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Dave

Shooting Skeet

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What gauge shotgun is most common for shooting skeet. 

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Depends. For someone with a smaller frame and lighter build, a .410 is better. 20-gauge and 12-gauge are the most common, from what I've seen

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So using a 12 gauge is waiting ammo etc I take it. 

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My 870 12 gauge is what I use at the local range.

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The size of the shot pattern is reduced as you go down in bore size.  12 gauge is probably the most widely used, followed by 20 gauge.  28 gauge is regaining some of its popularity, but ammo is much more expensive.  A box of 20 gauge shot shells will probably cost you more then a box of 12 gauge shells since 12 gauge is the most commonly used shotgun ammunition.  28 gauge ammo is even more expensive then 20 gauge, and .410 is also surprisingly costly.  You will break more birds with a 12 gauge, and that is really the whole point of the game.  The recoil on any shotgun is substantially reduced with a semi-auto action, since the functioning of the action actually absorbs a substantial portion of the recoil.  Any fixed breech shotgun will have more felt recoil than a semi in the same gauge.  Fixed breech would include pump action, over and under, and side by side actions. 

If you are shooting at a real life skeet range, the real trick is knowing the leads for each station.  A friend of mine that competed in the trials for a spot on the U.S Olympic team taught me these.  I promise these leads will make you appear to really know what you are doing!  For the station at the left tower, hold 1 foot in front of the bird on the way out, and 2 feet in front for the incoming bird.  The lead on the station at the right tower is hold on the bird going out, and 1.5 feet in front of the incoming bird.  The station in the middle between the two towers is the easiest; just cover the bird with the barrel and shoot.  The leads for the stations on the left and right of the semi-circle are the same at each respective station as you move toward the back middle station.  The leads for the first station in from the trap house are a 2 foot lead going out, and 3 feet in front of the incoming bird.  The leads for the second station in from the trap house are 3.5 feet going out, and 3.5 feet incoming.  The lead for the center back station is 4 feet going out, and 4 feet incoming.  I drew these out on an index card, and keep the index card in shooting vest pocket in case I need to review them. 

 

I live close to the Whittier Narrows Skeet and Trap Range, and used to shoot skeet and trap pretty regularly.  It's a really challenging and entertaining sport, but the cost of ammunition can get pretty costly if you shoot often.  Reloading can really reduce the ammunition cost, which makes it even more enjoyable!  Save your empty shotshells in case you decide to get a reloader in the future.  I've got trashbags full of them out in the garage.

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I saw a female S-1 CPT almost blow my BN CDR's head off shooting skeet once!

Oh you have to tell that story. I got to know what happened. 

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I also use my Rem 70 12 Gauge for shooting clays. I will use 8 shot and save my good 2-3 shot for the actual birds. Have fun!

 

.410s in the US have become very difficult to find ammo for and if you do, you'll pay for it handsomely. A 410 was my first shotgun years ago. I'd like to buy a 20 gauge for my daughter to learn on.

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My Son shoots a fair bit, 12 Gauge

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by UK_Widowmaker

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I was thinking 12 gauge might of been over kill. So that settles that then. Thanks fellas. 

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yea, 12 gauge.  It's the best unless you are of a smaller frame. 

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BTW, don't limit yourself to airborne skeet. It's perfectly reasonable to blast it when it's on the ground, too. Only when all are finally eliminated will we be free of their tyranny!!

 

Grenades in skeet nests are very effective.

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You could always nuke skeet factories and their associated POL facilities

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