Jump to content

Recommended Posts

After doing long research and reading up on the flight documentation of the F-8 Crusader, I have found that there is support for chaff and flares on the aircraft though in game, only 60 chaff is available unless editing the data file. I went and gave the F-8's 30 chaff and flares as the manual says in real life as far as the mod 3 F-8E to F-8J and H around 1966 to the latest. I would hope eventually someone can update the countermeasure options in a later update to the F-8 on one of the third party mods like the mirage pack, french F-8 and such. Just saying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote

unless editing the data file

that's kinda how its done. don't expect anything from 3W. it's all on us

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think when it comes to Vietnam, the all-Chaff loadout makes sense. While i edited both AIM-9B and R-3Ss to be 180º rear aspect, it seems SAMs are still much more of a concern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MiG encounters were relatively rare. The Vietnamese didn't have many and on most days used them very sparingly. The Navy mainly faced MiG-17s which had no IRMs. SA-2s were fired on a daily basis. The Navy needed chaff far more than they needed flares. So, you shouldn't be looking for what the aircraft was capable of carrying, but instead looking for documentation of what they actually carried.

For example, the F-4 could in theory carry 4 x AIM-9 and 4 x AIM-7. But the USAF and USN used different loadouts based on their own experience and judgement. The USAF had crappy AIM-9s and favored carrying AIM-7s, but the USAF also liked to put an ecm pod in one of the forward AIM-7 wells. The USAF also liked to carry the AIM-4D instead of the AIM-9. So even on May 10, 1972, during the biggest day of air-to-air combat during the entire war, Major Lodge's Oyster flight of F-4Ds was carrying 1 x AIM-4D on each wing pylon, either 2 or 3 AIM-7 + ECM pod. The USN had great AIM-9s and almost always carried 4xAIM-9. But since the F-4 couldn't fire the forward AIM-7s without dropping the centerline tank and the Navy had horrible results with the AIM-7, they usually only carried 2xAIM-7 in the rear wells. Unlike the USAF, Navy F-4s could carry 2xAIM-9 and bombs under each wing plyon, so it was quite common for USN CAP/Escort F-4s to carry some bombs as well as missiles to provide some SEAD for the attack aircraft. Whereas in the game, carrying 4xAIM-9 and 4xAIM-7 is typical and generally the most effective loadout.

Edited by streakeagle
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, streakeagle said:

The USAF also liked to carry the AIM-4D instead of the AIM-9. So even on May 10, 1972, during the biggest day of air-to-air combat during the entire war, Major Lodge's Oyster flight of F-4Ds was carrying 1 x AIM-4D on each wing pylon, either 2 or 3 AIM-7 + ECM pod.

I didn't know AIM-4s were carried that late, that would be certainly a bump in difficulty ingame when AIM-9Js become available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Historically, USAF AIM-9Es and AIM-9Js performed the same or worse than AIM-9Bs, while the USN very hastily deployed AIM-9Ds with excellent results (around 40-60%) and the AIM-9G and AIM-9H had results comparable to the AIM-9L (around 80%). Late AIM-9Js as deployed on F-15s supposedly solved the early AIM-9J problems, but the AIM-9L, derived from the AIM-9G/H series was far superior, so the USAF finally gave up and switched to the USN derived variants that were comparable in range and speed, more maneuverable, all-aspect, and more reliable. The AIM-4D had dismal performance in Vietnam, worse than the AIM-9B. But the USAF really insisted on using them rather than the USN developed AIM-9. Politics and pride don't mix well with making good decisions that effect combat effectiveness.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be able to dig up some F-8 operational info. I don't know if my sources go into that level of detail.

But here is where I discussed Oyster flight's 1972 May loadouts with 2xAIM-4D and an ecm pod in the forward AIM-7 well. Note: there is also an ecm pod under one of the AIM-4Ds.

Oyster Flight Loadout on May 10, 1972 - The Pub - CombatACE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One would have thought since they already had "borrowed" the Phantom from the Navy, the Air Force brass or whoever made the call shouldn't have been so concerned about using the same model of Sidewinder and just fund the same program.

