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Rick Rawlings

What? A Rick Rawlings Challenge?

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1 hour ago, RAF_Louvert said:

And now I'm off to the Castle Anthrax to inquire about a grail and ... no, wait, different sketch.  Sorry, as you were. 

Watch out for flying cows!

 

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Well,  it is getting to be Saturday in some parts of the world, so when that applies to you, feel free to get 'er started! One other point is that having played around now in the new version, balloons are still super easy to take down, so remember Gentlemen's Honor to only attack the assigned one.

Edited by Rick Rawlings

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3 hours ago, RAF_Louvert said:

See, cows ARE a threat.  :grin:

I knew you would say that!

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my stick is still a saitek x52.

don't die.  don't die.  don't die.

 

and just how the heck do you guys do those videos and get in-combat screenies?

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51 minutes ago, lofty_c said:

 

and just how the heck do you guys do those videos and get in-combat screenies?

For me it's the newer version of shadowplay that comes with the GeForce Experience app and runs on newer NVidia cards.

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8 hours ago, Rick Rawlings said:

Well,  it is getting to be Saturday in some parts of the world, so when that applies to you, feel free to get 'er started!

Yep Saturday arvo here as I type. I'll put something together shortly. Pretty uneventful as it turned out but that's the vagaries of war! A clip will be included. After luncheon but ....

And thanks for those fellows who provided their sticks. I'm liking the Thrustmaster T16000m. Is it good? But sticks are expensive these days (for me) so we'll see .... 

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2nd Lt "Spiv" Taylor embarks on his first sortie with 40 Squadron RFC on the morning of 11th Nov 1917. Mannock leads the line patrol. It is a chilly but fine, cloudy day. The flight is totally uneventful with no huns sighted. If this is war in the air, Spiv observes, it is a lark. The flight returns safely to base with no casualties. Upon entering the Mess bar, Spiv meets up with "Chuffs" and a plot is hatched.

The below filmography documents the events.

 

 

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...And we're off! Excellent start, catch! And you didn't die, which was the cherry on top of that awesome video!

 

I do like my T16000m, but I don't have much experience with anything else. I used a Saitek Av8r for years and this definitely beats that. I only have the joystick part and not the throttle quadrant, so I can't talk about that component, although a buddy of mine has both the T16000m and the throttle and likes it quite a bit.

Edited by Rick Rawlings
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Good stuff catch... but stop larking about when you are landing, you'll have the C.O. hounding you if you wreck that kite!  :no:

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Waddaya mean Troops? I always land like that. Triggers learned me real good.

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Personal Journal

Turner, Archibald 2nd Lt.
40 RFC

(Previous blather)
3 September 1917- arrived at the flying school this morning, and as usual I have no idea what I’m doing.  I’m honestly surprised those in charge can still speak after all that yelling.  Well, if my mother can do it, so can they, eh?

7 September 1917- sorry for lac of entries, last few days have been rather hectic.  I’ve been singled out as the swagger stick target for one of the instructors here (Capt. Triggers).  I’d rather be back home playing hockey or ruggers...something non-violent in comparison to Swaggers.  Bastard.

18 October 1917- letter from home.  Apparently troubles in the backrooms of the hockey league, possibility of a new league.  National Hockey League. I like that.  Well, something to look forward to in the far future.  Harvest was good, this bottle of rye from home even better.  Getting ready to solo navigate.  Less welts this week.

25 October 1917- graduated.  Received a posting to France.  40 RFC.  Was given ten days leave but when Swaggers apologised to me for his stick, well I just had to punch him in the mouth.  Luckily the CO seemed to understand, so instead of jail I have pulled five days guard duty before five days of leave.  Rather fair I’d say.

09 November 1917- arrived in Bruay.  The aerodrome is small but lively. Have met some of the new lads– good bunch I’d hazard.  The veterans don’t say much.  I’ve been given the rest of the day and tomorrow to get familiar with the area.  I’m assigned as wingman to “Old Naps” Napier.  Not an auspicious meeting...all the man did was stare at me.  Well, it’s late, I better have a gander at the maps.

(Current Days)

11 November 1917- first operation, a patrol over some place called Merville.  Just ‘B’ Flight this morning, so Napier and myself, along with Harrison, Tudhope, Wallwork, and Macsomething.  Weather was mainly thick broken clouds, some rain down at ground.  Somehow I managed not to crack up on take off and followed Napier easily.  By 0825 we’d formed up over the aerodrome and headed north for Merville.

At 0833 I lost my bloody map over the side.  I was trying to compare what I was seeing and well it just got yanked out of my hands.  We reached 10,000 feet by 0845.  My neck is thoroughly chafed.  As ‘Ass End Charlie’ I’m constantly spinning my head looking for the Hun.  I tried to keep an inflight log but after I lost my scarf at 0850 I then dropped my pencil and saw it roll under the decking near the firewall so no more notes.

