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MK2

OT: My Ace Autograph and memorabilia collection pictures

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UPDATED NEW PICS ON PAGE #2

UPDATED NEW PICS ON PAGE #3 (including Frank Luke)

UPDATED NEW PICS ON PAGE #4

 

I thought you might enjoy a look at some of the WW1 ace autograph pieces I have in my Ace collection (all wars):

 

 

 

Boelcke

Front

Boelcke.jpg

 

Back

Boelcke_back.jpg

 

Immelmann

 

Immelmann-1.jpg

 

Immelmann_back-1.jpg

 

Richthofen (authenticated by Der Rittmeister Milatary http://www.derrittmeister.com/)

 

Richthofen.jpg

 

Lothar Von Richthofen hand written envelope (signed)

Lothar.jpg

 

Udet

Udet.jpg

 

Von Schleich

Schleich.jpg

 

Friedrich Theodore Noltenius 21 Victories J27/J6/J11

Noltenius.jpg

 

Heinrich Bongartz 33 victories Jasta 36

Bongartz.jpg

 

Fritz Bernert 27 victories J4/J2

Bernert.jpg

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Fonck

Fonck.jpg

 

Guynemer

Guynemer.jpg

 

Lufbery

Lufbery_front.jpg

 

Lufbery_back.jpg

 

4th page of hand written letter by Nungesser

NungesserPage4ofLetter.jpg

 

Here is a hand drawn sketch by William Lambert 18 Victory ace / Captain 24 SQD

Lambert.jpg

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I enjoy seeing historical items.

 

Something very much to be proud of.

 

 

I have a number of baseball cards but it seems trivial to your collection

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that's amazing. i'm very impressed.

as you can see on the german cards, you can't read a single handwritten word. not even a german can read it anymore. it was called "sütterlin-schrift" and was very commom in those days, because it was fast, and readable for everybody. there are still some older people left who learned the style in school, but the more years pass, the less are remaining who can read and write this style. you can also see it clearly on the piece of paper MvR wrote as his last wish.

when the nazis got power in germany, this sütterlinstyle was banned from schools, because they considered it as "judenlettern", jewish letters.

i have still hundreds of letters at home, where the grand-grandfather of my ex-girflriend was in the trenches of flanders, writing home. so much history in those letters. unfortunately i can't read a thing because all is in sütterlin. i found out there are some places where you can let "translate" old letters or similar, but it's quite expensive.

 

by the way. i have some pokemon cards. would you like to trade some of your cards with some of my pikachu cards? :yes:

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Those are incredible MK2, simply incredible. I would love to be able to just see and hold each of those historic bits of paper for a moment to have that connecton to those historic figures. Take good care of them Sir.

 

Cheers!

 

Lou

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Hey MK2, they are really cool.

 

At home in Australia i have a painting (printed copy really) of Johnny Johnson leading a group of spitfires on D-Day. The good thing is though he has signed the print later in life at some stage. So it's his original signature on a print of this painting. It was handed down through family, i'd like to get it framed one day.

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Amazing collection! I'm pretty sure some people would pay a lot of money to get all of those... If you ever get tired of looking at them, I'm quite willing to accept donations. :biggrin:

 

When I was a student I took a couple of courses on old German handwriting styles and techniques - the examples we see in these cards and letters are actually quite readable compared to some of the really old stuff we had to decipher. I was never very good at it, but with enough time and tea/coffee I can still manage some translations...

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Amazing collection! I'm pretty sure some people would pay a lot of money to get all of those... If you ever get tired of looking at them, I'm quite willing to accept donations. :biggrin:

 

When I was a student I took a couple of courses on old German handwriting styles and techniques - the examples we see in these cards and letters are actually quite readable compared to some of the really old stuff we had to decipher. I was never very good at it, but with enough time and tea/coffee I can still manage some translations...

 

cool there are still people out there who learned how to read the old style. i would love once to know what he had written to his family from the trenches. some i even managed to translate. there is also a shrapnell wrapped in a letter where he said, it's from a melted churchbell. or other letters where he drawed trenches and how it looked like inside. there are even some letters in french and greek (he was a professor), some limericks where he wrapped the terrible things which happened, into limericks, to avoid cencorship. things like that.

but it's a ton of it. so if i would give it to translate to somebody, it should be somebody who earns money with it. it's too much for a hobby.

but if you want, i might send you some copies of the letters, just to see if you will remember your old lessons. maybe you'll have fun.

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Very impressive collection - they look so close suddenly.

Especially with Udet I had this impression.

Wonder how he felt in this funny special uniform (looks like one of Goering's designs).

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Bloody hell, that is some seriously special stuff! Imagine holding a card once held by MvR. I wonder if there's any of his DNA still on it? :blink:

 

Something like that, you can hold it and get a real sense of closeness.

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Bloody hell, that is some seriously special stuff! Imagine holding a card once held by MvR. I wonder if there's any of his DNA still on it? :blink:

 

Something like that, you can hold it and get a real sense of closeness.

