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Mike Dora

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About Mike Dora

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    Mike Dora

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    New York (transplanted Scot)

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  1. “In-game wise, it's not as destructive as it could be. Pretty to look at, but you're better off with fragmentation bombs or standard HE (my opinion only)” Wrench, You remind me of when a school friend applied to join the RAF back in 1972 (same year I joined). At the Officer and Aircrew Selection Centre, then at RAF Biggin Hill, they asked him “would you drop napalm on an undefended village?” He replied “oh no. A fragmentation bomb is _far_ more effective.” He didn’t get in.
  2. Fighter Squadron 1948(Jugs galore)

    Like especially the taxiing scene, with a whole lot of P-47s weaving from side to side to see where they’re going. Also love the cockpit closeups with their Hollywood supersized canopies!
  3. 617: Last Days of the Vulcan Sqn

    Inspired by GunnySonics’ find of the 1978 Buccaneer video, I found this impressive documentary of 617’s last days as a Vulcan sqn: All of the attitudes, professionalism, behaviour (!) ring true, the RAF as I remember it. Of course as most here probably know, ironically the Vulcan went into action for the first time just a few months after this documentary was filmed. By then the ac used for 617’s last sortie, was sitting just across the fence from my office at RAF Hendon, in the RAFM car park. In 26 pieces..
  4. RAF Buccaneer 12 Squadron Training Film NATO OPEN GATE 1978

    Excellent! One can almost smell the burnt AVTUR.. Also hugely nostalgic - did my air movements course in late 1978, culminating with a hands-on practical, moving a Nimrod det from Kinloss to Gib that December.
  5. View File FAA Skyrays It is little-known history* that in the late 1950s, their Lordships of the Admiralty recognised that the Supermarine Scimitar was an unmitigated failure. As an American observer noted at the time, only the British could build a jet fighter with 22,000lbs thrust, that still remained stubbornly subsonic. Not only was its performance rather disappointing (British understatement?), the Scimitar was extremely unreliable. At one point it required 1000 maintenance hours per flying hour, and over 50% of the Scimitar fleet was lost in accidents. Its best contribution to the Fleet, was as a Ground Instructional Airframe (which is where the author first saw one, at RNAS Arbroath in the late 1960s). In an act of some desperation, therefore, in 1958 the Admiralty cancelled the remaining 50% of Scimitar production, and instead discreetly obtained 40 F4D-1 Skyrays from US Navy stocks. Capt Eric (“Winkle”) Brown was highly influential in this decision. A navy test pilot with the world record for carrier take-offs and landings (2,407 and 2,271 respectively), and an objectively strong advocate of American naval ac designs, his advice on procuring the Skyray was decisive. (Besides, he was a Scotsman. From the right side of the country)(ie the East Coast - did I mention that I'm from Arbroath?). Modified to carry the British Firestreak IR missile, and also to perform the light strike/attack role, the F4D-1 thus entered RN service as the Skyray F1. These ac proved to be particularly useful on the smaller British carriers, Victorious, Centaur and Hermes. For example, in Hermes, the Skyray allowed 892 Sqn to deploy a full 12-ac sqn, instead of the originally-mooted 8-ac Sea Vixen "sqn-lite". This had the serendipitious additional social advantage of eliminating all the Sea Vixen coal-hole observers from the Wardroom. Later in their career, 20 RN Skyrays were modified to FAW2 standard. This entailed replacing the original AN/APQ-50A radar with a lightweight version of the Lightning's AI23 "Airpass" radar, installing compatibility for both the Red Top all-aspect IR missile and the US Bullpup AGM, and replacing the original 4 x Colt 20mm cannon with a harder-hitting package of 4 x ADEN 30mm cannon (albeit with halved ammunition loads). Deployed in HMS Victorious in 1965 during the Malaysian Confrontation, one of these Skyray FAW2’s shared with an RAF Javelin in the double kill of 2 Indonesian C-130B’s, caught in the act of attempting to infiltrate Indonesion paratroopers into Borneo. The RN’s Skyrays were finally retired with the decommissioning of HMS Eagle in 1972. Their last service was to familiarise a generation of FAA pilots with USN ac types, in preparation for the introduction of the superlative F-4K Phantom (another Winkle Brown protogé). *Alternative history. The reader is encouraged to decipher what is fact, and what is fiction above. For it is not all the latter.. :) Installation: the usual, simply download and unzip the "Objects" folder, and drop it into your SF2 mod directory of preference. Always always always backup your original stuff before trying out new mods like this. Credits: this mod is based on the SF2 Skyray 1.1 mod, which I think is the work of Julhelm and NeverEnough. Regret not sure to whom credit is due for the Firestreak, Red Top and Bullpup missiles, and the SNEB Can, so if I missed you out, sorry, but I tip my hat to you! Legal Stuff: all the usual disclaimers, ie use at own risk, always always always backup your original stuff before trying out new mods like this (bears repeating). Plus this mod is consistent with both Queen's Regulations for the Royal Navy, and the Official Secrets Act. Cheers, Tally-Ho etc Mike D Submitter Mike Dora Submitted 05/08/2020 Category What If Hangar  
  6. FAA Skyrays

