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dtmdragon

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dtmdragon last won the day on May 18 2018

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About dtmdragon

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    Taupo NEW ZEALAND
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  1. No but it sounds like you haven't put the cockpit folder with the modified .tga files in the right place
  2. View File Mirage III & Nesher Gun Sight Fix. Mirage III and Nesher Gun Sight Fix. This mod corrects the Stock Third Wire Gun Sights for the Mirage IIICJ Shahak, Mirage IIICJ Shahak (71), Nesher and as a bonus the DLC 17 RAAF Mirage fighters. I recently read the Osprey book Israeli 'Mirage and Nesher Aces' and 'Mirage III vs Mig-21 Six Day War 1967.' Both books are full of gun camera images of Israeli Mirage IIICJ and Nesher fighters killing MIGs. From these I realised Third Wire has made an error on all the Mirage gun sights by aligning the (horizontally elongated) aircraft reference cross with the gun bore-sight and thus the gun piper. In the Nesher and Mirage IIIO that leaves the actual gun bore-sight cross sitting above the gun piper doing nothing. This mod corrects the position and alignment of the aircraft reference cross, gun piper and gun bore-sight cross (Nesher and Mirage IIIO). This correction should be applied to any other version of Mirage III, Mirage 5, Nesher or Dagger you have that uses a Third Wire Mirage cockpit and/ or Mirage gun sight. CombatAce fair use agreement applies. Cheers, Dan. Submitter dtmdragon Submitted 05/03/2019 Category Avionics  
  3. Mirage III & Nesher Gun Sight Fix.

