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ShrikeHawk

China's New CIWS

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I'm wondering how much of this should be believed. The US CIWS fires 4,500 rounds per minute, so naturally the Chinese CIWS fires 10,000 rounds per minute. Our weapon is a 20mm, theirs is 30mm. It seems like China is saying, "oh yeah, well...well...Ours goes up to eleven!" As though they looked at our specs and decided, whether in reality or not, their weapon would do everything one better. Can anyone confirm or deny the Chinese specs in the link below?

http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?id=20141211000100&cid=1101

Edited by ShrikeHawk

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(shrugs)

possible. somewhat similar to the Russian equivelant, also a 30mm. more barrels and higher rate of fire to deal with the faster cruise missiles today sounds logical. One of the limitations of our current 20mm is that the range isn't enough to engage a supersonic cruise missile and stop it before the remnants hit the ship. So the USN has been looking at upgrading ours but has gone the missile route instead for now.

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Only a few things wrong with that story; facts, images, and sources. Beyond that believe what you want. IMHO

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The old soviet GSh-6-23M 23mm "gatling"  can also fire around 10K per minute, and it was already done 40 years ago.  Gas operated, no need of spinning motor and electricity with almost no "spin-up" time.  AK-630 30mm  was developed in the mid 60's, equipping warships by the late 60's. The AK-630-2  Duet mount has 2x GSh-6-30 guns of 5400 rpm,  thats bit more of 10K all together, and no new development. So does the Kortik (Kashtan M) it also includes missiles.

I see no reason behind this monstrous development and overcomplicated (and huge) stuff. If true at all.

Edited by Snailman

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I long for a nuclear powered battleship with Railguns and uberpowerful laser CIWS...but after Obama put down the petition to build the Death Star...

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I long for a nuclear powered battleship with Railguns and uberpowerful laser CIWS...but after Obama put down the petition to build the Death Star...

 

He does not believe in technological terror to be created )) He trusts in the dark side of the Force )))

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I'm wondering how much of this should be believed. The US CIWS fires 4,500 rounds per minute, so naturally the Chinese CIWS fires 10,000 rounds per minute. Our weapon is a 20mm, theirs is 30mm. It seems like China is saying, "oh yeah, well...well...Ours goes up to eleven!" As though they looked at our specs and decided, whether in reality or not, their weapon would do everything one better. Can anyone confirm or deny the Chinese specs in the link below?

http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?id=20141211000100&cid=1101

 

Metal Storm had a 40mm weapon system based on their 20mm CIWS that topped out at around 250k/minute. Australian designers win this pissing contest!! :tongue:

Edited by SayWhatt

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I long for a nuclear powered battleship with Railguns and uberpowerful laser CIWS...but after Obama put down the petition to build the Death Star...

Oh yeah! I'd like to see China's CIWS shoot down a round flying in at Mach 10.

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The old soviet GSh-6-23M 23mm "gatling"  can also fire around 10K per minute, and it was already done 40 years ago.  Gas operated, no need of spinning motor and electricity with almost no "spin-up" time.  AK-630 30mm  was developed in the mid 60's, equipping warships by the late 60's. The AK-630-2  Duet mount has 2x GSh-6-30 guns of 5400 rpm,  thats bit more of 10K all together, and no new development. So does the Kortik (Kashtan M) it also includes missiles.

I see no reason behind this monstrous development and overcomplicated (and huge) stuff. If true at all.

 

That is the system that I was referring to above.  Thanks!!

 

yep, already out there in considerable numbers. 

Edited by Typhoid

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  10,000 rounds per minute is one thing; tracking and hitting a hyper-sonic target is another kettle of fish. The Chinese have been popping things out of the oven pretty regularly to counter Western forces, lately. Eurofighter? We've got one of those. (J-10, I think.) F-22? We got that, too. (J-11 ?) Short-field, C-17 knock-off? Check this out, and on, and on. I'm not saying we should discount their claims completely, but take them with a large grain of salt. They're buying Su-35s so they can reverse-engineer the latest Russian engines, for chrissakes. I can't wait to see the RCS of that new J-11, for instance ( preferably lit-up by a US F-15 or F-22). There's more to stealth than making a plane that looks like ours. Just my $.02.

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While China's stealth abilities are unknown and unproven, the rest of their stuff is basically 4th gen with the notable exception of the engines. They've struggled for decades to get a modern jet engine in production.

 

India has had issues as well, their engines producing less thrust than they wanted (and needed) so they need to import them for high-power needs.

 

Brazil, Russia, and the rest of the West has been designing and building them far longer and that shows. Granted Russian engines have had reliability and maintainability issues, but when they're working they work great.

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