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JonathanRL

SAAB Viggen Emergency Landing Video

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2-Flight AJ-37 suffers birdstrike and have to emergency land at War Airfield David.

 

 

The video is from a movie, but yet it shows how it was done once upon a time...

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Hey, great movie, really great flying and full of nice drama (and a nice onboard tomato ketchup device too...) Obviously no "bird ingestion in the engine", otherwise no thrust reverser and the lenght of the landing strip would have been a problem I guess.

I remember the tag "Bränsle" from the days I owned a SAAB :grin: , drove 2 good old 96 two strokes in succession, my first cars, wtith Bränsle (fuel) gauges in the dashboard......:good:

Edited by Derk

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SPOILER ALERT

 

Hang on, was this the film where later on, that pilot dives into water and smacks his skull becoming a paraplegic?? If so, I still shudder thinking about the sick crunch from when he hits his head on the rock...

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The landing on such a small airstrip was impressive. :drinks:

 

Not for a Swedish Air Force pilot.

 

It was expected, and the aircraft designed around it.

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True. But it was a fine pilot job to land on such a small strip. Our pilots landed on the Autobahn (like motorway in england) but this landing stripes were not as small.

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The whole RSAF and most, if not all of its planes were designed around this unique and highly interesting dispersal concept. Zoom in for instance at Satenes airbase NE from Trolhättan at the Vännern Lake (been there during a holiday) at Google Earth. You'll find at least 3 road runways at road no. 44, with nearby roads in the woods flanked by dispersal parking spaces under camouflage netting, all of them connected to the main airbase by roads that can be used as taxiways.Two more small airfields near Lidköping also with dispersals and also connected to the road net. Everything within 30 km of the main airfield and belonging to the same complex.........Lots of bases had these dispersed runways. Impossible to take out a Swedish airbase by air attack !!!!

Especially the Viggen with its low landing speed and unique and very powerfull thrust reverser was very good at using these facilities....... Take a look at a Youtube airshow demo of a Viggen and you'll understand why........:good: :good: :good:

Jonathan should be able to tell a lot more about it.....

 

edit: and looking at the movie again it may very well be that they actually used one of the Road 44 strips .....

Edited by Derk

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The whole RSAF and most, if not all of its planes were designed around this unique and highly interesting dispersal concept.

 

It seems to me that the RAF was inspired by this particular organization to develop its strategy of the Harriers positioning, putting them under cover of woods and forest near a potential Western front.

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Damn birds ruining my play time! :grin:

 

Great clip there. Didn't know the Viggen could roll that quickly.

 

And the police Volvo's aggressive u-turn :rofl:

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Damn birds ruining my play tim

And the police Volvo's aggressive u-turn :rofl:

 

Probably to give the pilot a speeding ticket. AND do an alcohol check........

And of course the papers (insurance and tax etc.) have to be checked AND , because the moment the plane lands it is no longer a plane but a car, so the pilot must have a drivers license.......

Edited by Derk

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So...why were the silver Viggens bad? Was this the Swedish version of Iron Eagle or something?

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The Silver Viggens was their opposition for the training exercise, and was sent home when the mission was aborted.

Edited by JonathanRL

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fye_2AipFTA

 

One of my favorite

 

It pure genius the idea of dispersed airfields using a short straight strip of country road. The enemy will have a very hard time talking out the capability of an air force using this tactics

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGxRNuL6lfg&feature=related

 

Talk about staying cool. For those not understanding a word of Swedish its the pilot of the aircraft who stand and explain how he got out. Taking his time double checking to make sure he was free of any straps before he opened the canopy and climbed out.

 

As he put it in his own words. I didn't want to stay longer outside in the blaze than needed.

 

If its was me I probably would have asked for some clean underwear. :grin:

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fye_2AipFTA

 

One of my favorite

 

It pure genius the idea of dispersed airfields using a short straight strip of country road. The enemy will have a very hard time talking out the capability of an air force using this tactics

It's the complete opposite of the US Air Force's policy of assuming there will always be a 9000ft runway for them to operate from.

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That's been a choice dictated by money. Sweden had the luxury of dealing with smaller territory it seldom leaves. That means your force can consist entirely of smaller planes (like the Gripen) so making them STOL capable isn't a big deal. Simply put STOL requirements heavily impact design and resulted in tradeoffs that were often too far for what the plane was being designed to do.

 

That said, while STOL is a great idea in theory, in practice the last US airbase to be attacked to any real degree was in Vietnam, and there were always bases a little farther away that were outside that threat range. When the last serious threat was in Korea and WWII, you naturally see it as something that is of secondary importance. Doesn't mean it won't come back to bite you someday, but it makes the decision understandable.

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Well our model was built around the idea that in any hot war the Soviets would surely be tacti-nuking our airbases as a prelude to invasion, and as such it makes sense to disperse.

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