup starting at 45,000ft/Mach2 in attempts to take down U-2 (and B-57 wide wings) with Genies. Afterburner was lost first at some altitude, and later dry thrust too as the aircraft gained altitude. Something like that.

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As far as I know all those altitude records in F4's , F 15's, SU 27's and partly in F 104's were made while the planes were sailing over the top in a carefully calculated balistic traject without any engine power left.

The rocket assisted NASA Starfighter was another matter of course....

You should be able to try it out yourself by accelerating to for example Mach 2 at 36000 ft to 40000 ft, pull up carefully to about 45 degrees and see where it gets you, with your engine at full bore AND with your engine at idle as from for instance 60000 ft

 

Aju,

 

Derk :happy:

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One last question, sorry, but if I don't ask I'll never learn. What entry do I edit so that when I hit the ALT+N and the a/c jumps to the next waypoint it isn't at a a irritating altitude of say 18,000 ft ? :dntknw:

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One last question, sorry, but if I don't ask I'll never learn. What entry do I edit so that when I hit the ALT+N and the a/c jumps to the next waypoint it isn't at a a irritating altitude of say 18,000 ft ? :dntknw:

 

You have to go into the MissionControl.ini and edit the following default mission altitude lines:

 

[Altitude]

Normal=7620

Low=3048

VeryLow=304.80

High=9144

VeryHigh=10972.8

 

These are my personal settings for WOV. The sim seems to pick Normal altitude most often for a mission. As far as I know, you cannot manually edit the mission altitude from the planning map.

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You have to go into the MissionControl.ini and edit the following default mission altitude lines:

 

[Altitude]

Normal=7620

Low=3048

VeryLow=304.80

High=9144

VeryHigh=10972.8

 

These are my personal settings for WOV. The sim seems to pick Normal altitude most often for a mission. As far as I know, you cannot manually edit the mission altitude from the planning map.

 

A while back I was flying the F-111 and was annoyed that my flight wasn't following me down on the deck (they basicaly refused to go any lower then around 1,000 ft).

Changing those values will also fix that problem.

 

[Altitude]

Normal=150

Low=100

VeryLow=50

High=5000

VeryHigh=8000

 

This will make your flight follow you down low.  :good:

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A while back I was flying the F-111 and was annoyed that my flight wasn't following me down on the deck (they basicaly refused to go any lower then around 1,000 ft).

Changing those values will also fix that problem.

 

[Altitude]

Normal=150

Low=100

VeryLow=50

High=5000

VeryHigh=8000

 

This will make your flight follow you down low.  :good:

 

It might also lead to more frequent crashes when you press Alt-N. :wink:

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