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New Chinook

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Considering its been around since the 1960's. But it seems to be a very capable aircraft if they are making a further version of it.

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Yeah, the 47F is a new variant. The funny thing is the Army is buying brand new ones at the same time they're upgrading old Ds. So which is the better deal? :huh:

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The UK bought some upgraded ones (digital cockpits & all) a few years ago for Special Forces Ops.

& they have sat in a hangar ever since they were delivered as the RAF refuses to certify them as safe to fly - I don't know the full details but afaik it centres around the control system. :dntknw:

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The Air Force annouced in January (I think) they will replace the MH-53's with the their version of the Chinook for Spec Ops crews. I read it in the Jan. issue of the Air Force Times. What's old is new again.

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The Air Force annouced in January (I think) they will replace the MH-53's with the their version of the Chinook for Spec Ops crews. I read it in the Jan. issue of the Air Force Times. What's old is new again.

Apparently that tender is being re-opened again for whatever reasons ...

 

Whilst it's a great aircraft & can operate at ranges & heights that other choppers can't it's not exactly quiet which you would have thought would be an advantage .

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I don't know the full details but afaik it centres around the control system.

 

Buff, as I understand it MOD being cheap b******s decided not to buy the full digital cockpit and avionics, but thought they could save money by having the old analogue stuff for the flight instruments etc. and the digital stuff just for things like the FLIR and Radar. This is much like going to your local car dealer and saying I'd like a cassette player, not a CD, and I'm sure all that electronic traction control is a waste of money too just take it out. So in the end Boeing made a bespoke Chinook which strangely wasn't much cheaper if any than buying the off the shelf fully digital one. Then when Boscombe started flight testing it they found it wouldn't pass the UK mil standards for various things mainly because some idiot had decided to have cheap old analogue instruments which no one else had ordered in about a decade and therefore tend not to be that well supported.

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I don't like things that fall straight down when the engine stops. I have been in a UH-1, CH-53E, CH-46. It's all fine and good but, I crack up when people are surprised when a chopper goes down for mechanical or as a result of enemy action. Nothing surprising about it at all if you ask me. I watched a CH-47 lift a c-47 w/wings removed from a local airfield to Travis AFB for their museum. Granted this was after they tried with the wings on :dntknw:

 

061206-F-2298C-008.jpg061206-F-2298C-003.jpg061206-F-2298C-006.jpg

Members of the California Air National Guard provide airlift with a CH-47 Chinook helicopter in relocating a C-47 Skytrain aircraft from Nut Tree Regional Airport in Vacaville, Calif. to Travis AFB. The C-47 was donated by Mr. Duncan Miller of Vacaville, Calif. to the Jimmy Doolittle Air and Space Museum Foundation. The C-47 will be restored and displayed along with the 30 other aircraft in the museum's collection. This aircraft has a storied history having been one of the aircraft to participate in the invasion of Normandy during World War II. (Photo by David W. Cushman, DAFC)

Edited by USMC Hawker

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The Russians do things my way. If you take fire from a building that block should be cleared by a massive air strike first then troops on the ground. Not the other way around.

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The UK bought some upgraded ones (digital cockpits & all) a few years ago for Special Forces Ops.

& they have sat in a hangar ever since they were delivered as the RAF refuses to certify them as safe to fly - I don't know the full details but afaik it centres around the control system. :dntknw:

well, the latest news is that the MoD is going to spend £60m to get these 8 or 9 airframes operational - by downgrading their avionics ...

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well, the latest news is that the MoD is going to spend £60m to get these 8 or 9 airframes operational - by downgrading their avionics ...

 

Yeah, I think the idea is to have commonality with the other Chinooks and forget about the SF side of things to some extent. A similar thing happened when some second hand Puma were bought from South Africa where the engines had anticipators (little things on the engine controls so when you pull collective the engines spool up before the rotors start slowing down). As the RAF fleet doesn't have them they were taken off, genius.

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Thing is that the cost of remanufacturing a CH-47D (i.e. a 20 year old bird) to CH-47Fs is reportedly $8.5 million & that incl. new engines etc. so why are we paying ~$12 million per aircraft just for downgraded avionics ...?

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I don't like things that fall straight down when the engine stops. I have been in a UH-1, CH-53E, CH-46. It's all fine and good but, I crack up when people are surprised when a chopper goes down for mechanical or as a result of enemy action. Nothing surprising about it at all if you ask me. I watched a CH-47 lift a c-47 w/wings removed from a local airfield to Travis AFB for their museum. Granted this was after they tried with the wings on :dntknw:

 

061206-F-2298C-008.jpg061206-F-2298C-003.jpg061206-F-2298C-006.jpg

Members of the California Air National Guard provide airlift with a CH-47 Chinook helicopter in relocating a C-47 Skytrain aircraft from Nut Tree Regional Airport in Vacaville, Calif. to Travis AFB. The C-47 was donated by Mr. Duncan Miller of Vacaville, Calif. to the Jimmy Doolittle Air and Space Museum Foundation. The C-47 will be restored and displayed along with the 30 other aircraft in the museum's collection. This aircraft has a storied history having been one of the aircraft to participate in the invasion of Normandy during World War II. (Photo by David W. Cushman, DAFC)

I'm trying to figure out how a goony bird with no wings or props can move that chinook from below like that. :ph34r:

 

 

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I don't like things that fall straight down when the engine stops. I have been in a UH-1, CH-53E, CH-46. It's all fine and good but, I crack up when people are surprised when a chopper goes down for mechanical or as a result of enemy action. Nothing surprising about it at all if you ask me. I watched a CH-47 lift a c-47 w/wings removed from a local airfield to Travis AFB for their museum. Granted this was after they tried with the wings on :dntknw:

 

061206-F-2298C-008.jpg061206-F-2298C-003.jpg061206-F-2298C-006.jpg

Members of the California Air National Guard provide airlift with a CH-47 Chinook helicopter in relocating a C-47 Skytrain aircraft from Nut Tree Regional Airport in Vacaville, Calif. to Travis AFB. The C-47 was donated by Mr. Duncan Miller of Vacaville, Calif. to the Jimmy Doolittle Air and Space Museum Foundation. The C-47 will be restored and displayed along with the 30 other aircraft in the museum's collection. This aircraft has a storied history having been one of the aircraft to participate in the invasion of Normandy during World War II. (Photo by David W. Cushman, DAFC)

 

ironick as Ch-47 replace the C-47 as troop trans

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