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rabu

What WWI fighter is this?

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OK, what plane and model is this and year and gun used and where was it used?

Anything else to add?

 

 

M1.jpg

 

 

M2.jpg

 

 

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Morane-Saulnier Type N

French Air Force

RFC

Russian Air Service

Hotchkiss M1909 machine gun

 

 

 

 

While the Type N was a graceful-looking aircraft and utilised an advanced, aerodynamic design, it was not easy to fly due to its stiff controls (using wing warping instead of ailerons) and high landing speed. The Type N mounted a single unsynchronized forward-firing machine gun (either a .303-in Vickers or 7.9 mm Hotchkiss) which used the deflector wedges, first demonstrated on the Morane-Saulnier Type L, in order to fire through the propeller arc.

 

A large metal spinner designed to streamline the aircraft caused the engines to overheat because the spinner deflected air away from the engine. In 1915, the spinner was removed from the design and no more overheating problems were found. The removal of the spinner caused very little loss in performance.

 

The Type N was not particularly successful. Only 49 aircraft were built and it was quickly rendered obsolete by the pace of aircraft development.

Edited by nbryant

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The plane was easy - Morane Saulnier "N" type.

The gun is a Hotchkiss Model 1914. Not that I knew this - but I have my sources.

Maybe the same as you have.

:grin:

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I read that one of the reasons that the spinner was originally added was to stop bullet deflections from the prop wedges coming back into the engine.

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Morane, yes, N, Yes, I first thought it might be a type I, but looking closser there are definitely wedges on the prop and I believe the I had moved up to a synchronized Lewis or Vickers by then

 

That was fast!

Edited by rabu

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Morane, yes, N, Yes, I first thought it might be a type I, but looking closser there are definitely wedges on the prop and I believe the I had moved up to a synchronized Lewis or Vickers by then

That was fast!

 

I was in the process of typing up a long-winded reply stating why this had to be an N and not a G, H, I, even U, V, or AC. But it took so long I refreshed and saw you'd changed your last post.

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Why not continue this WW1 aircraft quiz? Here comes my round:

 

Which aircraft is this?

 

 

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Why not continue this WW1 aircraft quiz? Here comes my round:

 

Which aircraft is this?

 

 

 

Well, can't see the rudder to be sure, but I think it's the Sopwith Snipe.

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Exactly, OvS - a Sopwith Salamander with an experimental camouflage.

 

Perhaps you want to do the next one?

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Why not continue this WW1 aircraft quiz? Here comes my round:

 

Which aircraft is this?

 

 

 

 

my guess: Sopwith Salamder. I think the tip-off is the unusual paint-scheme. the British were very parochial about that sort of thing. and the only aircraft I've seen painted like that is the "Salamander" which was supposed to be used for ground-attack missions. to my knowledge it never saw service in the war, as it arrived too late.

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Waldemar, it is a Salamander - but I had posted that already; sorry.

 

Carrick, this should be a Nieuport 11 Bebe?

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.

 

And more than that Olham, it is the Nieuport 11 Bebe of Lt. Armand de Turenne of Escadrille N48, circa mid-1916

 

Cheers!

 

Lou

 

.

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my guess: Sopwith Salamder. I think the tip-off is the unusual paint-scheme. the British were very parochial about that sort of thing. and the only aircraft I've seen painted like that is the "Salamander" which was supposed to be used for ground-attack missions. to my knowledge it never saw service in the war, as it arrived too late.

 

According to Kenneth Munson, in Aircraft of World War I, "it is doubtful if these saw combat service." Still, I'd love to have one in the game, specially with 2000 rounds per gun. :wink:

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OK, here's one that might stump some people, although a major part of the answer is visible in the pic :).

 

WTF is this? When I was a toddler, I vaguely remember having a pull-toy airplane that looked much like this. It had bigger wheels made of red plastic with a bent axle so it wobbled when I pulled it along by the yellow plastic tube that served as a string. The axle also had a crank on it that worked like a cam on a wooden disk that had some sticky coating on it. When this got turned, it made a squeaking sound.

 

But, this was a real airplane. Any guesses?

post-45917-036483200 1280184019.jpg

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OK, here's one that might stump some people, although a major part of the answer is visible in the pic :).

 

WTF is this? When I was a toddler, I vaguely remember having a pull-toy airplane that looked much like this. It had bigger wheels made of red plastic with a bent axle so it wobbled when I pulled it along by the yellow plastic tube that served as a string. The axle also had a crank on it that worked like a cam on a wooden disk that had some sticky coating on it. When this got turned, it made a squeaking sound.

 

But, this was a real airplane. Any guesses?

 

I'm going to take a wild stab and say Albatros D.XI.

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.

 

Don't think that's it BigAl, as the D.XI did not have the cowl behind the cockpit. Also the cabane struts are different.

 

I'm not sure on this one myself. It has a certain Rumpler quality about it though.

.

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