I think Maj. Bruce Gordon, former F-102/106/100 pilot and senior Youtuber, commented that AIM-4s themselves were great, but weren't properly integrated in Phantoms. I don't know what to make of it, for what I'm concerned, if the USN already had something that worked well why bother trying in the middle of a war.

I think an F-102 managed to shoot several AIM-4s without against MiG-21s that had just bounced his wingman, but from what i read they had to be already far and getting away, and of course it seems too little of a sample to find out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Project Shoehorn was the US Navy program to retrofit its Vietnam aircraft with RWR/ECM including the ALE series chaff/flare dispensers. The F-8 received the ALE-29 series with a pair of 15-round boxes. It was designed for dropping chaff and you can see that in the control panel switch functions. But per the F-8 manual, it could carry flares, too. But there was no way to choose flare or chaff, just the ability to select one or both pods and determine how many and how fast to deploy countermeasures. So, if flares were available and loaded, it would have been possible to load one with flares and one with chaff, then use the selector to drop the one you wanted or both. The focus was on defeating SA-2s, but later in the war, shoulder fired SA-7s became a threat, so it is possible that flares may have been carried.

AIM-4 limititations:

You have to turn on cooling in anticipation of combat, which takes a while.

Once you turn on cooling, it has a time limit and runs out of cooling.

You have to hold the firing solution for several seconds before the missile launches.

Small warhead with no proximity fuse: the missile must score a direct kinetic hit and even then may not do significant damage.

It was not a dogfight weapon at all (like the early AIM-7 and AIM-9B). Against maneuvering MiGs, you could never meet all of the firing constraints, and even if you did, it probably missed. The USAF insisted on switching to the AIM-4 and consequently saw its ability to score kills against VPAF MiGs dramatically reduced until they switched back to AIM-9s. The AIM-9B was far easier to use and far more reliable even though it also had similar launch g and minimum range limits. The AIM-9D was available almost immediately at the start of the Vietnam War and was far superior to the AIM-9B and AIM-4D as reflected by all the kills the Navy scored with it. Robin Olds immediately recognized the mistake of switching to the AIM-4 and ordered his mechanics to create an adapter to permit using the AIM-9B. The USAF leadership (dominated by the Curtis LeMay nuclear war/strategic bomber crowd) was horrible for the duration of the war constantly making bad strategic and tactical decisions that cost many planes and pilots. It was only after the war that the USAF admitted its training and tactics were horrible and that the Navy's AIM-9 was the future instead of continuing development of its AIM-9E/J series. The AIM-4 went away with the Century series interceptors, with the AIM-54 being the only derivative to remain in service in any capacity with US forces. The Iranians praised the AIM-54 can claimed many kills. In US Navy service, it had a history of poor reliability during test and training shots and the few times it was fired in combat, it failed.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, macelena said:

One would have thought since they already had "borrowed" the Phantom from the Navy, the Air Force brass or whoever made the call shouldn't have been so concerned about using the same model of Sidewinder and just fund the same program.

I think Maj. Bruce Gordon, former F-102/106/100 pilot and senior Youtuber, commented that AIM-4s themselves were great, but weren't properly integrated in Phantoms. I don't know what to make of it, for what I'm concerned, if the USN already had something that worked well why bother trying in the middle of a war.

I think an F-102 managed to shoot several AIM-4s without against MiG-21s that had just bounced his wingman, but from what i read they had to be already far and getting away, and of course it seems too little of a sample to find out.

Politics and pettiness have always been part of aircraft and weapon procurement and that wont change....the guys in the field can make the recommendations but if those who hold the budget have other ideas then...........

The F-4 setup of AIM-4 was clearly unusable in most typical SEA engagements however F-102A was still set up as a pure interceptor so even they needed to get the missile ready before use. In the one engagement (Feb 68) the guy that did not get shot down apparently fired 3 x AIM-4Ds and all missed.............sounds like it was the start of the engagement and before his wingman was hit......but anyway.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, MigBuster said:

The F-4 setup of AIM-4 was clearly unusable in most typical SEA engagements however F-102A was still set up as a pure interceptor so even they needed to get the missile ready before use. In the one engagement (Feb 68) the guy that did not get shot down apparently fired 3 x AIM-4Ds and all missed.............sounds like it was the start of the engagement and before his wingman was hit......but anyway.