    Version 1.0.0

    56 downloads

    It is little-known history* that in the late 1950s, their Lordships of the Admiralty recognised that the Supermarine Scimitar was an unmitigated failure. As an American observer noted at the time, only the British could build a jet fighter with 22,000lbs thrust, that still remained stubbornly subsonic. Not only was its performance rather disappointing (British understatement?), the Scimitar was extremely unreliable. At one point it required 1000 maintenance hours per flying hour, and over 50% of the Scimitar fleet was lost in accidents. Its best contribution to the Fleet, was as a Ground Instructional Airframe (which is where the author first saw one, at RNAS Arbroath in the late 1960s). In an act of some desperation, therefore, in 1958 the Admiralty cancelled the remaining 50% of Scimitar production, and instead discreetly obtained 40 F4D-1 Skyrays from US Navy stocks. Capt Eric (“Winkle”) Brown was highly influential in this decision. A navy test pilot with the world record for carrier take-offs and landings (2,407 and 2,271 respectively), and an objectively strong advocate of American naval ac designs, his advice on procuring the Skyray was decisive. (Besides, he was a Scotsman. From the right side of the country)(ie the East Coast - did I mention that I'm from Arbroath?). Modified to carry the British Firestreak IR missile, and also to perform the light strike/attack role, the F4D-1 thus entered RN service as the Skyray F1. These ac proved to be particularly useful on the smaller British carriers, Victorious, Centaur and Hermes. For example, in Hermes, the Skyray allowed 892 Sqn to deploy a full 12-ac sqn, instead of the originally-mooted 8-ac Sea Vixen "sqn-lite". This had the serendipitious additional social advantage of eliminating all the Sea Vixen coal-hole observers from the Wardroom. Later in their career, 20 RN Skyrays were modified to FAW2 standard. This entailed replacing the original AN/APQ-50A radar with a lightweight version of the Lightning's AI23 "Airpass" radar, installing compatibility for both the Red Top all-aspect IR missile and the US Bullpup AGM, and replacing the original 4 x Colt 20mm cannon with a harder-hitting package of 4 x ADEN 30mm cannon (albeit with halved ammunition loads). Deployed in HMS Victorious in 1965 during the Malaysian Confrontation, one of these Skyray FAW2’s shared with an RAF Javelin in the double kill of 2 Indonesian C-130B’s, caught in the act of attempting to infiltrate Indonesion paratroopers into Borneo. The RN’s Skyrays were finally retired with the decommissioning of HMS Eagle in 1972. Their last service was to familiarise a generation of FAA pilots with USN ac types, in preparation for the introduction of the superlative F-4K Phantom (another Winkle Brown protogé). *Alternative history. The reader is encouraged to decipher what is fact, and what is fiction above. For it is not all the latter.. :) Installation: the usual, simply download and unzip the "Objects" folder, and drop it into your SF2 mod directory of preference. Always always always backup your original stuff before trying out new mods like this. Credits: this mod is based on the SF2 Skyray 1.1 mod, which I think is the work of Julhelm and NeverEnough. Regret not sure to whom credit is due for the Firestreak, Red Top and Bullpup missiles, and the SNEB Can, so if I missed you out, sorry, but I tip my hat to you! Legal Stuff: all the usual disclaimers, ie use at own risk, always always always backup your original stuff before trying out new mods like this (bears repeating). Plus this mod is consistent with both Queen's Regulations for the Royal Navy, and the Official Secrets Act. Cheers, Tally-Ho etc Mike D
  7. SF2 The Forest Bowl Terrain, V.2