After swanning about for a little while we headed back to Bruay and landed.  It was only then I realized we were missing a man. Wallwork was forced down by a mechanical failure and crashed.  Total time in the air 71 minutes.  Napier actually clapped me on the shoulder.

 

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111117Mission1c.jpg

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11 November 2017 - Flew my first combat mission with RFC 40 as part of a 7-plane gaggle led by Mannock, assigned to fly a defensive patrol. Weather was overcast with rain. Flying conditions above the rainclouds though were fine. I was not optimistic about our chances to see any action. The Germans are usually loathe to send aircraft over the British lines and when they do, they are usually bloody two-seaters. I do not relish the thought of engaging two-seaters, as they shoot back when attacked from the rear.

As our formation flew along its assigned patrol route, I spotted 3+ aircraft to the west and so broke off to investigate. As I bored in I counted 7 puffs, a mixture of Archie and aircraft. These aircraft prøved to be Albatross V-strutters, perhaps 3 in number. I think at this time we were at 8000 ft.

The one I picked to attack was on the ball and turned into me and fired head-on. I fired back but was nervous and missed. Then we began going round and round. And round. I could hear the engines of other enemy scouts buzzing behind me but did not care to look back. I was convinced the Se5a could outfly any Albatross in the skies and so concentrated solely on my target.

To my chagrin, catching the enemy V-strutter proved quite a struggle. My mount was not getting nearly as many RPMs as it had been when flying safely in formation with Mr. McElroy and Mannock. Had the Albatross hit my Se5a in the head-on attack ? At last I achieved a firing position at medium distance and commenced, getting in 2-3 bursts while the Albatross executed a wide climbing turn. All the while I struggled to keep my Se5a from stalling.

I then began hearing the sound of machine guns behind me, but dismissed this as a ruse to get me to break off my attack on their comrade. I had been told that the Albatross could not turn with an Se5a as long as the Se5a maintained a climbing attitude at the same time. However, as I lined up another burst at the V-strutter I was chasing, the machine guns behind me chattered yet again, this time scoring hits on the wings and airframe of my craft.

I jerked the nose of my Se5a down and dove, the machine guns behind me chattering occasionally. When I judged I had built up enough speed, I jerked the joystick back into my stomach and my mount shot up and around until we hung upside down in the air. However, after this things did not go as planned as my attempted loop sputtered at its apex and my aircraft flopped down into a stall.

Fortunately, the Se5 is a forgiving  ride and stalls gently. I righted her and then tried to look in every direction at once. There ! I spied two dots against the clouds, one towards the sun and the other away. I coaxed my mount towards the nearest one, this time glancing over my shoulder occasionally to avoid being surpised again by a rear attack.

As I gradually closed the distance on the lone V-strutter, I noticed for the first time that the Albatross had a golden diamond shape on the fuselage and a gold diamond gracing the horizontal stabilizers/elevators. Quite fetching, I thought. After a sufficient period (I had thought the Se5a could catch up to anything in an instant), I lined up a long-range shot thru my distance sights, thumped my rabbitsfoot hanging around my neck, and let fly. My second burst must have hit him, for the scout seemed to squirm and then commenced to hopping about like a cat trying to avoid a broom. This allowed me to close to a reasonable and I now began peppering the fellow nicely.

While I fired, at the same time I willed the enemy machine to begin falling but it did not cooperate. Instead it soldiered on towards its own lines. It seemed I had just begun when suddenly the firing stopped. I was out of ammunition! What next, I thought as I followed along after the V-strutter. Then I remembered that my Lewis MG should have another canister left and that I should re-arm the Lewis. However, just as I realized this the Albatross dropped its nose to the left, and began to spin downward.

I followed after it at a leisurely pace and was rewarded with the sight of it crashing inside our lines. Jubilant, I consulted the onboard compass and set a course for Bruay, our airfield. After a minute or two, I noticed blood on the floor of the cockpit. ??? For the first time I noticed that the flying leathers of my right leg were bloody. I then made a beeline for the nearest aerodrome and landed, not wanting to take any chances. After a small bit of medical attention, I called No. 40 Squadron and they promised to pick me up after 1 PM. By 4 PM I was back home at Bruay, in time to be debriefed and then eat supper with the rest of my flight.

 

 

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jeepers, new guy  in the squadron, and they put me in with Tudhope, Mannock, and McIlroy.  I get the feeling that these guys know their stuff, and I am definitely the "weak link" in our formation.  