 

 

I thought he shot after the other F-102 exploded, while the MiGs were pulling out. If it was the way you say, it would be even more of a failure.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn it ! The F-8 Crusader  “The Last of the Gunfighters” one of the most beautiful Warbirds in American Aviation History. :ok: The F-8 Crusader Once Scared a Vietnamese MiG Pilot Into Ejecting Before a Dogfight. :pilotfly:The image shows: RF-8G Crusader of VFP-63 is launched from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), in 1973. The RF-8G is the reconnaissance version of the famous F-8 “Crusader,” the last U.S. Navy jet fighter who’s primary armament consisted of cannons rather than missiles. With its powerful afterburning J-57 engine, the F-8 is the first supersonic Navy fighter. On July 16, 1957, then Major John Glenn, USMC, who later became the first man to orbit the Earth, completed the first supersonic transcontinental flight averaging 732.5 mph flying an earlier model, the RF-8A. During the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1963, the RF-8A, provided vital photographs regarding Soviet missile emplacements. The aircraft on display is 1 of 73 RF-8G models upgraded in 1965

RF-8G_Crusader_of_VFP-63_is_launched_from_USS_Coral_Sea_(CVA-43),_in_1973.jpg

Edited by Flamesky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it was hard, but at least I never got tracked with so much ECM power

Loadout.png.38e5e85bf064e731d07102845a6cf41c.pngDebriefing.thumb.png.ac6a7d431dc25330b19ecd63152c5160.png

 

Edited by macelena
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, macelena said:

I thought he shot after the other F-102 exploded, while the MiGs were pulling out. If it was the way you say, it would be even more of a failure.  

Info is from F-102 Delta Dagger Units (p75 Osprey 2020)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, MigBuster said:

Info is from F-102 Delta Dagger Units (p75 Osprey 2020)

I need to get a haul of those, just went to self-isolation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite frankly, during Vietnam, the later F-8E, J and H, while capable of having flares simply did not need them during the early part of the war due to radar guided sams. However, later on the war and after, eventually they will need them as air threats along with ground based ones evolve will have better aam and sams. The Soviet R-60 while agile and lethal loves to eat flares if done properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny. The R-60 was not used in Vietnam War. They had only R-3S, which was a perfect AIM-9B copy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/11/2021 at 9:27 PM, macelena said:

I think Maj. Bruce Gordon, former F-102/106/100 pilot and senior Youtuber, commented that AIM-4s themselves were great, but weren't properly integrated in Phantoms. I don't know what to make of it, for what I'm concerned, if the USN already had something that worked well why bother trying in the middle of a war.

This one illustrates a supersonic intercept with an AIM-4.

This is the one withe the comment on the F-4 and the AIM-4 missile.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nice 106 painting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Wrench said:

nice 106 painting

It sure helps that the 106 is so nice to begin with. I mean, it would be criminal to botch a portrait of Scarlett Johansson. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2021 at 11:51 AM, Gepard said:

Funny. The R-60 was not used in Vietnam War. They had only R-3S, which was a perfect AIM-9B copy.

The thing that I was thinking of is flying the F-8 after the Vietnam era and trying my skill with my Crusader on more modern jets. Some of the times I succeed and the latter not so much. Pretty much a double negative situation which requires wits and skills to outfight anyone and anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By dtmdragon


      View File Third Wire F-8 Crusader Upgrade & Enhancement
      This has been a labor of love for my all-time favorite fighter aircraft. The service period of this aircraft fits perfectly with the time period that the Strike Fighters 2 game engine gives its best: Gun armed jet fighters with short range missiles and early/ limited avionics.