    Like it Wrench! Quite reminds me of the Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania. It’s like a “Lost World”, with a floor is about 5000 ft above sea level, and a unique ecosystem plus unique species, quite separate from the environment outside its ~11 mile diameter crater wall. Did a very enjoyable safari there (with a rather lovely friend ;) back in 2003. On a more prosaic note, was amused by your inclusion of a location called Easthaven. Easthaven is just 5 miles south of my home town in Scotland, Arbroath, Changing subject slightly, have enjoyed “flying” around your forest bowl terrain in Royal Navy FAA Skyrays FAW1 and FAW2. ”More to follow” as they say.. Cheers and stay well Mike
  8. London Bridge Attack

    British Poles don’t always need Spitfires. Sometimes a narwhal tusk is enough* 😉 *forgive bias. When I went to RAFC Cranwell in 1976, Deputy Commandant Air Cdre Maisner was from Warsaw 🇬🇧🇵🇱🇵🇱🇬🇧. We had 16 Polish sqns during WW2, last RAF Polish veterans didn’t finally wash out until 1980s. **tragic though that 2 died. When will the bad guys learn that it doesn’t work, esp in Britain? cf Glasgow airport attack 2007, defeated by a baggage handler.
  9. Radio Control Dambusters

  10. Reichenberg II

    I believe that “theoretically” it wasn’t a suicide bomb, the official idea was that the pilot would set the thing on course to the target, release the canopy, then clamber out (no bang seat), and parachute down to safety (captivity?). However. Consider that it would be doing 350kt or more, look at that great big pulse jet right above and behind the cockpit, and imagine the chances of a successful bale out. Not perhaps a job for a chap seeking a long and successful career in the Luftwaffe. Mike
  11. Red Ten is the spare, it always goes with the team on overseas deployments. It also acts as a camera ship for occasions like this. But - what happened to the Blue Angels? Over here in NY we were told that it was going to be a combined Reds/Blues/Thunderbirds/F-35 flypast. Sadly I missed it anyway, was down at the Jersey shore, though I did see the Reds when they were over here about 10 years ago. Mike
  12. Just remember that the old Ark’s full air group was: 14 Buccs, 10 Phantoms, 4 Gannets, 8 Sea Kings, and 2 (plane guard) Wessex. At least that’s what she carried when I had the privilege to be on board back in 1978. Mike
  13. Russian bombers: 'Good morning, American pilots

    All this illustrates is the level of ignorance in modern society. Fifty-year-old Russian bombers make routine approach to US coastline, just like we do to theirs? Shock horror! It’s like the British press breathlessly announcing stuff like “the RAF intercepted 5-6 Russian planes approaching Britain last year”. During the Cold War we intercepted 2-3/week.. As for the quoted “greeting”? Just normal aircrew-aircrew banter, nothing more.
  14. The first 20-25 minutes brought back memories of Initial Officer Training there in 1976-77. The combat kit & the rifles were different, but the RAF Regiment SNCOs treated us with just the same fond loving care! The nephew of a friend of mine is at Cranwell right now, from all reports the initial stages are still the same.. :)) PS made me smile to see the same RAF issue _furniture_ in the cadets’ rooms, as we were still using 20 years later.
  15. Maybe Rumpler built upon the Fokker “stealth” Cellon covering experiment?
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