    Version 1.0.0

    100 downloads

    Mirage III and Nesher Gun Sight Fix. This mod corrects the Stock Third Wire Gun Sights for the Mirage IIICJ Shahak, Mirage IIICJ Shahak (71), Nesher and as a bonus the DLC 17 RAAF Mirage fighters. I recently read the Osprey book Israeli 'Mirage and Nesher Aces' and 'Mirage III vs Mig-21 Six Day War 1967.' Both books are full of gun camera images of Israeli Mirage IIICJ and Nesher fighters killing MIGs. From these I realised Third Wire has made an error on all the Mirage gun sights by aligning the (horizontally elongated) aircraft reference cross with the gun bore-sight and thus the gun piper. In the Nesher and Mirage IIIO that leaves the actual gun bore-sight cross sitting above the gun piper doing nothing. This mod corrects the position and alignment of the aircraft reference cross, gun piper and gun bore-sight cross (Nesher and Mirage IIIO). This correction should be applied to any other version of Mirage III, Mirage 5, Nesher or Dagger you have that uses a Third Wire Mirage cockpit and/ or Mirage gun sight. CombatAce fair use agreement applies. Cheers, Dan.
  4. Actually I have a better idea. Have invisible tip tanks that can be jettisoned like I said above but make the 3d model of the tip tanks part of the aircraft LOD. Set up the node name of the tip tank as the pylon 'ModelNodeName=' for the weapon station carrying that tip tank. Set up the 'PylonMass=' and PylonDragArea=' vales with the figures for what the tip tank would be. Thus when you hit the jettison drop tanks key the 'invisible' drop tanks with the fuel will be gone but the 3d model of the tip tanks (as the pylon that was holding the 'invisible' drop tanks) will remain on the aircraft. This method doesn't use multiple loadout stations etc
  5. As a work around you could have the tip tanks be loaded as a non-jettison tank but have the fuel value set as zero. Set up on another hardpoint (but in the same position), have the actual wingtip tanks that carry fuel but these can be jettisoned and have no 3d model (so are invisible). Thus when you hit the jettison drop tanks key the 'invisible' tip tanks with the fuel will be jettisoned but the 3d model of the (empty) tip tanks will remain. You would set the weight and drag values of the 'invisible' to tanks to zero.
  6. Requiring pilots to be Officers is historically related to having an over supply of suitable candidates so thus the Armed Force in question has the luxury to make a Commission part of the requirements of the role. This helps with creating a smaller pool to recruit from initially and from the Armed Force's perspective provides an individual that (as a Commisioned Offcer) can be used in upper management roles in the future. That is why the RAF with a shortage of pilots in WWII used NCO pilots but post war shifted this to an Officer only role. It's worth noting that the RAF and most Commonwealth based Armed Forces do not require Officers to have a degree but undertake 'in house' selection with requirements based on leadership aptitude etc.
  7. Who knows mate, that one paragraph from the book is all the information I have but apparently it it authenticated on a few ex-Crusader pilot/ crew/ squadron forums?
  8. The USN A-4F Skyhawks that actually arrived during the height of the war as part of Operation Nickle Grass were repainted literally over night and put into service the day after they arrived fully re painted. The USAF F-4E were not since the SEA camaflage was deemed suitable until after the war. The USN grey was not.
  9. Quote from Osprey Combat Series F-8 Crusader Units Of The Vietnam War: "The Crusader's last months in Vietnam are filled with amazing stories, but none more incredible than that involving Cdr John Nichol's VF-24 in the Hancock in 1973 (...) and arrived at the southern end of the Red Sea as the third Arab-Israeli war was winding down (...) the squadron commanding officers of Air Wing 21 listened in amazement as they were told to stand by to fly their A-4 and F-8s to Israel and turn them over to the hard-pressed Israeli Air Force (...) However the Israelis had gained the upper hand in the war, and the Hancock was sent on its way back to the United States."
  10. Higher Res F-8 Crusader Skins with more panel line/ rivet detail, white missile rails, white missile rail adaptors on some skins, updated late Squadron markings for VF-211 and single AIM-9/ LAU-33 pylon mod for F-8D/E/H/J Edit: I just caught the error with the wing code on the VF-211 F-8J, needs to be NP not NF!
  11. F-8E US Navy SEA trial Camo: And Royal New Zealand Airforce:
  12. paulopanz's new Canberra B(I).8 bomber with a few tweaks to make it the RNZAF specific variant (ejection seat, pilot, no cannon pack, early style camo skin with white serials, Microcell rocket pods):
  13. Thanks mate! Decal folder seems to be missing from the download.
  14. I like the black on silver tail
