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scouserlad13

What to do when in a rip? Interesting Story, read here

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Well, today i was down at the gold coast beach minding my own business when as i was walking to the sea for a swim, a 14 year old girl (i think she was 14) came up to me with a look of panic on her face. She told me her 2 brothers where stuck in a rip about 30ft out.

So with me not thinking, i ran out into the sea to go and rescue them. The current in the water was extremely strong and the waves where going over my head. And i am about 6ft tall. Anyway, i continued on til i got to the boys. They looked about 8 or 9. And they where shouting for help, so i went over to them and tried to calm them down, which they did and i explained to them that they had to just keep kicking and swimming as hard as they can and when a wave comes behind them that they should try to ride it in. So they did that while pushing me under water because they where panicing a little bit. But we only managed to get about 10ft because the current was so strong and i was going under the water every few seconds because of the two boys trying to grab hold of me.

Luckily my dad jumped up and came diving in followed by another man, my dad came to help me with the boys and we managed to get them out. They where safe and sound, but rather distressed and tired after all the swimming against the current they had to do.

The lifeguards came just as we got them out. (They wernt swimming between the flags, and because i am a good swimmer i wasnt either, i know its stupid and i have learnt my lesson about swiming in between the flags, and i usually do anyway.)

 

But from this experience, i was just wondering, what should i ever do if i get caught in a rip and the lifeguards are not near? How do i get out of the rip? Just keep swimming to shore as hard as i can, or is there any other way to get out of it?

 

Cheers Scouserlad13

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Well, today i was down at the gold coast beach minding my own business when as i was walking to the sea for a swim, a 14 year old girl (i think she was 14) came up to me with a look of panic on her face. She told me her 2 brothers where stuck in a rip about 30ft out.

So with me not thinking, i ran out into the sea to go and rescue them. The current in the water was extremely strong and the waves where going over my head. And i am about 6ft tall. Anyway, i continued on til i got to the boys. They looked about 8 or 9. And they where shouting for help, so i went over to them and tried to calm them down, which they did and i explained to them that they had to just keep kicking and swimming as hard as they can and when a wave comes behind them that they should try to ride it in. So they did that while pushing me under water because they where panicing a little bit. But we only managed to get about 10ft because the current was so strong and i was going under the water every few seconds because of the two boys trying to grab hold of me.

Luckily my dad jumped up and came diving in followed by another man, my dad came to help me with the boys and we managed to get them out. They where safe and sound, but rather distressed and tired after all the swimming against the current they had to do.

The lifeguards came just as we got them out. (They wernt swimming between the flags, and because i am a good swimmer i wasnt either, i know its stupid and i have learnt my lesson about swiming in between the flags, and i usually do anyway.)

 

But from this experience, i was just wondering, what should i ever do if i get caught in a rip and the lifeguards are not near? How do i get out of the rip? Just keep swimming to shore as hard as i can, or is there any other way to get out of it?

 

Cheers Scouserlad13

 

 

Horrible feeling to be drawn out to sea in a rip, luckily though, you can get out two ways. If you are feeling energetic, swim as hard as you can 90 degrees against the current, a rip is usually narrow enough that you can swim out to the side of it and then turn in to shore. Failing that if you are too tired, weak or lazy but casual about survival, float with it and hope it dissipates out until you can then start swimming at an angle away from it toward shore. The second way will require a lot more swimming in total but less frantic swimming to start with. In different circumstances, had you had the luxury of knowing that your dad and other people could summon help in the shape of a boat and the kids were slipping under with you, I would have probably suggested to you to get them to lay back and float with it.

 

I think you should get some recognition for this mate! Takes a real hero to jump in like that when you know it can go pear shape. Well done!

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I agree you should get some recognition for this also. Doing the right thing never seems to be an easy thing as you have shown in your story. Those kids were lucky that you came along.

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You are all extremely lucky. You should never try to swim against a rip tide, thats how people drown in them, they tire themselves out trying to swim directly to shore. You swim 90 degrees from the direction the current is going to get out of it, but let it take you in the direction its going, never swim against it.

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Good job! Glad everyone made it to shore ok. All too often you here of the rescuer drowning after saving someone else. I hate to throw around the "H" word, as there are way too many people that do what needs to be done without thinking of personal safety, and in my opinion, thats how you define the word, well, ok, ill say it, hero.

I was once in a situation where a police officer was wrestling some dude on the ground who was tryin to take his sidearm. I just stood there until the officer made eye contact with me. He didnt say a word, but his eyes screamed"I NEED HELP"

This old hippy never moved faster in his life, lol, and it was probly quite a site to see us rolling around that parking lot.