      Changes:
      -    The ‘SF2V Air & Ground War Expansion v.2.0 Gold’ and ‘F-8 DATA & LOADOUT v1.0 update’ here at CA were used as a starting point for this project.
      -    Maximum G has been changed to 6.3 which is the airframe structural limit in all NATOPS publications.
      -    There are automatically operating ‘fake’ leading edge droops (slats) that simulates the pilot being able to lower them a few degrees with a button on the throttle for cruising flight and manoeuvring flight (aka dog fighting). By ‘fake’ I mean they are not player operated in SF2 or linked to the 3D model but the aerodynamic effect is realistically simulated. You will notice the droop indicator in the cockpit will change with them however. If they were manually controlled in the game the AI would not use them correctly.
      -    Single AIM-9 missiles and rails can be loaded instead of the Y-racks on all F-8 variants. This is done at the loadout screen (and by the loadout.ini file) it is set up so you cannot load single missiles/ rails and double missiles/ Y-racks at the same time.
      -    Cannons harmonized as per NATOPS manual and gun accuracy adjusted to real world levels.
      -    Adjustment to most decal positions and inclusion of Squadron codes on the wings.
      -    Additional details added to most stock skins.
      -    Additional squadron specific higher resolution skins with more accurate markings for that particular squadron.
      -    Included for F-8J (69) is a proposed SEA camo overpaint for the VF-211 aircraft on detachment at Udorn in early 1972 to school USAF pilots in Dogfighting. The repaint was initially agreed to but it would have added 1200lbs so it was abandoned. If you wish to use it and fly DACT against USAF Phantoms you can load the extra 1200lb at the load out screen via a unique station specific hard point.
      -    Overhaul of each data.ini and avionics.ini to bring them in line with the information in the F-8 NATOPS manuals, NATOPS supplements and F-8 Tactics manual.
      -    More detailed pilots and ejection seats.
      -    Fully compatible with ‘SF2V Air & Ground War Expansion v.2.0 Gold’ or Third Wire SF2V campaigns. 
      -    Additional year specific aircraft to better reflect physical and avionic changes. As well as correcting a few mistakes and omissions by Third Wire.
      -    Below is the list of aircraft and a few of the specific major changes you may notice in addition to the list above:

      F-8C 
      -    Missing radar symbology added and radar performance/ parameters corrected. The radar cursor for selecting a target is a long horizontal line that moves up from the bottom of the scope and is only adjustable in range and not azimuth to select a specific radar contact.
      F-8C (66)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    This is the TW F-8D model modified into a F-8C in order for it to have the Y-rack Fuselage weapon rails.
      F-8D
      -    Missing radar symbology added including steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range.
      F-8D (66)
      -    Same as above.
      F-8E
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See screenshot for more information.
      -    Missing radar symbology added including range rate circle, which also doubles as the steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range.
      -    Missile firing order and cockpit weapon station section dial corrected.
      F-8E (66)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    Significant use of the AIM-9C as after a lot of research it turns out they were commonly carried over Vietnam in this period, notably by VF-211.
      F-8E(FN)
      -    Equipped with the nose mounted IRST system like the USN F-8D and E.
      -    This is the TW F-8J model modified into a F-8E(FN) as are all the below French Crusaders so the DLC is NOT required.
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See screenshot for more information.
      -    Location of Matra R.530 missile rails corrected.
      F-8E(FN) (70)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    The nose mounted IRST system is removed from all French aircraft.
      F-8P(FN)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    17 F-8E(FN) are upgraded to extend their service life, included is the Sherloc RWR system.
      F-8P(FN) (94)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    F-8P(FN) are fitted with a GPS navigation system and antenna.
      F-8H
      -    Retains the AN/APQ-83 radar from the F-8D but uses the physically larger and higher resolution cockpit radar display from the F-8E.
      -    Missing radar symbology added including steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range.
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See attached for more information. 
      -    Retains ALQ-51 ECM from the F-8D.
      -    Missile firing order and cockpit weapon station section dial corrected.
      F-8H (69)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    Improved AN/APQ-149 radar fitted in place of the AN/APQ-83.
      -    Additional missing radar symbology added including separate larger range rate circle and separate smaller steering circle. 
      -    A lot of fleet F-8H around this period have had their Nose IRST system (temporarily?) removed.
      F-8H (74)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    After the Vietnam war F-8H has the improved ALQ-100 ECM in a larger pod installed, and full cannon ammo capacity restored.
      F-8J
      -    Improved AN/APQ-124 radar installed.
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See screenshot for more information.
      -    Missing radar symbology added including separate larger range rate circle, separate smaller steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range. 
      -    Missile firing order and cockpit weapon station section dial corrected.
      F-8J (69)
      -    Same as above.
      F-8J (75)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    In 1975 the remaining fleet F-8J (along with the RF-8G) receive the ALQ-126 ECM and ALR-45/50 RHAW RWR. The nose mounted IRST system is permanently removed.
      F-8J (75) [w RWR]
      -    Same as above except:
      -    The cockpit radar display functions as a Vector RWR and not a radar. This is because in real life the pilot could change the radar scope from displaying radar images or displaying the RWR images. The F-8J did not have a separate RWR display. There was a setting in which it would be displaying radar images but if a missile launch was detected the threat bearing line would be displayed flashing over top of the radar images. Not possible in SF2 unfortunately.

