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Olham

Leutnant von Richthofen's first claim

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I've seen the English translations of his claims before, but always in plain text. The one you have linked to would appear to be a contemporary copy made shortly after the War for the Imperial War Museum in London. Neat!

 

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It says he fired at closest range. 10 meters. Is that slightly less than 30 feet? Wow, I never realized they would dare get that close in real life, but I guess a lot depends on closing speed to the target too. The faster you are catching up to them the more dangerous it gets in that you might not have enough time to turn away.

 

Hellshade

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There was this memorable mission by Albert Deullin in 1916, when he came behind a Eindecker at closer range than 30 ft, and placed about 25 rounds in the cockpit of the unfortunate German pilot. Deullin wrote with delight: “The fellow was so riddled that vaporized blood sprayed on my hood, windshield, cap, and goggles. Naturally, the descent from 2,600 meters was delicious to contemplate.”

Try that with a Phoenix !!

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Good thing he didn't use any semi colons! :)

Semicolon the claim killer, indeed! :rofl:

 

 

Sounds very brutal, Capitaine Vengeur - there was so much aggression between our two nations,

which I am very glad has now ended.

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Somebody must have informed MvR early in his career that he should never use semi-colons. He did a good job at following the advice. :grin:

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These translations are all available at the National Archives in London. Copies of the originals. Mine look exactly like that.

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Sounds very brutal, Capitaine Vengeur - there was so much aggression between our two nations,

which I am very glad has now ended.

Actually, Deullin at that time had just lost a close friend (S-Lt Jean Peretti, Esc. N3), which explains his brutal thirst for revenge. Meanwhile, during WW1, aggressiveness and calls to murder seem to have come mostly from France towards Germany, not the reverse way. The German press only showed some quiet contempt and distant superiority (too unquestionable to be talked about). Same thing towards Russia. It seems that the Germans kept all of their anger and verbal aggressiveness towards evil England and the arrogant British Empire ruling the waves.

 

I've even read that as the French papers multiplied the made-up or over-exagerated examples of German cruelty, deceit and cowardice, the German papers sometimes paid tribute to examples of French bravery as models for their youth (die-hard stand of Fort de Vaux at Verdun, for instance). Probably with the idea that if such an unquestionably frivolous, vain and decadent nation could produce such feats, which summits couldn't reach the German youth?

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It seems that the Germans kept all of their anger and verbal aggressiveness towards evil England and the arrogant British Empire ruling the waves.

Well, Prince Lichnowsky (ambassador in London) and many other Germans wanted a friendship

with England, but of course they were competitors at sea and about colonies.

 

Probably with the idea that if such an unquestionably frivolous, vain and decadent nation could produce such feats, which summits couldn't reach the German youth?

They did indeed regard the French as decadent and frivolous - with all the envy behind that. :grin:

We have a saying in Germany when someone is living really well, like perhaps in holidays,

with good food and wine and sunshine and girls, then we say:

 

He is living like god in France! :cool:

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