It wasnt till about 15 minutes later that I thought about it and my knees damn near turned to jelly. Only thing is, the cop never even said thanks, maybe he was caught up in it all, i dunno,, either way, I felt good inside about it, and thats what counts. Once again, good job!

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"Grace under presure" - I guess so you stayed calm enough to get the boys out - so many congratulations! Must admit Ive no idea what a rip is either!

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You are all extremely lucky. You should never try to swim against a rip tide, thats how people drown in them, they tire themselves out trying to swim directly to shore. You swim 90 degrees from the direction the current is going to get out of it, but let it take you in the direction its going, never swim against it.

Right! having lived near fast moving waters and rips you dont try to out power it stay calm as much as you can stay afloat and do as Eraser says as you ride the tide look for some thing to grab as this is easier said than done we tend to panic first. Great job to you and pops for doing what needed to be done :good::clapping: true HEROES!!

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"Grace under presure" - I guess so you stayed calm enough to get the boys out - so many congratulations! Must admit Ive no idea what a rip is either!

rip= riptide or undertow

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1. Swim Parallel to the shoreline out of the rip and undertow.

2. Smartly resume aquatic recreation in the marine shallow water environment. Sheila is watching you.

:ph34r: CL

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Thankyou all for your help, i just needed to know what to do if i ever got caught in a rip or got stuck in a situation like this again. And also thankyou for the recognition :good: but im not a hero, i just did what had to be done at the time. But i now respect how fit a lifeguard has to be to do the job. Thanks again :good:

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There is no set procedure, it's all a matter of judgment, based on the conditions. For example, imagine this scenario:

 

You go for a swim at your favorite beach, which is located along a coastline thats oriented North to South. That beach, slopes out perhaps 30-40 meters, where the bottom suddenly drops off, in effect goes from water that's chest deep, to a depth that's well over your head. For the past few days, a storm's been brewing well offshore, in fact, hundreds of miles offshore. You arrive at the strand, to see tall breakers booming ashore, and notice that while there are not too many people swimming around, there's plenty surfers out having a field day.

 

You wade in, and begin paddling out, and suddenly find yourself being tossed ashore in a heap by a breaking wave. Undaunted, you make your way out, determined not to get tossed ashore again. You soon find yourself in water that's chest-deep, except when the occasional breaker comes in, and lifts you several meters off the bottom. Tired of clowning around, you set out to swim back in. After a few minutes of effort, you find yourself tiring, and decide to stand up. That's when you notice that you're no longer in chest deep water, but have been carried out several dozen yards further offshore, by a rip-current. Following some one else's advice, you try swimming parallel to shore, only to find that you're still being carried further and further out. What do you do in this case?

 

This happens every Summer at our beaches in NJ. The tide travels north to south, and when combined with a storm surge (even from a distant Tropical storm), it results in some rather nasty rip tides.

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My answer on what to do... don't go out in the water at all. I never have, and never will. Riptides, sharks, jellyfish, poluted waters, toxic algae, kids peeing and pooping in the water, and most importantly.... EELS!!! which are many reasons why there is no sense in going into that environment.

 

 

Anyways, great job in the rescue. Doing what had to be done is still being a hero. It reminds me of a line from Live Free or Die Hard.

Edited by serverandenforcer

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13::

i explained to them that they had to just keep kicking and swimming as hard as they can and when a wave comes behind them that they should try to ride it in.

That happened to me. Mostly landlubber here, on lunch break, alone. Nice smooth aqua green BIG waves invited me off the beach into the warm ocean. Very nice bobbing up and down. Then bang I could see the shore *moving* away from me, and I had a moment of fear and a few moments of "this won't end well." But before panicking, somehow I managed to just think it out. So I just paddled water not trying to swim, then one of the BIG smooth waves came in and at the start I started swimming hard and rode the wave a good distance. I could feel the distance somehow and I knew I could make it then. Three or four more of these waves and I was walking on sand beneath. Scary stuff out there.

 

But try to **explain** procedure to somebody else out there, and 8 yo kids? Yikes. Well it worked for me one time, but I won't assume I can depend on that again. I never went back in alone, but I have gone back in.

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I like fresh water, but I hate saltwater. :wink: It just is too gritty for me.

 

That said, I've never lived farther than 15 miles from the Atlantic Ocean my entire life and I've been in it maybe a dozen times. It's a good way to keep away from sharks, jellyfish, riptides, and pointy things that you step on.

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