I've spent a while learning the area, and this morning was my first real patrol with the guys, around the line by Lens (don't die!).  Capt. Creaghorn took us up to about 12, 000, and then up to the lines.  And while I'm thinking of how high we are, there's a bunch more above us.  Not only that, but Capt Creaghorn starts maneuvering  and climbing - must be Huns, but darned if I can tell.  Yup they are, and they came down to mix it up with us (don't die!).  Pretty much lost sight of everyone in a few seconds, still don't get how a dozen birds can just disappear, when I caught sight of two circling each other below.  Well, for a bit anyway, before I lost them, this time for good (don't die!).  Climbed back up to about 10,000, headed north for a bit, but didn't dee a thing, so I headed home.  For some reason, everyone else went to another, more forward, field, so that's why I didn't see anyone else all the way home.  I felt bad for not bagging any huns, but it turns out only Lt. Wallace put in a claim.  Mick says I did just fine, as he took a few months to get settled, and after all, I didn't die!

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Cecil Saidwick

40 Sqn

 

11 Nov 1917.  Bit of a scrap on Patrol, Bagged a Hun.

 

CFS3 2021-05-29 11-00-09-42.jpg

CFS3 2021-05-29 11-00-26-88.jpg

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Nice work, everybody! Reports are all excellent! It's interesting to see how we all pull different missions and how the experience changes because of that! Remember that this is not like DiD, you can fly each week's missions as you are able, even multiple a day. I will have to get a bunch of them in on the weekend...

Wallwork, we will probably appreciate those quiet missions as we are getting short later!

CastelEtzwane I was a little nervous when I saw the cracked windshield, but glad you are ok and congratulations!

lofty_c, glad you didn't die!

carrick58, congratulations! I also had a run-in with some Pfalzes!

Timothy Tully

Nov 11, 1917

Behind Friendly Line Patrol

Tully Miss01.jpg

Mission 1 Results.jpg

This was actually my most exciting and crowded WOFF mission in some time! Lots of fun!

Edited by Rick Rawlings
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Some fine reports gents! It looks like we are off to a fine start. And so far, everyone is still alive.

Catch, I must say, stunning video mate! Love the music. It seemed to go with a no contact mission.

 

Jethro Tull Bodine

Nov. 11, First Patrol. Bodine was with six others on a patrol of our lines from Bethune to Vimy. All was going well when a group of Hun scouts dove from above. What a round up! Planes buzzing all over the place. Bodine got on the tail of one and gave him "what fer". The Phalz rolled over and went straight down so Bodine pulled up and spied another one pouring smoke from his engine. It didn't take long before Bodine sent him spinning toward the ground. He saw him make a "right nice Gopher hole” near that long stretch of mud everyone calls no mans land. He looked around and everyone was skeedadling home so he did the same.

"I got two of the Buzzards!" he yelled at MacScotch. MacScotch shook his head, "Not hardly mate. That first one spun down but pulled up and left!" Bodine was dumbfounded. "Ya mean them Huns play Possum! Oh well, I got one then."

JTm1.thumb.jpg.b89240db5de540363ee693106c5d60ef.jpg

 

Edited by Mfair621
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25 minutes ago, Mfair621 said:

 

"I got two of the Buzzards!" he yelled at MacScotch. MacScotch shook his head, "Not hardly mate. That first one spun down but pulled up and left!" Bodine was dumbfounded. "Ya mean them Huns play Possum! Oh well, I got one then."

But who's counting, right? Great first post, Mfair! That view is the one we all love to have

Quote

 

Edited by Rick Rawlings

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Great stuff chaps... glad to see no one has been killed so far on their first outing with 40 Sqn.

I'll have a video up shortly  :pilotfly:

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First patrol with 2nd Lt 'Pixie' Turkington Smythe...

Pixie_1.jpg

 

I haven't done a lot of video editing so you will have to forgive my clumsy attempt out with Pixie for the first time.

''An autumn day like no other'' was the first thing Pixie told his chief mechanic on his return from that first patrol.

Nervous, twitchy and desperately not trying to mess up was foremost on his mind after taking off and trying to form up.

Being nervous was the least of his worries as they neared the front lines. One minute he was quite pleased with himself as he held formation and was starting to relax into the flight.

The next minute, everything went for a ball of chalk as the whole flight just seemed to scatter as a bunch of Huns just charged in out of nowhere!

''I had no idea what on earth was happening, until rounds starting hitting my aeroplane... that woke me up I can tell you''.

Eventually he found himself shooting at some Hun in a black and white albatross, but lost him, then found another who was trying to scarper back over the lines and managed to bring him down... ''What luck''!

Put a claim in with the adjutant telling him what to do, so now he waits... in the bar, obviously!

 

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Nice one Trooper! Lot of success stories on the first day. Good on everyone. 

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1 hour ago, TROOPER117 said:

 

I haven't done a lot of video editing so you will have to forgive my clumsy attempt out with Pixie for the first time.

 

I don't know what you're talking about, that video was awesome! Except for the part where I almost had a heart attack because I thought you had collided with someone! Congratulations on the victory!

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Great videos, stories, pictures, fellas.  Good fun. :drinks:

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I'm enjoying these vids/pics/stories immensely. Congrats to all the participants so far. Looking forward to future entries. Great comp Rick. :good:

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