  15. F-4E-41 Phantom II (69) RNZAF - Initial delivery batch of 11 Block 41 F-4E Phantom delivered in 1969 (first batch of a five year 16 aircraft order.) - Serial # NZ6201 to NZ6211. - Standard SEA camouflage and USAF stencils of the day. - Fitted "for but not with ECM" so RWR antenna, wiring and cockpit displays fitted but no computer to make it function. - Weapons procured includes Mk-80 series slick/ retarded bombs, AIM-9E, AIM-7E, LAU-10/A, and LAU-3/A First flight off the St. Louis assembly line. Early RNZAF Fern Leaf roundels - not popular! F-4E-41 Phantom II (72) RNZAF - Above aircraft after MIDAS4 gun muzzle modification in 1972 and instillation of low-voltage formation lights. - Decision for follow up purchase of RWR equipment deferred permanently so cockpit RWR displays removed. F-4E-41 Phantom II (74) RNZAF - Above aircraft with maneuvering slats fitted in 1974 via kit-sets procured with the second batch of Phantoms (Block 60) delivered below. F-4E-60 Phantom II (74) RNZAF - Second and final batch of 5 Block 60 F-4E Phantoms delivered in 1974. - Serial # NZ6212 to NZ6216. - Standard SEA camouflage and USAF stencils of the day (slightly different to the Block 41 aircraft as five years newer). - Fitted "for but not with ECM" so RWR antenna and wiring fitted but no computer to make it function. Cockpit RWR displays removed in RNZAF service. 1979ish, lower 'Camouflage Grey' color replaced with 'Light Gull Grey' as used on the RNZAF's P-3 Orion (this was done in real life on the RNZAF A-4K Skyhawks). 1984, F-4E fleet repainted in Euro 1 which better suits the New Zealand environment. F-4E-ARN Phantom II (84) RNZAF - 6 attrition replacements purchased and delivered in 1984 from current USAF F-4E fleet in preparation for RNZAF F-4E fleet avionics/ capability upgrade. - Serial # NZ6251 to NZ6256. - Standard SEA wraparound camouflage and USAF stencils of the day. - Full current USAF F-4E fleet RWR/ countermeasure (flare/ chaff) capability. - Aircraft equipped with TISEO and AN/ARN-101 Digital Avionics Modular System (ARN-101 provides for a CCIP bombing mode). F-4E-41/60 'Kahu' Phantom II (88) RNZAF - Comprehensive $140 million upgrade program: project 'Kahu'. First upgraded aircraft operational in 1988. - AN/APG-66(NZ) multi-mode radar. - Modernized cockpit with glass displays, HOTAS and a Ferranti wide-angle HUD. - ALR-66 RWR - ALE-40 countermeasure dispensers. - MIL-STD 1553B databus - Litton Industries LN-93 inertial navigation system. - Airframe and engines completely stripped down and given a life extension. - Aircraft wiring replaced. - Engine smoke abatement system. - Modern weapons procured include GBU-10 LGB kits, AIM-9L, AIM-7M, CRV-7, AGM-65B/G. - F-15 600 gallon HPC tanks as on USAF Phantoms. 1997 onwards all green camouflage. 2004, All RNZAF aircraft repainted 'Medium Grey'. Previous 'urgent operational requirement' program adds targeting pod (Litening), GPS navigation, GBU-12 and JDAM capability for OEF deployment. Background (all factual): In mid 1964 Operational Requirement No. 5/Air called for a tactical combat aircraft to replace the Canberra. Specifically a long range aircraft with the primary role of counter-air/interdiction and secondary roles of close air support and air defense. In June 1965 The Chief of Air Staff, Air Vice-Marshal (AVM) Morrison was quoted as wanting 18 F-111 aircraft for the RNZAF at a cost of £1.5 million per aircraft. The public and media supported the idea but the Chief of Defense Staff (who was a Naval Officer) and the acting Prime Minister publicly opposed the purchase. In August 1965 the Chiefs of Staff Committee rejected the idea of acquiring long-range interdiction aircraft and in September agreed that close air support should be the primary role of the new combat aircraft. In December came Air Staff Requirement No. 12 with the following requirements of the new combat aircraft: - Ability to provide effective air support to ground forces. - Highly reliable and robust - Self defense capability to evade or counter supersonic interceptors and surface-to-air missiles. - Long range. - Ability to operate closely with American and Australian forces. By May 1966 the RNZAF had finished evaluating six candidate aircraft: - F-4C Phantom II - A-7A Corsair II - Mirage IIIO - F-5A Freedom Fighter - F-104G Starfighter - A-4E Skyhawk In August 1966 the RNZAF officially asked the government to purchase 16 F-4 Phantoms at a total cost of £19 million. Now remember AVM Morrison making it known he wanted the F-111? He would later go on to admit he never wanted the F-111 he had wanted the F-4 all along but given the cost of the F-4 he wanted to make it look more attractive (cost wise) by putting it next to the F-111. The minister of Defense then announced the final stage of the evaluation had been reached and a decision was a few weeks away. The purchase of the F-4 seemed to be all but done... BUT the Treasury department now intervened and recommended purchasing the F-5! The RNZAF High Command was furious! But ultimately powerless to halt the path to purchasing the A-4 Skyhwak that had just begun. Over the next year the RNZAF, Cabinet Defense Committee, Treasury, the Finance Minister and the Chief of Defense wrangled over purchasing the F-4 or an alternative (F-5 or A-4). Then at the end of 1967 the New Zealand Currency was devalued and a squadron of F-4 Phantoms was now instantly out of New Zealand’s price range. It was either 11 Phantoms or 16 Skyhawks. So the Skyhawk it was. So if the Treasury Department hadn't intervened in the procurement process towards the end of 1966 it seems entirely likely that New Zealand would have placed and order for the F-4 Phantom II at the end of that year. Or once the NZ dollar devalued in 1967 the option of an initial 11 F-4E order followed by another 5 in 5 years was considered, which I have gone for here.
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