 

 

exactly what i thought, siggi. what i thought about is, there are different cards and letters from people, fighting each other. and somehow, when i see all pics and letters together, i have the impression they might have been friends after war.

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Thank you for all the comments!

 

Do you think if I posted a picture of the letter I have signed by Hans Joachim Marseille of WW2 Luftwaffe Ace fame, it can be translated? I never got around to having it translated and would appreciate it knowing what it is about.

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Thank you for all the comments!

 

Do you think if I posted a picture of the letter I have signed by Hans Joachim Marseille of WW2 Luftwaffe Ace fame, it can be translated? I never got around to having it translated and would appreciate it knowing what it is about.

 

 

sure, post it. i don't think it's in sütterlin, so for sure the speaker of german language would translate it. even if it is, some here might be able to translate it.

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MK2, I am glad these things are in your hands. Thank you for sharing. You must feel a closeness to these men. I have a Rickenbacker and really appreciate it myself. I wonder if anybody has ever compiled a Sanke card collection to DVD.

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Rickity,

here's a website of the airial photographer Werner Dittmann.

There are photo albums (many!) and SANKE cards!

 

And I can read a little Sütterlin, so post the Marseille text, MK2!

Cheers; Olham

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I particularly like the letters and envelopes. Of course, they posed for thse pictures and then signed them, but the letters seem closer to a moment in their lives.

And the drawing. You or I draw it and it's an imaginative doodle. He'd probably seen something very like it not long before.

 

 

as you can see on the german cards, you can't read a single handwritten word. not even a german can read it anymore. it was called "sütterlin-schrift" and was very commom in those days, because it was fast, and readable for everybody. there are still some older people left who learned the style in school, but the more years pass, the less are remaining who can read and write this style. you can also see it clearly on the piece of paper MvR wrote as his last wish.

 

Having a very far reaching interest in history, I found this. Don't know if it will actually help anyone, but interesting nonetheless. I remember reading an article recently on the decline of handwriting in English as well, since most people today write relatively little by hand. So this struck a chord with me.

 

http://genealogy.about.com/gi/dynamic/offs...h/Sutterlin.htm

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cool there are still people out there who learned how to read the old style. i would love once to know what he had written to his family from the trenches. some i even managed to translate. there is also a shrapnell wrapped in a letter where he said, it's from a melted churchbell. or other letters where he drawed trenches and how it looked like inside. there are even some letters in french and greek (he was a professor), some limericks where he wrapped the terrible things which happened, into limericks, to avoid cencorship. things like that.

but it's a ton of it. so if i would give it to translate to somebody, it should be somebody who earns money with it. it's too much for a hobby.

but if you want, i might send you some copies of the letters, just to see if you will remember your old lessons. maybe you'll have fun.

 

You have quite the treasure in those letters, take good care of them! (Keep them away from too warm or cold and humid conditions.) My grandfathers and their fathers served in the army during the world wars, but they didn't leave behind very many written documents, at least I haven't found much.

 

There's no point in paying anybody for translations though - you can do it yourself! Wikipedia is a good place to start: (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsche_Schrift) and there are also guides you can buy if you're really interested in the old handwriting. You can also contact genealogical research groups, they specialize in this kind of thing and can help. I bet it's going to br some very exciting reading if you have plenty of old letters and you slowly begin to understand them!

 

The writing you can see in the cards of this thread isn't actually Sütterlin as such - it started to be taught in German schools only in the 1910s and pilots like Immelmann and Boelcke had received their basic education much earlier, but since Sütterlin is based on the earlier forms of writing, it of course has a lot in common with them. Understanding can be easy if the writer had a good hand, but some people write so badly it's really difficult to read it, even if you know the letters. Anyway, it's no rocket science! :biggrin:

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You have quite the treasure in those letters, take good care of them! (Keep them away from too warm or cold and humid conditions.) My grandfathers and their fathers served in the army during the world wars, but they didn't leave behind very many written documents, at least I haven't found much.

 

There's no point in paying anybody for translations though - you can do it yourself! Wikipedia is a good place to start: (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsche_Schrift) and there are also guides you can buy if you're really interested in the old handwriting. You can also contact genealogical research groups, they specialize in this kind of thing and can help. I bet it's going to br some very exciting reading if you have plenty of old letters and you slowly begin to understand them!

 

The writing you can see in the cards of this thread isn't actually Sütterlin as such - it started to be taught in German schools only in the 1910s and pilots like Immelmann and Boelcke had received their basic education much earlier, but since Sütterlin is based on the earlier forms of writing, it of course has a lot in common with them. Understanding can be easy if the writer had a good hand, but some people write so badly it's really difficult to read it, even if you know the letters. Anyway, it's no rocket science! :biggrin:

 

i found a kind of home for seniors (dunno how to say in english), where they offer openly to send them copies of old letters and other written material in sütterlin. they want no money, only some donation if you want to give. it's kind of hobby and work for them, to keep their minds busy and keep their brains in shape, so maybe i am going to contact them. of course i would donate.

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What an awesome collection. Like Siggi said just imagine touching something so historic. Very nice Thanks for sharing

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