      To install:
      1, Unpack and drop into your main mods folder.
      2, Override when prompted.

      Credits:
      -    ‘F-8 DATA & LOADOUT v1.0 update’ by FANATIC MODDER.
      -    ‘SF2V Air & Ground War Expansion v.2.0 Gold’ by Eburger68 and team.
      -    ‘F-8E(FN) Crouze & F-8P(FN) Crouze Prolongé 1.1’ by Paulopanz, Denis Oliveira & Coupi.
      -    Weapons by Ravenclaw_007.
      -    Template by Geary.
      -    Blade.
      -    Wrench.

      CombatAce fair use agreement applies.

      Enjoy,
      Dan.
      Submitter dtmdragon Submitted 12/15/2020 Category F-8  
    • By dtmdragon
      This has been a labor of love for my all-time favorite fighter aircraft. The service period of this aircraft fits perfectly with the time period that the Strike Fighters 2 game engine gives its best: Gun armed jet fighters with short range missiles and early/ limited avionics.

      Changes:
      -    The ‘SF2V Air & Ground War Expansion v.2.0 Gold’ and ‘F-8 DATA & LOADOUT v1.0 update’ here at CA were used as a starting point for this project.
      -    Maximum G has been changed to 6.3 which is the airframe structural limit in all NATOPS publications.
      -    There are automatically operating ‘fake’ leading edge droops (slats) that simulates the pilot being able to lower them a few degrees with a button on the throttle for cruising flight and manoeuvring flight (aka dog fighting). By ‘fake’ I mean they are not player operated in SF2 or linked to the 3D model but the aerodynamic effect is realistically simulated. You will notice the droop indicator in the cockpit will change with them however. If they were manually controlled in the game the AI would not use them correctly.
      -    Single AIM-9 missiles and rails can be loaded instead of the Y-racks on all F-8 variants. This is done at the loadout screen (and by the loadout.ini file) it is set up so you cannot load single missiles/ rails and double missiles/ Y-racks at the same time.
      -    Cannons harmonized as per NATOPS manual and gun accuracy adjusted to real world levels.
      -    Adjustment to most decal positions and inclusion of Squadron codes on the wings.
      -    Additional details added to most stock skins.
      -    Additional squadron specific higher resolution skins with more accurate markings for that particular squadron.
      -    Included for F-8J (69) is a proposed SEA camo overpaint for the VF-211 aircraft on detachment at Udorn in early 1972 to school USAF pilots in Dogfighting. The repaint was initially agreed to but it would have added 1200lbs so it was abandoned. If you wish to use it and fly DACT against USAF Phantoms you can load the extra 1200lb at the load out screen via a unique station specific hard point.
      -    Overhaul of each data.ini and avionics.ini to bring them in line with the information in the F-8 NATOPS manuals, NATOPS supplements and F-8 Tactics manual.
      -    More detailed pilots and ejection seats.
      -    Fully compatible with ‘SF2V Air & Ground War Expansion v.2.0 Gold’ or Third Wire SF2V campaigns. 
      -    Additional year specific aircraft to better reflect physical and avionic changes. As well as correcting a few mistakes and omissions by Third Wire.
      -    Below is the list of aircraft and a few of the specific major changes you may notice in addition to the list above:

      F-8C 
      -    Missing radar symbology added and radar performance/ parameters corrected. The radar cursor for selecting a target is a long horizontal line that moves up from the bottom of the scope and is only adjustable in range and not azimuth to select a specific radar contact.
      F-8C (66)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    This is the TW F-8D model modified into a F-8C in order for it to have the Y-rack Fuselage weapon rails.
      F-8D
      -    Missing radar symbology added including steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range.
      F-8D (66)
      -    Same as above.
      F-8E
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See screenshot for more information.
      -    Missing radar symbology added including range rate circle, which also doubles as the steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range.
      -    Missile firing order and cockpit weapon station section dial corrected.
      F-8E (66)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    Significant use of the AIM-9C as after a lot of research it turns out they were commonly carried over Vietnam in this period, notably by VF-211.
      F-8E(FN)
      -    Equipped with the nose mounted IRST system like the USN F-8D and E.
      -    This is the TW F-8J model modified into a F-8E(FN) as are all the below French Crusaders so the DLC is NOT required.
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See screenshot for more information.
      -    Location of Matra R.530 missile rails corrected.
      F-8E(FN) (70)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    The nose mounted IRST system is removed from all French aircraft.
      F-8P(FN)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    17 F-8E(FN) are upgraded to extend their service life, included is the Sherloc RWR system.
      F-8P(FN) (94)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    F-8P(FN) are fitted with a GPS navigation system and antenna.
      F-8H
      -    Retains the AN/APQ-83 radar from the F-8D but uses the physically larger and higher resolution cockpit radar display from the F-8E.
      -    Missing radar symbology added including steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range.
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See attached for more information. 
      -    Retains ALQ-51 ECM from the F-8D.
      -    Missile firing order and cockpit weapon station section dial corrected.
      F-8H (69)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    Improved AN/APQ-149 radar fitted in place of the AN/APQ-83.
      -    Additional missing radar symbology added including separate larger range rate circle and separate smaller steering circle. 
      -    A lot of fleet F-8H around this period have had their Nose IRST system (temporarily?) removed.
      F-8H (74)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    After the Vietnam war F-8H has the improved ALQ-100 ECM in a larger pod installed, and full cannon ammo capacity restored.
      F-8J
      -    Improved AN/APQ-124 radar installed.
      -    Radar frame lock, range and shoot cue lights all completely changed and now function correctly. See screenshot for more information.
      -    Missing radar symbology added including separate larger range rate circle, separate smaller steering circle, aiming dot, break X and missile max range. 
      -    Missile firing order and cockpit weapon station section dial corrected.
      F-8J (69)
      -    Same as above.
      F-8J (75)
      -    Same as above plus:
      -    In 1975 the remaining fleet F-8J (along with the RF-8G) receive the ALQ-126 ECM and ALR-45/50 RHAW RWR. The nose mounted IRST system is permanently removed.
      F-8J (75) [w RWR]
      -    Same as above except:
      -    The cockpit radar display functions as a Vector RWR and not a radar. This is because in real life the pilot could change the radar scope from displaying radar images or displaying the RWR images. The F-8J did not have a separate RWR display. There was a setting in which it would be displaying radar images but if a missile launch was detected the threat bearing line would be displayed flashing over top of the radar images. Not possible in SF2 unfortunately.

      To install:
      1, Unpack and drop into your main mods folder.
      2, Override when prompted.

      Credits:
      -    ‘F-8 DATA & LOADOUT v1.0 update’ by FANATIC MODDER.
      -    ‘SF2V Air & Ground War Expansion v.2.0 Gold’ by Eburger68 and team.
      -    ‘F-8E(FN) Crouze & F-8P(FN) Crouze Prolongé 1.1’ by Paulopanz, Denis Oliveira & Coupi.
      -    Weapons by Ravenclaw_007.
      -    Template by Geary.
      -    Blade.
      -    Wrench.

      CombatAce fair use agreement applies.

      Enjoy,
      Dan.
    • By ragnarokryan
      For those who love the Phantom and Crusader.
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy, and We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..